Prevention Webinar Rewilding Childhood; Why Children Need the Wild

Jul 24, 2020 | Coalition Strategy, Parent Education

Join us for a conversation with Nate Bacon to explore the possibility that the nature of childhood is infused with our innate need for contact with the wild – both in the natural world and in ourselves – and that all of our lives might be more shaped by that need than we know.

From this discussion:

Nate Bacon’s website https://tinyurl.com/RewildingChildhood

Resources on the value of free play in nature https://www.informalscience.org/news-views/nature-play-important-cognitive-development-early-learners

Our Sponsor for this event Mountain Sage Natural Health https://www.mountainsagenaturalhealth.com

Mary Christa Smith

Welcome. I’m Mary Christa Smith. I’m the Executive Director for Communities That Care and we are a Prevention Coalition in Summit County, Utah, with a focus on youth health and well being and our mission is to create a culture of health care and collaborate together as a community to create the best possible world for our kids. And I’m so excited to be welcoming you to this webinar this evening. This is truly a passion project for me and delighted to have Dr. Babbie Lester and Nate Bacon here with us today as they are also passionate advocates for kids and wellness and well being. So just a couple of notes before I introduce Babbie and then she will introduce our speaker and expert this evening Nate Bacon. This is a dialogue today. So this isn’t just content at you. But we’re really inviting a conversation here. And I recognize that can be challenging on Zoom. So I’m going to ask you all to lean into the technology and be willing to chat, ask questions. There are no right or wrong answers here. This is meant to be evocative, and to have you all be contributors, and questioning and curious in this space. So, get ready because we are going to ask you to participate. We will take questions by raising your hand or you can also write them in the chat. So you’ll notice at the bottom of your screen, if your screen is like mine, it will say participants and when you click on that, it’ll pop open on the right hand side and down at the bottom. You can say raise hand or lower hand. So that’s one way you can ask them Question, or you can put questions in the chat. And there may be things that come out of this conversation that Nate or Bobbi or myself will put in the chat as well. So let’s jump in and let’s get started. I’ve, I’m really delighted to introduce Dr. Babbie Lester. She’s a naturopathic physician, Doctor of Chinese medicine here in Park City, and her business is mountain sage, natural health. And she and I’ve been friends for a very long time, decades long time. And so I just admire you and love you, Babbie as a friend and as a healer. And as someone who shares this passion for children and youth and well being and this connection to nature and our own innate wisdom, so thank you to Babbie and Mountain Sage for sponsoring this webinar this evening, and I’ll turn it over to her and have her introduce Nate

Babbie Lester

Thank you so much, Mary Christa, and thank you very much for spearheading this project. This is as you and I have talked about also for decades how important it is that that our children have appropriate rite of passage ceremonies and connection with nature. As many of you know, I do have a degree in classical Chinese medicine and nature Pathak, medicine and both of those medicines. The foundation of that medicine is nature and our connection with nature and it’s very easy to see how quickly people get out of balance without time in nature. One of my favorite questions on my initial intake form with new patients is where do you find your greatest sense of peace and 95% of the time people say nature and so whenever, whenever people come and they’re feeling a little bit disturbed or out of balance, Top recommendation is to go sit by a river or sit next to a tree. And so I’m really honored that Mary Krista is, is hosting this tonight and equally is honored to have Nate Bacon here. Nate is one of the senior guides for Animus Valley Institute, which is based out of Durango, Colorado, and fathered by Bill Plotkin, who has his PhD in eco psychology, which is pretty fascinating, soul centric approach to the psyche. Nate lives with his family in the Northern Cascades. And we’re really excited to listen to his new project on Rewilding Childhood and how important it is for our children to get into nature and connect with nature for a lot of reasons that we might be surprised to hear about. So without further ado, I’m gonna pass it off to Nate Bacon. Thanks, Nate for being here.

Nate Bacon

Thank you, Babbie. Thanks for having me. Thank you, Mary Christa.

Great to be here with you all can Can you hear me? Great, thanks.

Yeah, thanks for that lovely introduction, Debbie. Pretty sweet. And maybe the first thing to say is that, as Mary Kristen noted, we’re on zoom. And probably there’s a lot of us here that are getting more and more used to zoom, at least to the degree that we can. But just take knowledge feels important to me to acknowledge especially given context and the topic of what we’re talking about tonight. What we’ll be exploring together. Feels important to acknowledge that there’s a lot of feedback that that we miss on zoom in or personal feedback that that doesn’t happen, you know, sometimes because we can’t see people’s faces. Also, even more than that, that there’s, there’s a loss of a certain kind of embodied presence with each other. And given the technology and the limitations of the technology, it is challenging, as Mary Christ noted, or at least acknowledged, to have an engaging, interactive exploration together. And so again, I want to encourage us as Mary Christa did to, to lean in, into this format in this technology and let’s you know, be in this space together as fully as we can. And you know, embrace the the beautiful irony of being on a computer together to talk about wildness and And on that note,

The title for this conversation that I believe was sent out to you all was the nature of childhood, why children need the wild. And so the idea was that I would spend a little bit of time chatting and exploring that topic a little bit. And and that then it would it would kind of morph into a space where questions can be offered and, you know, insights or even memories wonderings pondering steep questions that may or may not be for me to respond to into the field together, but my primary goal, especially during this this time when I’m chatting and then any answering of questions or responding to whatever you all bring to the table. My primary goal is to do something like stir the pot a little bit, to, to evoke a, maybe a deeper sense of that of this question of why children need the wild. Or even what do we mean by the nature of childhood. There’s a, I just, I love the play of words with the word nature, it’s most often used to describe something other than, you know, something outside of human dwellings, or human habitations or human cities, something other than human. And yet it also conveys a meaning of something like the essence of and in that way, it pervades everything and and there’s, we might, we might let ourselves imagine that there actually is nothing that’s not natural. There’s not anything that we encounter in our lives that is not of the world.

That’s not actually you know born of this earth or of the universe or a part of it in some way or another that therefore everything is natural even this these computer screens are of nature. So, you know a little bit of what I want would like to do here is to expand a little bit or maybe go underneath some of these ideas of what we have about the nature of childhood. Or maybe even more to the point why children need the wild. There are so many more and more of these days, books and and far more articles that elicit really great reasons for why children need to be in nature and even why humans evolved. ages, all developmental stages need access to nature, access to the other than human world in particular.

and there are countless studies, practical, very, you know, scientifically driven empirical studies, with lots of research behind just exploding right now actually about all the all the tangible kinds of ways that, that we might talk about the benefits of being in, in nature, in nature. What if we kind of begin to unfold this idea that everything is nature, that there’s nothing that isn’t nature and we allow ourselves to kind of go underneath what is what’s the deeper story beyond or Underneath are behind these very practical tangible benefits these kind of one to one causal relationships that scientific studies are really great at at pinpointing to us, like, what’s the deeper pattern? What’s the deeper story? What’s the what is the nature of the collection of those? those insights that are just flowing right now. So that’s the territory I want to invite you all into. And that’s kind of an introduction to my stirring the pot a little bit. But hopefully, you’re down to go there with us. So please come along.

I want to introduce just a couple of words that that I think are important words, but also there kind of fun. So let’s play with words for a minute. First word I want to introduce you to is ontogeny. ontogeny, it’s O N T O G E N Y. And there’s two roots of that word one is auto, which is means being something like being in large philosophical sense of that and that Geny G E N Y the end of the word comes from the same root as Genesis. So the beginning of or the process of becoming. So ontogeny means coming into being ontogeny is what I think is a better word for human development. This is because it evokes this process, a process that is always unfolding that is always in motion.

That is not a static things that we can’t actually point to childhood and say this is childhood. That moment is a particular developmental moment. But there’s rather something like a constant unfolding of a self in relationship to the world. And that self has something like a beginning and an end. And where do we want to draw those lines people may disagree about but there There seems to be something true about our consciousness in our bodies as organisms and not just true for, for us in our certain styles of consciousness and bodies, but for all living beings, that that there’s kind of a coming into, and then and then going out of being that we call life in general, in an evolutionary sense of that word we call life that’s what it means to be alive and, and so Here’s this word I want to replace development or human development with this this other word ontogeny. And here’s another fun word. Similar roots new word is neoteny has the same ending, the eny, but it means something different actually. Neoteny is a fancy word meaning the slowing down of the maturation process in an evolutionary sense. here’s a here’s a statistic that I like to it’s my second favorite statistic. The first my first favorite statistic is that 99% of all statistics are made up. My second favorite statistic, this one’s not made up, but we get to laugh about that together. Is that so we’re 96% of our DNA of our genetic coding is the exact same as horses.

We we diverged from horses like 40 million years ago, something like that. And we share 96% of our DNA with them. And we’re something like it’s right around the same as our average temperature. Something like 99 sorry, it’s 98.6 it’s even more than that. It’s something like 99% point something, I’m forgetting the statistic already 99 point something percent of our DNA related to chimpanzees. They’re our closest genetic relatives that are alive today. We diverged from them evolutionarily about 6 million years ago. Here’s the fun fact is that you take that less than 1%. And you and you let it instead of feeling really small, because it’s a fractal like a fraction of a percentage. So first of all, we’re incredibly similar genetically, right? That’s amazing in and of itself, but then let’s focus in on that less than 1% and blow it up really big. And imagine all the differences between ourselves and chimpanzees. And, and while there’s a lot of similarities, there’s also a lot of differences, right. And so things like our bipedalism and our capacity for language, and our mostly hairless bodies, or different facial structures, or different skin pigmentation, these things that when we look at chimpanzees who say, well, we’re very different from them. They’re almost nothing of that 1%. The largest part of that less than 1% is the is our Niamey. It’s the it’s the long gation of our ontogeny of our immature of the phase of our ontogeny where we before we fully mature. So what we might call this Childhood In this sense, so it’s a fascinating reality that we are a species that spends an inordinate amount of its lifespan, being quote unquote, immature, meaning not yet fully developed into an adult of the species.

Unknown Speaker

And so that’s a really amazing fact. And it’s a really curious and mysterious one actually, that has a lot of evolutionary implications. And hopefully, I’ll you know, get to evoke some those in our conversation tonight, if not a little bit here in a few minutes. But so, hold on to that, that question Why? And I won’t pretend like I have all the answers, but I do want to point to some particular threads of the mystery of why do we have such long elongated childhoods? Okay, so there’s a relationship between our ontogeny and our neoteny that has between that and what I like to call our evolutionary expectations. What it is about the world that we expect, not consciously, but that we expect about the world to be true. That through our evolutionary heritage, not just as primates becoming human, but as you know, all the way back from the beginnings of life, single celled bacteria, following the line of through protists and slime molds, and then they’re emerging into the animal lineage and hundreds of millions of years of animal evolution that have evolved in one of the many branches into us over those billions of years We have we have establish a certain kind of pattern of evolutionary expectations that we have to have met at least to a certain degree in order for us to edit baselines for us to continue living. Right. So baseline evolutionary expectations are nutrition and sleep and things like that. But there are there are more onto a genetic, so human development oriented expectations, evolutionary that have been established over these millions and billions of years. Things like a mother’s gaze in our infant infant ears, the touch of skin on skin, the suckle of warm milk on the mother’s breast that That are so deeply ingrained in our humanity, we might say that they’re so deeply ingrained in our animality in our morality, at least, skin to skin contact, the eye gazing that that, that maybe I’ll name a couple and then I’ll make my point. Um, that’s one here’s here’s another completely different kind of category. So listen, listening to having a background of, of birdsong in the morning as a young child who’s just now learned to sit up on our own without falling over, maybe about six months old, not yet walking, maybe starting to crawl, maybe not exploring the ground, the evolutionary expectation of being able to touch and be touched by the more than human world knowing that mom, other caregivers, the community, the tribe, or near at hand, a feeling Safety, a feeling of belonging and the birdsong every morning, the rising of the sun every morning, this pattern, the rising and setting of the sun, the darkness into light. These are evolutionary expectations that we, we don’t think about, but that are absolutely essential to the rhythms and patterns and essence of our humanity, of who we are.

Nate Bacon

And so there’s this question of you know, not just what are these evolutionary expectations, and I’m not going to go through a huge list, I’m just trying to in this moment at least evoke a sense of the kind of territory that we’re talking about. But I want to just offer the possibility that, that when our evolutionary expectations aren’t met, things start to go wrong, that there are consequences. And

and, you know, the big consequences are death. But there are much smaller consequences and they’re the ones that we tend to gloss over. Because we have a way in our, in our contemporary culture to have just saying like, oh, if the, if the child’s alive, the child’s doing okay? Or at least my baby’s healthy. And then we even have kind of small definitions of what health really is. What does it mean to thrive in an evolutionary context in the context of our evolutionary expectations? So here’s another quick notion of plasticity. This is very much related to neoteny. plasticity doesn’t mean the kind of plastic that you find in your milk carton but rather it’s a it’s a, it’s a term I think that comes originally from neuroscience, that that means that we’re adaptable malleable, that especially early in life we are open to deep imprinting. And and that that imprinting can change that it’s not that those patterns aren’t deeply imprinted. And if folks want, we can talk more about what that the context of what that really means and what the implication is there. But I want to make a quick point about this, this dance between our evolutionary expectations and our plasticity in the army. This the slowing down, the elongation of our phase of maturation, of the along ation of our childhood, the army with plasticity, the capacity for for changing ingrained patterns, for example, neurological patterns, Ways rewiring, neurological pathways also true in immunology and emotionally any psychotherapists know about this phenomenon as well. Um

okay so there’s a dance between these things and our evolutionary expectations. the trade off for this great capacity for plasticity that is, it is an inherent part of the lengthening of our childhood evolutionarily. plasticity as a result of that. The trade off the risk is a greater vulnerability to pathos, a greater vulnerability to, for things to four patterns to be established in that long period of immaturity that work well enough to keep life going. But don’t work well enough in a long term context, in relationship to our evolutionary expectations. And there’s a whole host of contexts or categories of places in our lives that where our contemporary modern ways of being in the world don’t. us don’t readily support them the meaning of these evolutionary expectations, especially for our children, but true for all of us as well.

And

so this greater vulnerability, there’s there’s something there’s something really special palpable, about about this and and so I just want to, you know, make this suggestion of the line between drawing a thread between you know some of the larger challenges in our in our world these days. And on one hand and our human development process, on the other hand, are ontogeny what happens when we veer slowly, further and further away from what what we have evolved for millions and billions of years to to

to expect

in our experience of the world.

Just a few more minutes of posturing here So there’s this this phrase, as I was kind of thinking about how to how I might want to orient or in the stirring of this pot tonight, I never know what I’m going to say when I do this kind of thing I like to more or less be spontaneous. My favorite is when I can actually look you all in the eyes and feel your body language and then see what wants to come. But you know, doing the best with that. But as I was imagining some of the territory that I might invite us into tonight I was thinking about this phrase that comes from one of my favorite books that I read years and years ago by David Abraham. The book is called spell of the sensuous and the phrases, the short version of the phrase that’s from a lot longer sentence, and I’m actually going to read you half the paragraph here in a minute, but the phrase is contact and conviviality. So I want to evoke in the context of everything I’ve said. So far this this notion or this possibility of contact, and conviviality with the other than human world being essential to our lives in ways that, that we don’t really understand these days that we probably can’t possibly really understand. Even with all the tools and possibilities of science and other modes of exploration that we can’t really understand the deep, embedded nature of our lives in the world and how much we actually need in the fullest sense of that word, how much we need contact and conviviality with the other than human world.

Okay, well, here’s a, here’s half a paragraph of David Abraham this is what he would he would call the thesis of This book up in a mass of abstractions, our attention hypnotized by a host of human made technologies that only reflect us back to ourselves. hypnotized by a host of human made technologies that only reflect us back to ourselves. It is all too easy for us to forget our carnal inheritance in a more than human matrix of sensations, and sensibilities. Our bodies have formed themselves in delicate reciprocity with the manifold textures, sounds and shapes of an animate Earth. Our eyes have evolved in subtle and interaction with other eyes as our ears are attuned by their very structure, to the howling of wolves, and the honking of geese to shut ourselves off from these other voices, to continue by our lifestyles, to condemn these other sensibilities to the oblivion of extinction is to rob our own senses of their integrity. to rob our minds of their coherence, we are human only in contact in conviviality with what is not human. To shut ourselves off from these other voices, is to rob our own senses of their integrity and to rob our minds of their coherence. We are human only in contact, and conviviality with what is not human.

In this book he brings to life a phrase that’s fairly common, at least in some circles now, which is the more than human world. Perhaps some of you have heard that phrase. That’s from David Abrams in this book, The More Than Human World by which he meant and I mean when I say it, the more than human world meaning the other than human world and the human world, which I think is is really what the heart of his his book is, is, is about our relationship with the other In human world, but what he what he says over and over again is is is that we need full embodied deep relational participation in the more than human world. So not excluding the human community by any means we need as I was evoking with the baby on the mother’s breast and, and the eye gazing. We need contact and conviviality with them more than human world. And as it turns out, what’s good for our you know, as he puts it, our minds the coherence of our minds, what’s good for our psychology, what’s good for our spirit is also what’s good for our physiological development. It’s also what’s good for our kinesthetic development for our for our capacity to you know, have balance and strength and coordination in the world in which comes through wild play as in childhood. It’s also what’s true for us, immunologically. All the, all of the research about our microbiomes and the microbiotic Foundation of life on earth as it is, points us toward contact and conviviality with the earth as the, as the primary driver for human health. And so there’s this, there’s this kind of massive, underlying underpinning Foundation, of, of not just not just of our health, but including our health, our capacity to be healthy, physically, psychologically, even spiritually vibrant and thriving human beings on this earth the foundation of that in all of these areas of our being, they’re all the same and they all in my eyes in my pattern reading, they all come down to this, this, to contact and conviviality. We need the earth. We are not visitors on the earth, we were not planted here into cities, we need the earth we need contact with the earth with the other than human world. Because our contact with the with the other than human world with the more than human world, they’ll say, our relational engagement with the world is is how we incorporate the world to make a self. That’s what the human development process is, is is an incorporation of the world. It’s a relational unfolding of a self in relationship to the world. And a self is only made it only exists in relationship to everything else, there is no isolated anything. But a self cannot be made in isolation. A self is inherently relational, whether it’s a human self or any other kind of self. Everything is what it is by virtue of its relationship with everything else. And in us, we, ourselves, our bodies, our psyches, unfold in a relational context of contact and conviviality with the more than human world. That’s my theory. That’s my thesis. That’s what I’m probably going to stick to, although some of you might try to talk me out of it, but we’ll see. I mean, I could just keep chatting forever and ever. But let’s, let’s open it up here, Mary Christa. And Babbie, you got to stop me. I’ll just keep talking. So I’m gonna pass it over to you.

Mary Christa Smith

Thank you, Nate. I, you know, you’ve evoked like you said, stirred the pot. So many thoughts that I’ve had had, and in a lot of different directions. One of the things that you said, which is interesting is we like to split like humans and nature. And my computer’s not nature and nature’s outside and you began this conversation tonight saying, No, actually everything’s nature. Everything comes from Mother Earth herself. And so we can think our computers aren’t nature but they actually are. And I think about that, along with plasticity of our, our brains and our beings and working in prevention, one of the things I hear and see is this great, great concern for the addictive nature of electronics, especially when that becomes the primary way that small children, teenagers, all of us and engage with our electronics and you know, I’ve read some interesting studies. Talk with experts that are showing now that babies when they’re given electronic will bond with the electronic device rather than with their parent, their caregiver, what have you. And so there’s something really, in my mind disturbing and powerful that’s happening there when it comes to our evolutionary expectation about gay ease and connection, and if that’s happening in the electronic world, the implications for that for childhood and for our on ontogeny, ontogeny, and our unfolding. And you and I’ll just throw this in because it came up when you were talking about birdsong. And there’s something so deep like it gives me chills thinking about bird song in the morning, and I read a story that during COVID and during the stay at home order that there are people who are in their 80s who heard bird Something that they hadn’t heard since their childhoods, like suddenly something slowed down enough. And we couldn’t go and do all the things that there seemed at least where I live in Park City in Summit County, this turning towards natures this place of sanctuary and refuge in healing because there was nothing else we could really participate in and it felt like people got a sense of what things were like before they were so busy and technologically driven and at the same time our kids were asked in school to do all their learning on the computer. There’s just this very interesting juxtaposition or paradox of what’s happening now. So I don’t really have a question to go with all of that. But you know, I I am concerned about the bonding to the devices That’s happening and the implications of that for our kids. And I see a number of people on this call, and I’m really happy to see you all here who work with children and they work with them in nature, a lot of the people on this call and I wonder if you could speak to that, you know, these people who have an opportunity to really work with families and kids, what can they do? And what do they need to know and be thinking about?

Nate Bacon

Yeah, thanks, Mary Christa. So that’s a great question. And, and it’s such a relevant topic of either concern or non-concern, depending on who you ask. And yeah, so one way that I consider my approach to childhood and child development, human development in general is as a systems approach. And to use some language of systems there’s a there are feedback loops. that are created, whether they’re neurological or, you know, they’re always something more than just neurological. But that’s the one that makes sense to most people. So it’s the one we, and there’s a lot of research on it. So it’s the one we end up talking about, you know, kind of reductionist scientific kind of way, but we’ll just say in a general way, there are feedback loops that are both of our bodies and of our of our minds.

That these feedback loops that when we get stuck, we we build them up, we get stuck in them, that’s what we call addiction. And, and, yeah, I think just as you are pointing out, there’s there is this increased plasticity or maybe not increased, but it’s the highest more basically with some with some wiggle room here as a general statement, the younger you are, the more plastic our beings are. And which is good news and bad news in in in talking about things like what you’re evoking I’ll say why in just a moment. But just to evoke what I read from David Abrams again, that his line of our attentions hypnotized by a host of human made technologies that only reflect us back to ourselves. So if they’re only reflecting us back to ourselves, which that’s essentially what they are right that Marshall McLuhan, the great social communications thinker from many decades ago. He said the medium is the message and this was way before. This is before screens much less before social media and In computer games and things like that, the medium is the message by which he meant that the content is secondary. The way in which it’s delivered is what is what has the most impact. And and, and, you know, yes, we can say like, if you know, watching a nature documentary is is probably more evocative for our evolutionary expectations, then, you know, a host of any other kinds of things that can happen on the screen. But especially for a child, for a young child, they’re the, the this the reflection is still the human made thing, reflecting our own humanity back to us, reflecting and our humanity in this kind of feedback loop. So it’s not just a feedback loop of addiction. It’s a feedback loop of where’s our attention. What does our attention being offered to? There’s this another neuroscience concept is sensory gating, which is a fancy way of saying, what information comes into our consciousness and what information doesn’t come through our consciousness. So the gating is the is the things that we deem important and they’re deemed important by, by what what we learn to give our attention to. And if and as children we learn to give our attention to the parts of the world that the other people in our culture, especially our parents, and our families, communities.

We learned from them like oh, this is worth paying attention this vast world. That’s even just right outside our doors. Not not even you know, like the next state or, or country over not just the rain forest in the Amazon. I’m talking the leaves in the spiders crawling up the bark of the lilac trees just outside my door, for the For, especially for a child but even for us adults, if we’re willing, there are worlds within worlds within worlds of magic and mystery to be explored and encountered. There is there are endless presences to offer our attention to that are themselves dynamic, always unfolding always changing. And, and what we give our attention to, if if we’re shaping our, our minds and in our children’s minds to only deem the feedback loops have of reflecting us back to ourselves, in our, in our, in our cardboard boxes or in the backseat of the car, you know, moving from one building to another building in the air conditioned environments, if that’s the primary context of our children’s lives, and then and then even you know the word of the day And, you know, the texture of the walls or the smell of the books are replaced with this one thing that it does that that reflects, you know back to ourselves in a certain kind of way that we lose so much of the sensual capacity, there’s a visual stimulation, but there’s we’ve lost the smell. There’s some audio sensation, but it’s it has a quality that’s missing, because the presence is gone the presence of the world, that feedback loop of just reflecting us back to ourselves.

and then we imagine, let ourselves just begin to imagine what what is being missed in that so the all the neural pathways of where our attention goes, that’s what creates a world. That’s what creates our capacity later to even perceive that there’s more to the world then than this Certain style of being that we have grown accustomed to, and it becomes harder and harder as we get older to recognize that children, the beautiful thing about our plasticity is that children’s, always somewhere deep and it’s true for all of us, but it’s just more accessible as children, always somewhere deep in us, as Mary Oliver, the poet says, is a beast shouting The earth is exactly what I wanted. The earth is exactly what I wanted. We just have to learn how to perceive the earth. And if our attention is hypnotized by a host of human made technologies that only reflect us back to ourselves, we’re missing so much of the world and we’re missing so much possibility for who we can become for what and styles of being that we can incorporate into our own selves, to become something to unfold into something beautiful in life and generate have in relationship with the rest of the earth. So I think it’s a significant issue. Yeah. And to be totally honest, I really do.

Mary Christa Smith

Babbie.

Babbie Lester

Thanks, Nate. No, this has been super interesting. And for me personally, it’s really evoked a lot of so one of the most formative classes I took in college was anthropology of the senses. And it was all about how we experience our senses and how culturally it also is very different. So living in Park City, I have opportunities to experience and to focus on different senses than those that live elsewhere. And the importance of that. And so, other examples as we talk about technology that I’ve been thinking about through this is, like our my big project that I did was instead of a visual map, I made a sound map of our college campus and recorded the songs that are on campus, and then put that onto a Google Map. And so just thinking about and It really can be impactful to take a moment to think about how you experience a place. And when you focus in on instead of doing visually, which is kind of our natural first place that we go, but to think about what does it sound like, which is the first sense that we develop, why we’ve lost touch with that, or what places tastes like, and then how that plays into your memories. And as you think through your experiences in different places, and focus on those different senses, it totally changes your experiences there. So and then that I relate to Currently I work for SOS outreach, and we are a youth development organization that connects kids with mentors via outdoor exploration, specifically skiing and snowboarding. And our curriculum really focuses on emotional learning, and in trying to teach kids how to understand and manage their own feelings, and I think that’s something that’s really relatable to a lot of us work. with you. And it’s something that we can very explicitly teach to kids of saying, How are you feeling right now? And if it’s just, oh, I feel good. Let’s dive deeper into that. And when they start to really understand all these different words that we have to explain how we feel, and then explaining how you react to those different feelings and understanding what are your own personal coping strategies and coping mechanisms, that for us SOS on the mountain, it’s really easy because you experience so many different emotions when you’re outside and you’re on the mountain to identify if you’re feeling scared right now, what do you need? What support Do you need to react positively to that? And then how can we transition that to when you’re at home when you’re in school, when you’re in kind of these more everyday experiences that kids are having these days when you’re sitting on a zoom call? How can we help to train our youth and ourselves, to be present and to experience things differently? Then, so that you’re going a little bit deeper. So not really a question, but just things that I’ve taken away from this. So thank you for walking us through some of that. And Caitlin has a question though.

Caitlin

Oh, I do.

Mary Christa Smith

Yeah, I do.

Nate Bacon

Caitlin, can I just respond to me? Um yeah. Thanks. Hey, Abby, do you? Did you ever read Walter Ong, when you were doing the sound stuff?

He’s just worth mentioning just really briefly for you and others. Not that necessarily any of you at all would go read him. But I just want to I just want to like, affirm what you were saying about sound as the as an in the style of consciousness that is centered primarily in sound as a dominant sense rather than the vision he for example, Walter J. Ong, OMG. He wrote an essay that was really influential to me years ago, called world as a view versus world as event and he was looking at oral culture is all about In the world, non literate, so non reading and writing cultures, all of whom for which sound is is, is the not necessarily primary or dominant, but it’s the it’s the, the way in which their view of self and cosmos, self and world are oriented, most primarily, whereas we reading visual cultures we orient primarily, visually. And this beautiful thing that he says in that essay that I just love and resonated with me so much as is that with sound, we have a sense of the liveness of the world. When we hear a sound it’s as if the world is speaking, like oh, something’s happening over there. Whereas with our, our generations, after generations of reading cultures have training our minds to to have this subject matter Object I can read something but it’s about something else to have this kind of intermediary in our consciousness and the visual like we can look at something and say, oh that thing is not living nothing is dead. But when the when the sense of sound is dominant there’s there’s always a sense of lit and if we can just imagine like being in a in a living forest, right in a wild place and all of the sounds especially at those crepuscular hours all of those sounds whether it’s the bird song in the tree or you know, sleeping at night the scuffling have something in the leaf litter in the forest or, or the grunt you know, around the around the rock, you know, that arises our sense of fear. There’s always it’s always a speaking as something is happening in the world. And that sense is not a static thing. It’s not a backdrop for life, but it’s an unfolding process of which we are a part of We are immersed in the world and of the world, as opposed to doing our thing and having the world as a backdrop in that feedback loop that that is just us reflecting ourselves back to ourselves in a sound oriented consciousness, it’s a participation. So I just because that’s an aside, I wasn’t planning on talking about that, but it’s such a cool thing that you did and that you said about this the sound. So thank you. And the second part of what you’re saying it reminded me that I wanted to mention specifically that, that this notion of places and wild places, I want to extend that this sense of nature, also wild places, why children need the wild, the subtitle of this talk tonight. So I, I want to really explicitly stretch that out and evoke the sense of the wild and and what we call nature is not just something outside of our houses and or you know, down at the end of the street if we’re lucky or outside of town, but it’s includes us and that includes also our human nature. So it includes, for example, the wildness, of, of our, of the parts of ourselves of the other ness of ourselves and to encounter in a relationship, the parts of ourselves that we might call emotions, to be able to, to be in the wild landscape of our emotions into into do the beautiful work that you’re doing of helping kids to, to become more conscious. Again, to offer our attention to create those, those feedback loops to offer our attention to the emotional landscape is no different than immersing ourselves in a you know, in a You know, a landscape that we might otherwise call nature, it’s, it’s an essential part of the wildness of the world. Through our human experience, the emotional landscape would also include, like our own relationships with our bodies, with imagination, all the dimensions of our human experience. So thank you for bringing that in and writing

Babbie Lester

to that, to me, the the concept of place I find very interesting and something that is very specific have I defined place as being that intersection of space and time. And so no space is the same place at any time. And so you can go out into nature, and it’s one place and then an hour later, it’s a completely different place and that you’re experiencing in a different way. And I think that adds a lot of value, especially when we’re thinking about kids who they too are in different places, every hour of the day. They’re constantly developing and evolving into themselves and who they are and so placing them into different unique places is really important, even if it is in your own backyard.

Nate Bacon

It’s great. Well said Babbie. Thank you. Did you have a question? Also Caitlin or a statement? or was she just putting you on the spot?

Caitlin

Yeah, it’s like, it’s so different. It’s not as philosophical as when you guys were talking about but I, I’ve just been kind of thinking a lot. So I work for a Land Trust here in Park City and one of our programs we take kids outside for free play. And what I want to ask you is like, what, when did we decide that going? Yeah, when did adults like lose their buy in with nature play and like, I mean, cuz all of us know that when we grew up, we went outside to play and, you know, some of our best memories are from playing outside, and I understand that. Maybe now it’s different. We have iPads and things like that and movies that we can pop in. But like, what’s a better babysitter than that? You know, instead of putting a screen in front of a kid, why aren’t we just sending kids outside to go play and say, Come home at dinnertime? You know, like, Why are adults not? You know, we know that this like childhood development phase is so important, but why are we not helping foster that and like, make it? I don’t, I don’t know how to, you know what I’m trying to say? But like, Why are adults not buying into this? What’s going on? Is it luck?

Nate Bacon

Yeah, that’s, that’s, that’s such a central question. Right now, I think cable not just to people that are interested in working with children but like, to the state of the world, in our in our the future of humanity and the future of the earth. I think it’s a it’s a central question. Like, what happened? What’s going on? Yeah, why? Why is this is considered Okay. Why is this considered even normal? Why is why is it? Why is it less normal to be on on a call about rewilding childhood, like why does that have to even be a thing?

Caitlin

Yeah, exactly.

Nate Bacon

and there’s no easy answer. And, you know, you you indicated some of the more recent layers of that unfolding. You know, the, the, the technological dimensions of that and, and some of the fear that has arisen for various reasons. And, you know, Richard Lewis, of course, has a great book about some of that and other people have written great things. Jay Griffiths is one actually who she wrote a book in the US and it was called kiss. She’s from Great Britain. And I think over there it’s called a country called childhood so much less well known book than for example Richard looms books but she she takes that story a lot a lot deeper and a lot makes a lot older until like the last few hundred years and and especially in her home place and then the loss of the commons and transformations of societies our relationship with land and privatizing land, like where can Where can we go actually, like most people have to drive a long ways to get to a wild place. And, and even even in a place like Park City or where I live here in the North Cascades in Washington. There are just miles and miles and miles of private land that we don’t have access to and there anyway, there are so many layers. Have that story that go back, I think a lot further and that are that are a lot, a lot. They’re a lot more mysterious, and there’s a lot going on there. To me it’s it’s a, it’s kind of a snowball effect and a kind of unfolding of what happens when we get into a certain groove, culturally over hundreds, thousands of years and certain kinds of ways that that kind of feedback loops of cultural forms snowball into each other and we end up in a context where, as one example of many of the things that are quite, actually not normal, you know, if we just step back and have a larger picture of what’s of the world we’re living in, and of our our human ways of being in the world that are are not actually normal, and they’re not working either, which we can see any number of places we look. And, and one of those is that is the question that you’re, you’re asking, like, Why? Why can’t Why? What happened? Why are adults? Why is that normal for adults to make those kinds of decisions? And so I have lots of feelings or lots of thoughts about that, and no specific answer, because there’s no I don’t think there’s any kind of pinpoint thing I wish there was because then we could go to that thing and change it, right. But one thing that I think is important is, is to is to begin to create a new snowball, and that is happening, people like you, and Abby are doing the work that you’re doing and helping to create a new kind of snowball. And you know, we’re all here together, kind of packing it in a little bit more, packing it in a little bit more. So So that some other kinds of feedback loops and pathways so that we can renormalize so that we can or in a sense reimagine again what it what childhood is or what it should be how we should support our kids and how do we need this is a really central question that is why I love the collaboration of some county Communities That Care Organizations like this especially this one and Babbie your work and in my work and everything that you all are doing is that is that it’s we’re talking about a system a systemic kind of necessary response that is absolutely essential for us to kind of collectively reimagine because what it what it will take is not just, you know, people that that are able to take kids outside but it’s a it’s a it’s a reestablishing of values. And those values have to be fought for and reimagined. And and then in our cultures have to be reshaped around them. And that’s a that’s a long process but an absolutely essential one.

Mary Christa Smith

And I see that we have a question from Susan. Susan, do you want to click in and ask your question?

Susan (guest)

Yes. Thank you appreciate it. So I, I am not in a profession working with children. Okay, I try to be knows my history but my son is now 24. He was 18 months old when we adopted him. He was born in Russia. He was well taken care of he was in an orphanage. I’ve had a big interest, a large interest and all that it’s being disgusted based on his growing up. I had a therapist when he was in. He was one of these kids. diagnosed with attention deficit disorder, you know, to hyper. He’s got some learning challenges, but I had a therapist who specialized in neurology, say to me when my son was in grade school, she said, I think he’s on the low end of the spectrum of attachment disorder. And she was the first person who explained to me that a mother’s gaze into a baby’s eyes sets up neurological paths and neural, you know, of attachment and it was things that I just never never knew. So, you know, sort of struck the challenging we, my son, we lived in Park City for eight years, but moved to Southern California from the northeast, and I retired became a stay at home mom loved it. I guess one of the things I want to observe is that when my son was five in kindergarten, I worked in a public school. The parents were teaching parent were were the aides, and I’ll never forget in this is five year olds, hearing a conversation. This is outside of Los Angeles today. five year olds debating what was better what school was better USC or UCLA. And I remember looking at these kids with my mouth dropping open thinking, this is coming from the parents, okay? And where we live back then up until eight years ago was called pal asperities. And it’s, and I’m not, you know, Park City I was meant to live here and then hopefully I’ll die here. However, it’s like park the whole Park City is like almost like a clone of the area where we grew up, you know, very, a lot of people with money very entitled children, a lot of competition in what college you’re going to go to if you don’t go to college. There’s something wrong with you. You know, My son is still sort of struggling with finding himself. But he The reason we moved here even though we skied here for years was so he could go to a school called Wasatch Academy that understood kids who learn differently. My son was on the in this is in ninth grade, the competitive snowboard team. He was always his been his best element when he was skateboarding or mountain biking or ski or snowboard. Or skiing. He grew up thinking he was stupid, because of the environment of the public school system, especially that were these kids. You know, we’re taught by parents almost not so much by like they the parents said, Well, this is how you should behave, kids model parents behavior, and so much emphasis and I this is like sort of one of my soap boxes and other soap boxes, you know, electronics and what that does, you know, for kids, what we did with our son at the end of fourth, fifth and sixth grade, we sent him to summer camp in northern Minnesota, where they and by the third year they he was they were kayaking up into Cal into Canada. Again, he was in his best element when he was outdoors and in touch with nature. And one of the books that I love, August is what was recommended back then called last child in the woods, saving our children from nature deficit disorder and how it ties into the whole you know, the importance of You know, kids just being behind computers being on their game back Game Boys was back then when my son was growing up. And I think it’s a shame I now have a 19 month old grandson, my son, son. And so I’m like really interested in all this now he wasn’t adopted obviously, or anything like that. But everything that you’re talking about, I just think is so critical. However, I think it’s I think it’s it is different in Utah, people do tend to do things more outdoors and engage with nature. However, I think it’s also the parents who are like, well, if you don’t go to an Ivy League school, if you don’t, you know, there’s something wrong with you. And so to me changing you know, I mean, I can’t change anything, one person can change something, but to me that’s like a critical issue in this whole conversation, which is, you know, a parent, you know, allowing it I was, you know, I’m older, a lot older than all of you and grew up summer vacation. seemed like it lasted years because you know, we went out in the morning and played in the dirt and played with our friends and didn’t go to home until dinnertime. So anyway, I’ll stop talking with that but I’m just you know, I’m so on board with and I just want to mention one other thing about plasticity. Before we adopted our son we hit there are doctors in this country that is evaluate kids with from Eastern Europe who’ve been in orphanages, and I’ll never forget, one doctor was said, Well, I’m really concerned about his head size being too small. I talked to another doctor who said she had done more than five years of study of children coming from Eastern Europe who’ve been in orphanages and and I’ve been told this already that children who are adopted under the age of two showed dramatic growth and and, you know, in other words, they can come from a maybe not optimal background, but but change and this doctor said she saw that children who are adopted less and less than two years old, they showed It dramatic head growth. I mean, to me, it’s like amazing the resilience of the human spirit but the human body as well. Yeah, that gives me hope. And I’ll just be quiet with that.

Nate Bacon

That’s beautiful. Susan. Yeah, thank you for that. Yeah, I also have a, you know, the, our, our capacity for change, you know, it’s, it’s our vulnerability. It’s also one of our deepest human assets, I believe. And, you know, that is also like you said, for me, too. It’s a big source of hope for me. So thanks for naming that.

Mary Christa Smith

I’d love to just add a little something to what you said Susan, which is I really appreciate you speaking specifically to the culture here in Park City in particular, the pressure to perform and I you know, and I think it ties into what Abby and Caitlin were also speaking with Which is where have we lost this as parents this understanding of how important it is for our kids to be out in nature in the wild unsupervised, having those wild summer experiences, if you will, and so much of it is tied to productivity. And this is what it takes to get ahead. And you know, in the past, Caitlin has said that they’ve had their free play in nature, opportunities with summit Land Conservancy, and people are like, well, what’s the curriculum here? And what are the kids learning when they’re out there? And we’ve just gotten to this point where we think everything is about standardized tests and the college you’re going to and how you can fill each and every day with being productive. And I think it’s a huge issue and challenge, especially right here in our community.

Nate Bacon

Yeah, I would agree with you on that, that it’s a huge challenge just in general And then maybe the Park City is an amplified version of that. But I think, you know, just in a large sense, a large context that

that narrowing of

Babbie Lester

the scope of our humanity as far as what’s deemed important and what’s not deemed important that that actually not only limits us to that sphere, but there’s a you know, there’s a, in systems thinking and other kinds of, you know, complexity theory and all that there’s a there’s this, you know, notion, this kind of truism, the way the world works, that this, you all know this phrase already the, the whole is greater than the sum of its parts. And so, when you when we when we limit something to not just the its parts and we and we separate them out, but then we limit the importance to just one of those parts of the hole. We miss the what what comes From the interrelationship of all of those different aspects of our lives, which it’s not just that we’re missing these other things, but it’s that we’re missing the, the kind of confluence of all of these dimensions of our lives. That is really what what, where the real juice comes in, is the though the whole ism of our lives. And and I also just love on the other hand, this kind of like, you know, twist of fate is all the research that’s coming out now of not not just about other learning styles and that that’s increasingly validated in various kinds of ways that there are other learning styles, but also that that free play, and especially free play in wild spaces actually increases intelligence and in a holistic kind of way or The possibility of intelligence and a more like we’re saying a more holistic kind of intelligence, not one that’s confined to a certain style of learning and performing and being in a certain subset of cultural form that that doesn’t even really work that well, quite frankly. And, you know, I’m speaking that from someone who did really well in school and has advanced graduate degrees and blah, blah, blah, like, that system doesn’t actually work very well to make as one of my teachers, so to make people that are worth descending from, to make beautiful human beings. And it’s a shame that, that that that, that we, we put so much over emphasis on one dimension of our lives in that kind of way. So, yeah, I’m you know, my my hardy support and thanks to those of you that are fighting that good fight

Nate I really appreciate what you’re saying about the snowball and creating a new snowball. No and it it feels to me I’m there’s so much so many circles in my head going right now about the things that we’ve been talking about in terms of one just of getting out in nature and sort of you know, people now are discovering the whole philosophy or the technique of shinrin Yoku, which is Japanese for forest air baby. And it’s become very popular in Japan where the technique is to go out in nature and activate your senses, you know, and really what are you hearing what are you smelling? What are you to be fully present with your senses? And so I love that that’s coming around now is this you know, quote unquote new science of how good it is. For, for us to be in nature and how it you know, studies are showing that it lowers blood pressure and, you know, helps with anxiety. And the other thing that is coming up really strongly is, there’s a book called half empowerment by Barbara Marciniak. And she’s talking about different moving into a different level of consciousness. And one of the best ways that we can do that one is by activating the pineal gland. And one of the best ways to activate the pineal gland not only as meditation and focus on kind of the third eye, but also by listening by alternating, listening from each air. And so she says one of the best techniques is to just listen with the right ear and then listen with the left ear and then listen with the right ear as a way of really activating the pineal gland. But I think a shift in consciousness and what Abby and Caitlin are talking about is that that I believe that we’re at a pivotal moment right now. Worldwide, a shift in consciousness, you know, it feels like right now is a there is an up swelling of the psyche and up this psychic energy of people just intuitively feeling that, that the course that we were on and some still are on is just not working.

Nate Bacon

Yeah, I agree. And yeah, that’s, I love what what you’re bringing is different kinds of practices and and, you know I’m part of my work when we get to be in person. We People in his his experiential processes that that evoke these dimensions of our humanity and I love doing sensorial explorations meditations like that. And doing them with sound is one of my favorites. And I love learning. I didn’t know that about the pineal gland. That’s great. Thank you for sharing that.

And I just want to mention that there’s just there’s a I find it amusing and in a very sweet and tender and beautiful kind of way of like these. As you were kind of laughing at these new new practices these new the new science of and, you know, like to do for I have a forest bathing practice. Have studies that show that it’s good for lowering blood pressure, and it’s good For stress reduction and it’s good for you know, heart health and and etc etc that each of those studies are these great individual kinds of things are like they’re like snowflakes on the snowball that that in some ways validate with the language of our current culture like in ways that that that what Susan was just talking about and MiraCosta that language of the academic world that we put on a pedestal and to achieve and certain kinds of thinking in the world that uses that language and that in that approach, to to validate and affirm the importance of of these practices in these little individual ways. And then if also if we just look at the larger picture These are all these are all just saying, you know, just practice being a human being.

And I, I love that and I also and I also think it’s, it’s important and sweet to just remember like, that’s what all of these are. Really, it’s like, let’s, let’s try to remember what it means to be a human being. And to be a human being means implicitly, to be a part of the earth. It means to be in relationship with other beings, that that all together constitute what we call the world, of human in other than human. All together we constitute the world and we are always whether we’re conscious of it or not in relationship with everything else. And in the practice of offering our attention to that with which we’re in relationship, whether it’s the the light coming through the trees, Trees are the smell of the you know, the rising steam of the morning light off the forest floor or the birdsong or your child’s fingertips in your ears as you’re walking along the sidewalk. Just the noticing of our, our embodied embedded presence in the world. These are all practices that are just saying hey, let’s remember what it is to be. Be a being of earth to be a human to be an animal.

Babbie Lester

And I think to to get back to the reconnected pneus of it, you know, pre tough Capra talks about the the web that has no Weaver and interconnectivity of it all. There is an amazing YouTube video that just came out with Zack Bush and Sacha Stone. I don’t know if you know who Zack Bush’s is. Yeah. Okay. Phenomenal YouTube video. Five questions with Zack Bush and Sacha Stone where he talks about the microbiome and regenerative agriculture as the way to help recover the world, not just immunologically but consciously with a growth in consciousness and that this this virus going around that we have vilified is actually the thing that is helping us to shift our DNA as a response to certain chemicals and you know, pesticide practices and, and chemicals that we’ve used that our body now has to shift to in order to survive. And it’s pretty beautiful that his answer is regenerative agriculture, you know, and how then we are the microcosm and the macrocosm And how we in order to change our microbiome, we need the earth to do that. And we need nature to do that.

Nate Bacon

Yeah, yeah, I’ll add something that I’ve taken over years of reading. Lynn Margulis and Dorian Sagan, have done an attempt to explain who they are. But Lynn Margulis is a radical cell biologist who totally exploded our ideas of evolution on on earth and moving way more toward a sense of symbiosis and rather than competitive natural selection, anyway, she’s a cell biologist was she died a decade or so ago and her son Dorian Sagan, and they, they, they just write and speak so beautifully about this. This notion That and others have have, you know, follow their lead on this over the years recently, that as we realize more and more about the microbiome that we inhabit, and also the this is where their work really comes in the evolutionary context of, of how we became who we are and how everything became what they are especially multi celled beings with eukaryotic cells, so cells with nuclei in them, that that we’re all bacteria that evolved from bacteria that have 10 times more bacterial DNA in our bodies than we do human DNA. And that actually every human DNA every human cell in our body, has human DNA in our in the nucleus But in the mitochondria is bacterial DNA that from, you know, our evolutionary lineage billions of years ago. And anyway, just knowing all of this it changes our sense of self. That our selves we are composite relational imbedded beings. We are not isolated entities and it and there’s a I agree there’s a radical change in consciousness that is is kind of just beginning to take hold and you know my prayers that it is that it sweeps across humanity and does does its work kind of dethroning these old structures of how we think of ourselves how we consider ourselves, and therefore how we consider the earth because we think that those are two different things but they’re not.

Mary Christa Smith

Well, here we are. It’s 8pm Mountain Standard Time, but it’s 7pm, where you are in the Cascades, Nate. And so we’ve come to the end of our first but certainly not the last opportunity to work with you. And as Nate said, previously, you know, we have a dream that at some point, we’ll all be able to be together and provide experiences for parents and kids and our community to do this work, outside and experientially in nature. So we look forward to that. in the chat, you can see Nate has a landing page where if you are interested in staying up on what he is creating, you can visit it there. I’m going to send it out with a link to this webinar and with some other reason resources. And I saw a need in here a question from Caitlin and Abby wondering if there’s a specific resource that cites the information that they can share with those that need the curriculum and data buy in about the importance of unstructured play. So if you have a couple of key studies that are digestible, that we could send out, I’d love it, if you could send those to me as well. And I’ll make sure that those are sent the next time. And I’m just really grateful to you for sharing your passion and your wisdom. And I’m wondering babby and Nate if you have any final comments before we go.

Nate Bacon

I’m sure I’ll just you know, I’m I’m learning to practice the the shameless art of self promotion as a way of, of putting my work out there in the world, one of my edges. And so yeah, I just want To give you all the context is that my work for decades has decades and that old for a while more than a decade has been in eco centric human development, nature based human development, various capacities as well as Ecology and Evolutionary context and implications for our human development process. And I’ve kind of been in this dance for a year or two, of deciding to create a rather substantial project, you know, a body of work that’s specific to childhood. And so it’s great to have an opportunity to speak and be in conversation and hear from folks in this way and I’m doing this with my partner and we’re also we’re also doing a kind of sister project. Which is about rewilding birth, pregnancy and birth. She’s a midwife amongst other things. And we have been recently giving more of our attention to the birth side of the project and the childhood project. But so we’re I just wanted to mention that we’re developing this work.

Unknown Speaker

And while developing platforms and context within which we can share what we have to share in that regard. And so at some point, there’s going to be a larger launch of you know, website and different ways that you can access says resources and our own sharing of resources in this regard, so if you from the email that MiraCosta will send out or clicking in the link that’s in the chat right now. You can leave your email, it’s just a place to leave your email address. If you want to stay Touch and you’ll be on an email list and of course I won’t send you a ton of stuff by any means but just to keep in touch if you’d like to. And just offer my my gratitude for that. Actually, for the YouTube people that might watch this. I just want to read the thing out loud so that they can have it to the address is HTTP https colon, backslash backslash t i n w url  dot com slash or backslash rewildingchildhood, tiny URL dot com backslash rewildingchildhood Okay, thanks for that moment. And thank you all for for joining me and having me. Just really appreciate it and appreciate your participation as well.

Unknown Speaker

Mary Christa and Nate, just want to say thank you so much for your time tonight and thank you everyone for being on. It’s really It’s inspiring to know that people are excited about this and that maybe there is a snowball that’s starting to roll downhill and gather some momentum. So, Mary Christa, thank you for hosting. Nate, thank you so much for, for your expertise.

Nate Bacon

Pleasure, Thank you,

Mary Christa Smith

all of you. I’ll be sending out a follow up. Thank you. Thank you. Thank you. And let’s keep our snowball going.

Babbie Lester

Thanks.

Nate Bacon

Thank you. Thank you.

Mary Christa Smith

Bienvenidos. Soy Mary Christa Smith Soy el Director Ejecutivo de Communities That Care y somos una Coalición de Prevención en el Condado de Summit, Utah, con un enfoque en la salud y el bienestar de los jóvenes y nuestra misión es crear una cultura de atención médica y colaborar juntos como comunidad para crear El mejor mundo posible para nuestros hijos. Y estoy muy emocionado de darte la bienvenida a este seminario web esta noche. Este es realmente un proyecto apasionante para mí y estoy encantado de tener al Dr. Babbie Lester y Nate Bacon aquí con nosotros hoy, ya que también son apasionados defensores de los niños y el bienestar y el bienestar. Así que solo un par de notas antes de presentarle a Babbie y luego presentará a nuestra oradora y experta esta noche, Nate Bacon. Este es un diálogo hoy. Entonces esto no es solo contenido para ti. Pero realmente estamos invitando a una conversación aquí. Y reconozco que puede ser un desafío en Zoom. Así que les pediré a todos que se inclinen por la tecnología y estén dispuestos a chatear, hacer preguntas. No hay respuestas correctas o incorrectas aquí. Esto está destinado a ser evocador, y hacer que todos ustedes sean contribuyentes, y cuestionadores y curiosos en este espacio. Entonces, prepárate porque te vamos a pedir que participes. Responderemos preguntas levantando la mano o también puede escribirlas en el chat. Entonces notará en la parte inferior de su pantalla, si su pantalla es como la mía, dirá participantes y cuando haga clic en eso, se abrirá en el lado derecho y hacia abajo en la parte inferior. Puedes decir levantar la mano o bajar la mano. Entonces, esa es una forma en que puede hacerles preguntas, o puede hacer preguntas en el chat. Y puede haber cosas que surjan de esta conversación que Nate o Bobbi o yo también pondremos en el chat. Así que saltemos y comencemos. Estoy encantado de presentarle al Dr. Babbie Lester. Ella es una doctora naturista, doctora en medicina china aquí en Park City, y su negocio es la salvia de montaña, la salud natural. Y ella y yo hemos sido amigas durante mucho tiempo, décadas. Y entonces, simplemente te admiro y te amo, Babbie como amiga y como sanadora. Y como alguien que comparte esta pasión por los niños y la juventud y el bienestar y esta conexión con la naturaleza y nuestra propia sabiduría innata, así que gracias a Babbie y Mountain Sage por patrocinar este seminario web esta noche, y se lo entregaré a ella y que ella presente a Nate

Babbie Lester

Muchas gracias, Mary Christa, y muchas gracias por encabezar este proyecto. Así es como usted y yo hemos hablado durante décadas sobre lo importante que es que nuestros hijos tengan ceremonias apropiadas de rito de iniciación y conexión con la naturaleza. Como muchos de ustedes saben, tengo un título en medicina clásica china y naturaleza Pathak, medicina y ambas medicinas. La base de esa medicina es la naturaleza y nuestra conexión con la naturaleza, y es muy fácil ver qué tan rápido las personas pierden el equilibrio sin tiempo en la naturaleza. Una de mis preguntas favoritas en mi formulario de admisión inicial con nuevos pacientes es dónde encuentra su mayor sensación de paz y el 95% de las veces las personas dicen la naturaleza y así, cada vez, cuando la gente viene y se siente un poco perturbada o fuera de equilibrio, la principal recomendación es sentarse junto a un río o sentarse junto a un árbol Y, entonces, me siento realmente honrado de que Mary Krista sea la anfitriona de esta noche e igualmente es un honor tener a Nate Bacon aquí. Nate es una de las guías principales del Animus Valley Institute, con sede en Durango, Colorado, y padre de Bill Plotkin, quien tiene su doctorado en eco psicología, que es un enfoque bastante fascinante y centrado en el alma de la psique. Nate vive con su familia en las Cascadas del Norte. Y estamos muy emocionados de escuchar su nuevo proyecto sobre Rewilding Childhood y lo importante que es para nuestros hijos entrar en la naturaleza y conectarse con la naturaleza por muchas razones de las que nos sorprendería saber. Así que sin más preámbulos, se lo pasaré a Nate Bacon. Gracias, Nate por estar aquí.

Nate Bacon

Gracias Babbie Gracias por invitarme. Gracias Mary Christa.

Genial estar aquí con todos ustedes ¿Pueden escucharme? Muchas gracias.

Sí, gracias por esa encantadora presentación, Debbie. Muy dulce. Y tal vez lo primero que hay que decir es que, como señaló Mary Kristen, estamos haciendo zoom. Y probablemente hay muchos de nosotros aquí que nos estamos acostumbrando cada vez más al zoom, al menos en la medida de lo posible. Pero tomar conocimiento me parece importante reconocer especialmente el contexto dado y el tema de lo que estamos hablando esta noche. Lo que exploraremos juntos. Se siente importante reconocer que hay muchos comentarios que extrañamos al acercarnos o comentarios personales que eso no sucede, ya sabes, a veces porque no podemos ver las caras de las personas. Además, incluso más que eso, hay una pérdida de cierto tipo de presencia encarnada entre sí. Y dada la tecnología y las limitaciones de la tecnología, es un desafío, como señaló Mary Christ, o al menos reconoció, tener una exploración interactiva y atractiva juntos. Y, de nuevo, quiero alentarnos como lo hizo Mary Christa, a inclinarse en este formato en esta tecnología y, para que sepan, estar en este espacio juntos lo más que podamos. Y ya sabes, abraza la hermosa ironía de estar juntos en una computadora para hablar sobre lo salvaje y Y en esa nota,

El título de esta conversación que creo que fue enviado a todos fue la naturaleza de la infancia, por qué los niños necesitan lo salvaje. Entonces, la idea era que pasaría un poco de tiempo charlando y explorando ese tema un poco. Y eso sería una especie de metamorfosis en un espacio donde se pueden ofrecer preguntas y, ya sabes, percepciones o incluso recuerdos, preguntas y respuestas reflexionando preguntas empinadas que pueden o no ser para mí responder en el campo juntos, pero mi objetivo principal, especialmente durante este tiempo cuando estoy chateando y luego respondiendo preguntas o respondiendo a lo que sea que traigan a la mesa. Mi objetivo principal es hacer algo como remover un poco la olla, para evocar un, tal vez un sentido más profundo de esta pregunta de por qué los niños necesitan la naturaleza. O incluso a qué nos referimos con la naturaleza de la infancia. Hay un, simplemente, me encanta el juego de palabras con la palabra naturaleza, se usa con mayor frecuencia para describir algo que no sea, ya sabes, algo fuera de las viviendas humanas, o las habitaciones humanas o las ciudades humanas, algo que no sea humano. Y, sin embargo, también transmite un significado de algo así como la esencia de, y de esa manera, lo impregna todo y hay, podríamos, podríamos imaginarnos que en realidad no hay nada que no sea natural. No hay nada que encontremos en nuestras vidas que no sea del mundo.

Eso no es realmente lo que sabes que nació de esta tierra o del universo o de una parte de ella de una manera u otra, por lo tanto, todo es natural, incluso estas pantallas de computadora son de la naturaleza. Entonces, sabes que un poco de lo que quiero hacer aquí es expandirme un poco o quizás profundizar en algunas de estas ideas sobre lo que tenemos sobre la naturaleza de la infancia. O tal vez incluso más al punto de por qué los niños necesitan lo salvaje. Hay muchos más y más de estos días, libros y muchos más artículos que suscitan grandes razones por las cuales los niños necesitan estar en la naturaleza e incluso por qué los humanos evolucionaron. edades, todas las etapas del desarrollo necesitan acceso a la naturaleza, acceso al otro que no sea el mundo humano en particular.

y hay innumerables estudios, prácticos, muy, ya sabes, estudios empíricos impulsados ​​científicamente, con mucha investigación detrás de solo explotar en este momento en realidad sobre todos los tipos tangibles de formas en las que podríamos hablar sobre los beneficios de estar, en la naturaleza, en la naturaleza. ¿Qué pasa si comenzamos a desarrollar esta idea de que todo es naturaleza, que no hay nada que no sea naturaleza y nos permitimos ir por debajo de lo que es la historia más profunda o por debajo de estos beneficios tangibles muy prácticos? de relaciones causales uno a uno en las que los estudios científicos son realmente excelentes para señalarnos, ¿cuál es el patrón más profundo? ¿Cuál es la historia más profunda? ¿Cuál es la naturaleza de la colección de esos? esas ideas que están fluyendo en este momento. Así que ese es el territorio en el que quiero invitarlos a todos. Y eso es una especie de introducción a mi agitación de la olla un poco. Pero con suerte, tienes ganas de ir allí con nosotros. Así que por favor ven.

Quiero presentar solo un par de palabras que creo que son palabras importantes, pero también divertidas. Así que juguemos con las palabras por un minuto. La primera palabra que quiero presentarles es la ontogenia. ontogenia, es O N T O G E N Y. Y hay dos raíces de esa palabra, una es auto, lo que significa ser algo así como tener un gran sentido filosófico de eso y que Geny G E N Y el final de la palabra proviene de la misma raíz que Génesis. Entonces, el comienzo o el proceso de devenir. Así que la ontogenia significa que surgir la ontogenia es lo que creo que es una mejor palabra para el desarrollo humano. Esto se debe a que evoca este proceso, un proceso que siempre se desarrolla y que siempre está en movimiento.

Eso no es algo estático que en realidad no podemos señalar a la infancia y decir que esto es la infancia. Ese momento es un momento de desarrollo particular. Pero hay algo así como un desarrollo constante de un yo en relación con el mundo. Y ese yo tiene algo así como un principio y un final. ¿Y dónde queremos trazar esas líneas sobre las que las personas pueden estar en desacuerdo? Pero parece que hay algo verdadero acerca de nuestra conciencia en nuestros cuerpos como organismos y no solo cierto para nosotros, en nuestros ciertos estilos de conciencia y cuerpos, sino para todos los que viven. seres, que hay una especie de entrada y salida de lo que llamamos vida en general, en un sentido evolutivo de esa palabra que llamamos vida, eso es lo que significa estar vivo y así que aquí está esta palabra Quiero reemplazar el desarrollo o el desarrollo humano con esta otra palabra ontogenia. Y aquí hay otra palabra divertida. Raíces similares nueva palabra es neotenia tiene el mismo final, el eny, pero en realidad significa algo diferente. Neoteny es una palabra elegante que significa la desaceleración del proceso de maduración en un sentido evolutivo. Aquí hay una estadística que me gusta, es mi segunda estadística favorita. La primera, mi primera estadística favorita es que el 99% de todas las estadísticas están compuestas. Mi segunda estadística favorita, esta no está inventada, pero nos reímos de eso juntos. Es así que somos el 96% de nuestro ADN de nuestra codificación genética es exactamente lo mismo que los caballos.

Nos separamos de los caballos como hace 40 millones de años, algo así. Y compartimos el 96% de nuestro ADN con ellos. Y somos algo así como casi lo mismo que nuestra temperatura promedio. Algo así como 99 lo siento, es 98.6 es incluso más que eso. Es algo así como el 99% de señalar algo, me estoy olvidando de la estadística ya 99 punto algo por ciento de nuestro ADN relacionado con los chimpancés. Son nuestros parientes genéticos más cercanos que están vivos hoy. Nos separamos de ellos evolutivamente hace unos 6 millones de años. Aquí está el hecho divertido de que toma menos del 1%. Y tú y tú lo dejas en lugar de sentirte realmente pequeño, porque es un fractal como una fracción de porcentaje. Entonces, antes que nada, somos increíblemente similares genéticamente, ¿verdad? Eso es asombroso en sí mismo, pero concentrémonos en eso menos del 1% y explotarlo realmente grande. E imagine todas las diferencias entre nosotros y los chimpancés. Y, y aunque hay muchas similitudes, también hay muchas diferencias, ¿verdad? Y así, cosas como nuestro bipedalismo y nuestra capacidad para el lenguaje, y nuestros cuerpos en su mayoría sin pelo, o diferentes estructuras faciales, o diferente pigmentación de la piel, estas cosas que cuando miramos a los chimpancés que dicen, bueno, somos muy diferentes a ellos. No son casi nada de ese 1%. La mayor parte de eso, menos del 1% es nuestro Niamey. Es el largo período de nuestra ontogenia de nuestra inmadurez de la fase de nuestra ontogenia donde nos encontramos antes de madurar completamente. Entonces, lo que podríamos llamar esto Infancia En este sentido, es una realidad fascinante que somos una especie que gasta una cantidad excesiva de su vida útil, siendo entre comillas, inmadura, lo que significa que aún no se ha desarrollado completamente en un adulto de la especie.

Unknown Speaker

Y ese es un hecho realmente sorprendente. Y en realidad es realmente curioso y misterioso, y tiene muchas implicaciones evolutivas. Y con suerte, lo sabré, evocaré a algunos en nuestra conversación esta noche, si no un poquito aquí en unos minutos. Pero entonces, agárrate a esa pregunta. ¿Por qué? Y no voy a fingir que tengo todas las respuestas, pero sí quiero señalar algunos hilos particulares del misterio de por qué tenemos una infancia tan larga y alargada. Bien, entonces hay una relación entre nuestra ontogenia y nuestra neotenia que tiene entre eso y lo que me gusta llamar nuestras expectativas evolutivas. De qué se trata el mundo que esperamos, no conscientemente, sino que esperamos que el mundo sea verdadero. Que a través de nuestra herencia evolutiva, no solo cuando los primates se vuelven humanos, sino como saben, desde los inicios de la vida, las bacterias unicelulares, siguiendo la línea de protistas y mohos de limo, y luego están emergiendo en el linaje animal y cientos de millones de años de evolución animal que han evolucionado en una de las muchas ramas hacia nosotros durante esos miles de millones de años. Tenemos que hemos establecido un cierto tipo de patrón de expectativas evolutivas que debemos haber cumplido al menos para cierto grado para que podamos editar líneas de base para que podamos seguir viviendo. Correcto. Entonces, las expectativas evolutivas básicas son la nutrición y el sueño y cosas así. Pero hay más sobre un genético, por lo que las expectativas orientadas al desarrollo humano, evolutivas, que se han establecido durante estos millones y miles de millones de años. Cosas como la mirada de una madre en nuestros oídos infantiles, el toque de piel sobre piel, la succión de leche tibia en el pecho de la madre que están tan profundamente arraigados en nuestra humanidad, podríamos decir que están tan profundamente arraigados en nuestra animalidad. en nuestra moralidad, al menos, contacto piel con piel, el ojo que mira eso, que tal vez nombraré a una pareja y luego haré mi punto. Um, esa es una, aquí hay otro tipo de categoría completamente diferente. Así que escucha, escuchando tener un trasfondo de canto de pájaros en la mañana como un niño que acaba de aprender a sentarse solo sin caerse, tal vez unos seis meses de edad, aún no caminando, tal vez empezando a gatear, tal vez no explorando el suelo, la expectativa evolutiva de poder tocar y ser tocado por el mundo más que humano sabiendo que la madre, otros cuidadores, la comunidad, la tribu, o cerca, un sentimiento de seguridad, un sentimiento de pertenencia y el canto de los pájaros todas las mañanas, la salida del sol todas las mañanas, este patrón, la salida y puesta del sol, la oscuridad en luz. Estas son expectativas evolutivas en las que no pensamos, pero que son absolutamente esenciales para los ritmos, patrones y esencia de nuestra humanidad, de quiénes somos.

Nate Bacon

Y entonces está esta pregunta de ustedes, no solo cuáles son estas expectativas evolutivas, y no voy a revisar una lista enorme, solo estoy tratando de evocar en este momento al menos una idea del tipo de territorio que estamos hablando acerca de. Pero solo quiero ofrecer la posibilidad de que, cuando no se cumplan nuestras expectativas evolutivas, las cosas empiecen a salir mal, que haya consecuencias. Y

y, ya sabes, las grandes consecuencias son la muerte. Pero hay consecuencias mucho más pequeñas y son las que tendemos a pasar por alto. Porque tenemos una manera en nuestra cultura contemporánea de decir simplemente, oh, si, si el niño está vivo, ¿está bien? O al menos mi bebé está sano. Y luego incluso tenemos pequeñas definiciones de lo que realmente es la salud. ¿Qué significa prosperar en un contexto evolutivo en el contexto de nuestras expectativas evolutivas? Así que aquí hay otra noción rápida de plasticidad. Esto está muy relacionado con la neotenia. la plasticidad no significa el tipo de plástico que se encuentra en el cartón de leche, sino que es un término, creo que proviene originalmente de la neurociencia, eso significa que somos adaptables maleables, que especialmente en los primeros años de vida están abiertos a la impresión profunda. Y que esa impresión puede cambiar que no es que esos patrones no estén profundamente impresos. Y si la gente quiere, podemos hablar más sobre qué es el contexto de lo que realmente significa y cuál es la implicación. Pero quiero hacer un comentario rápido sobre esto, este baile entre nuestras expectativas evolutivas y nuestra plasticidad en el ejército. Esto es la desaceleración, el alargamiento de nuestra fase de maduración, de la evolución de nuestra infancia, el ejército con plasticidad, la capacidad de cambiar patrones arraigados, por ejemplo, patrones neurológicos, formas de cableado, vías neurológicas también verdaderas en inmunología y emocionalmente, cualquier psicoterapeuta también conoce este fenómeno. Um

bueno, hay un baile entre estas cosas y nuestras expectativas evolutivas. La compensación por esta gran capacidad de plasticidad es que es una parte inherente del alargamiento de nuestra infancia evolutivamente. plasticidad como resultado de eso. La compensación del riesgo es una mayor vulnerabilidad al pathos, una mayor vulnerabilidad a, para que se establezcan cuatro patrones en ese largo período de inmadurez que funcionan lo suficientemente bien como para mantener la vida. Pero no funciona lo suficientemente bien en un contexto a largo plazo, en relación con nuestras expectativas evolutivas. Y hay una gran cantidad de contextos o categorías de lugares en nuestras vidas que no son nuestras formas modernas contemporáneas de estar en el mundo. no les apoyamos fácilmente el significado de estas expectativas evolutivas, especialmente para nuestros hijos, pero también es cierto para todos nosotros.

Y

así que esta mayor vulnerabilidad, hay algo que hay algo realmente especial palpable, acerca de esto y así que solo quiero, ya sabes, hacer esta sugerencia de la línea entre dibujar un hilo entre ustedes, conocer algunos de los desafíos más grandes en nuestro Mundo en estos días. Y, por un lado, y nuestro proceso de desarrollo humano, por otro lado, son la ontogenia lo que sucede cuando nos desviamos lentamente, más y más lejos de lo que hemos evolucionado durante millones y miles de millones de años para

esperar

en nuestra experiencia del mundo.

Solo unos minutos más de posturas aquí. Entonces esta es esta frase, ya que estaba pensando en cómo podría querer orientarme o en la agitación de esta olla esta noche, nunca sé lo que voy a decir cuando hago este tipo de cosas que me gusta más o menos ser espontáneo. Mi favorito es cuando realmente puedo mirarlos a los ojos y sentir su lenguaje corporal y luego ver lo que quiere venir. Pero ya sabes, haciendo lo mejor con eso. Pero mientras imaginaba algo del territorio al que podría invitarnos esta noche, estaba pensando en esta frase que proviene de uno de mis libros favoritos que leí hace años y años por David Abraham. El libro se llama hechizo de lo sensual y las frases, la versión corta de la frase que proviene de una oración mucho más larga, y en realidad te voy a leer la mitad del párrafo aquí en un minuto, pero la frase es contacto y convivencia. Así que quiero evocar en el contexto de todo lo que he dicho. Hasta ahora, esta noción o esta posibilidad de contacto, y la convivencia con el otro mundo que no es humano, es esencial para nuestras vidas de tal manera que realmente no entendemos estos días que probablemente no podamos entender realmente. Incluso con todas las herramientas y posibilidades de la ciencia y otros modos de exploración que realmente no podemos entender la naturaleza profunda e incrustada de nuestras vidas en el mundo y cuánto realmente necesitamos en el sentido más amplio de esa palabra, cuánto necesitamos contacto y convivencia con el mundo que no sea humano.

Bien, bueno, aquí hay un medio párrafo de David Abraham, esto es lo que él llamaría la tesis de este libro en una masa de abstracciones, nuestra atención hipnotizada por una gran cantidad de tecnologías creadas por el hombre que solo nos reflejan de vuelta a Nosotros mismos. hipnotizado por una gran cantidad de tecnologías hechas por el hombre que solo nos reflejan a nosotros mismos. Es muy fácil para nosotros olvidar nuestra herencia carnal en una matriz de sensaciones y sensibilidades más que humana. Nuestros cuerpos se han formado en delicada reciprocidad con las múltiples texturas, sonidos y formas de una Tierra animada. Nuestros ojos han evolucionado de manera sutil e interactiva con otros ojos a medida que nuestros oídos están en sintonía con su propia estructura, con el aullido de los lobos y el bocinazo de los gansos para desconectarnos de estas otras voces, para continuar con nuestros estilos de vida, para condenar estos otras sensibilidades al olvido de la extinción es robarles a nuestros propios sentidos su integridad. Para robarle a nuestras mentes su coherencia, somos humanos solo en contacto en una convivencia con lo que no es humano. Apagarnos de estas otras voces es robar nuestros propios sentidos de su integridad y robar nuestras mentes de su coherencia. Somos humanos solo en contacto y convivencia con lo que no es humano.

En este libro, da vida a una frase que es bastante común, al menos en algunos círculos ahora, que es más que el mundo humano. Quizás algunos de ustedes hayan escuchado esa frase. Eso es de David Abrams en este libro, The More Than Human World, con lo que quiso decir, y quiero decir, cuando lo digo, más que el mundo humano significa lo otro que el mundo humano y el mundo humano, que creo que es realmente lo que el corazón Su libro es, es, trata sobre nuestra relación con el otro en el mundo humano, pero lo que él dice una y otra vez es que necesitamos una participación relacional profunda y encarnada en el mundo más que humano. Así que no excluimos a la comunidad humana de ninguna manera que necesitamos, ya que estaba evocando con el bebé en el pecho de la madre y la mirada fija. Necesitamos contacto y convivencia con ellos más que el mundo humano. Y resulta que lo que es bueno para nuestro ya sabes, como él lo expresa, nuestras mentes son coherentes, lo que es bueno para nuestra psicología, lo que es bueno para nuestro espíritu es también lo que es bueno para nuestro desarrollo fisiológico. También es lo que es bueno para nuestro desarrollo kinestésico para nuestra capacidad para que usted sepa, tenga equilibrio, fuerza y ​​coordinación en el mundo en el que surge el juego salvaje como en la infancia. También es lo que es cierto para nosotros, inmunológicamente. Toda la investigación sobre nuestros microbiomas y la Fundación microbiótica de la vida en la tierra tal como es, nos señala hacia el contacto y la convivencia con la tierra como el principal impulsor de la salud humana. Y así está esto, existe este tipo de Fundación subyacente masiva, subyacente, no solo de nuestra salud, sino también de nuestra salud, nuestra capacidad de ser seres humanos saludables, físicos, psicológicos, incluso espiritualmente vibrantes y prósperos. Tierra, la base de eso en todas estas áreas de nuestro ser, son todos iguales y todos en mis ojos en mi lectura de patrones, todos se reducen a esto, esto, al contacto y la convivencia. Necesitamos la tierra No somos visitantes en la tierra, no fuimos plantados aquí en ciudades, necesitamos la tierra, necesitamos contacto con la tierra con otro mundo que no sea el humano. Debido a que nuestro contacto con el otro mundo que no es humano con el mundo más que humano, dirán, nuestro compromiso relacional con el mundo es cómo incorporamos el mundo para hacer un yo. Ese es el proceso de desarrollo humano, es una incorporación del mundo. Es un desarrollo relacional de un yo en relación con el mundo. Y un yo solo está hecho, solo existe en relación con todo lo demás, no hay nada aislado. Pero un yo no puede hacerse de forma aislada. Un ser es inherentemente relacional, ya sea un ser humano o cualquier otro tipo de ser. Todo es lo que es en virtud de su relación con todo lo demás. Y en nosotros, nosotros mismos, nuestros cuerpos, nuestras psiques, nos desarrollamos en un contexto relacional de contacto y convivencia con el mundo más que humano. Esa es mi teoria. Esa es mi tesis. Eso es lo que probablemente voy a seguir, aunque algunos de ustedes podrían tratar de convencerme de que no lo haga, pero ya veremos. Quiero decir, podría seguir chateando por siempre y para siempre. Pero abrámoslo aquí, Mary Christa. Y Babbie, tienes que detenerme. Solo seguiré hablando. Así que te lo voy a pasar.

Mary Christa Smith

Gracias Nate. Yo, ya sabes, has evocado como dijiste, agitaste la olla. Tantos pensamientos que he tenido, y en muchas direcciones diferentes. Una de las cosas que dijiste, que es interesante, es que nos gusta separarnos como los humanos y la naturaleza. Y mi computadora no es la naturaleza y la naturaleza está afuera y usted comenzó esta conversación esta noche diciendo: No, en realidad todo es naturaleza. Todo viene de la Madre Tierra misma. Y entonces podemos pensar que nuestras computadoras no son la naturaleza, pero en realidad lo son. Y pienso en eso, junto con la plasticidad de nuestros, nuestros cerebros y nuestros seres humanos y trabajar en la prevención, una de las cosas que escucho y veo es esta gran, gran preocupación por la naturaleza adictiva de la electrónica, especialmente cuando esa se convierte en la forma principal que niños pequeños, adolescentes, todos nosotros y que interactuamos con nuestra electrónica y ya sabes, he leído algunos estudios interesantes. Hable con expertos que están demostrando ahora que los bebés cuando se les da electrónica se vincularán con el dispositivo electrónico en lugar de con sus padres, sus cuidadores, lo que sea que tengan. Entonces, hay algo realmente inquietante y poderoso en mi mente que está sucediendo allí cuando se trata de nuestra expectativa evolutiva sobre la facilidad y la conexión gay, y si eso está sucediendo en el mundo electrónico, las implicaciones para eso en la infancia y para nuestra ongegenia, ontogenia y nuestro desarrollo. Y tú y yo simplemente tiraremos esto porque surgió cuando hablabas del canto de los pájaros. Y hay algo tan profundo que me da escalofríos pensar en el canto de los pájaros en la mañana, y leí una historia que durante COVID y durante la estadía en el hogar ordenan que haya personas de 80 años que oyeron pájaros. No escuché desde su infancia, como si de repente algo se desacelerara lo suficiente. Y no podíamos ir y hacer todas las cosas que parecía al menos donde vivo en Park City, en el condado de Summit, esto giraba hacia la naturaleza, este lugar de santuario y refugio en la curación porque no había nada más en lo que pudiéramos participar realmente. sentí que la gente tenía una idea de cómo eran las cosas antes de estar tan ocupados y tecnológicamente motivados y, al mismo tiempo, a nuestros hijos se les pidió en la escuela que aprendieran todo en la computadora. Solo existe esta yuxtaposición o paradoja muy interesante de lo que está sucediendo ahora. Así que realmente no tengo una pregunta que ir con todo eso. Pero ya sabes, estoy preocupado por la conexión con los dispositivos que está sucediendo y las implicaciones de eso para nuestros hijos. Y veo a varias personas en esta llamada, y estoy muy feliz de verlos a todos aquí que trabajan con niños y trabajan con ellos en la naturaleza, muchas personas en esta llamada y me pregunto si podrían hablar con ellos. que estas personas que tienen la oportunidad de trabajar realmente con familias y niños, ¿qué pueden hacer? ¿Y qué necesitan saber y pensar?

Nate Bacon

Sí, gracias Mary Christa. Entonces esa es una gran pregunta. Y, y es un tema tan relevante de preocupación o no preocupación, dependiendo de a quién le pregunte. Y sí, así que una forma en que considero mi enfoque de la infancia y el desarrollo infantil, el desarrollo humano en general es como un enfoque de sistemas. Y para usar algún lenguaje de sistemas hay un bucle de retroalimentación. que se crean, ya sean neurológicos o, ya sabes, siempre son algo más que neurológicos. Pero ese es el que tiene sentido para la mayoría de las personas. Entonces somos nosotros, y hay mucha investigación al respecto. Entonces, de eso es de lo que terminamos hablando, ya sabes, de una especie de tipo científico reduccionista, pero solo diremos de manera general, hay circuitos de retroalimentación que son tanto de nuestros cuerpos como de nuestras mentes.

Que estos comentarios repiten que cuando nos atascamos, los construimos, nos atascamos en ellos, eso es lo que llamamos adicción. Y, sí, creo que tal como lo estás señalando, hay una mayor plasticidad o tal vez no aumentada, pero es la más alta, básicamente, con algunas con cierto margen de maniobra aquí como una declaración general, cuanto más joven eres, más plástico son nuestros seres. Y que son buenas y malas noticias al hablar sobre cosas como lo que estás evocando, diré por qué en un momento. Pero solo para evocar lo que leí de David Abrams nuevamente, que su línea de nuestras atenciones hipnotizada por una gran cantidad de tecnologías hechas por humanos que solo nos reflejan de vuelta a nosotros mismos. Entonces, si solo nos están reflejando a nosotros mismos, que es esencialmente lo que tienen razón, Marshall McLuhan, el gran pensador de las comunicaciones sociales de hace muchas décadas. Dijo que el medio es el mensaje y esto fue mucho antes. Esto es antes de las pantallas mucho menos antes de las redes sociales y en los juegos de computadora y cosas así, el medio es el mensaje por el que quiso decir que el contenido es secundario. La forma en que se entrega es lo que tiene más impacto. Y, y, ya sabes, sí, podemos decir que, si sabes, ver un documental sobre la naturaleza es probablemente más evocador para nuestras expectativas evolutivas, entonces, ya sabes, una gran cantidad de cualquier otro tipo de cosas que pueden suceder en la pantalla. Pero especialmente para un niño, para un niño pequeño, son el, el reflejo sigue siendo algo creado por el ser humano, reflejando nuestra propia humanidad hacia nosotros, reflejando y nuestra humanidad en este tipo de circuito de retroalimentación. Entonces, no es solo un ciclo de retroalimentación de adicción. Es un ciclo de retroalimentación de dónde está nuestra atención. ¿A qué se ofrece nuestra atención? Existe otro concepto de neurociencia que es la activación sensorial, que es una forma elegante de decir qué información llega a nuestra conciencia y qué información no llega a través de nuestra conciencia. Por lo tanto, las cosas que consideramos importantes son las que consideramos importantes, por lo que aprendemos a prestar nuestra atención. Y si y de niños aprendemos a prestar atención a las partes del mundo que las demás personas de nuestra cultura, especialmente nuestros padres y nuestras familias, comunidades.

Aprendimos de ellos como oh, vale la pena prestar atención a este vasto mundo. Eso es incluso justo afuera de nuestras puertas. Ni siquiera lo sabes, como el próximo estado o país, no solo la selva tropical del Amazonas. Estoy hablando de las hojas de las arañas que se arrastran por la corteza de los árboles de color lila a las afueras de mi puerta, para el For, especialmente para un niño pero incluso para nosotros, los adultos, si estamos dispuestos, hay mundos dentro de mundos dentro de mundos de magia y misterio para ser explorado y encontrado. Hay presencias infinitas para ofrecer nuestra atención que son dinámicas, siempre se desarrollan siempre cambian. Y, y a lo que prestamos atención, si estamos dando forma a nuestras, nuestras mentes y las de nuestros hijos para que solo consideremos los circuitos de retroalimentación de reflejarnos de vuelta a nosotros mismos, en nuestro, en nuestro, en nuestras cajas de cartón o en el asiento trasero del automóvil, ya sabes, pasar de un edificio a otro en los ambientes con aire acondicionado, si ese es el contexto principal de la vida de nuestros hijos, y entonces, incluso entonces, sabes la palabra del día Y, ya sabes, la textura de las paredes o el olor de los libros se reemplazan con esto que hace que refleje, nos recuerdan de cierta manera que perdemos tanta capacidad sensual, hay una estimulación visual, Pero ahí hemos perdido el olor. Hay algo de sensación de audio, pero es que tiene una calidad que falta, porque la presencia se ha ido la presencia del mundo, ese ciclo de retroalimentación de simplemente reflejarnos de nuevo a nosotros mismos.

y luego imaginamos, déjenos comenzar a imaginar qué es lo que se está perdiendo en eso, de modo que todas las vías neuronales de donde va nuestra atención, eso es lo que crea un mundo. Eso es lo que crea nuestra capacidad más tarde para incluso percibir que hay más en el mundo que este cierto estilo de ser al que nos hemos acostumbrado, y se hace cada vez más difícil a medida que envejecemos reconocer a los niños, lo hermoso de nuestra plasticidad. es para niños, siempre en algún lugar profundo y es cierto para todos nosotros, pero es más accesible como niños, siempre en algún lugar profundo en nosotros, ya que Mary Oliver, dice el poeta, es una bestia que grita. La tierra es exactamente lo que quería. La tierra es exactamente lo que quería. Solo tenemos que aprender a percibir la tierra. Y si nuestra atención está hipnotizada por una gran cantidad de tecnologías creadas por el hombre que solo nos reflejan a nosotros mismos, nos estamos perdiendo gran parte del mundo y nos estamos perdiendo muchas posibilidades de en quién podemos convertirnos para qué y qué estilos de ser. podemos incorporarnos a nosotros mismos, convertirnos en algo que se desarrolle en algo hermoso en la vida y generar tener relación con el resto de la tierra. Entonces creo que es un problema importante. Si. Y para ser totalmente honesto, realmente lo hago.

Mary Christa Smith

Babbie.

Babbie Lester

Gracias Nate. No, esto ha sido súper interesante. Y para mí personalmente, realmente evocó mucho, así que una de las clases más formativas que tomé en la universidad fue la antropología de los sentidos. Y se trataba de cómo experimentamos nuestros sentidos y cómo culturalmente también es muy diferente. Así que viviendo en Park City, tengo oportunidades de experimentar y enfocarme en sentidos diferentes a los que viven en otros lugares. Y la importancia de eso. Y así, otros ejemplos a medida que hablamos sobre tecnología en los que he estado pensando a través de esto es, como nuestro gran proyecto que hice en lugar de un mapa visual, hice un mapa sonoro de nuestro campus universitario y grabé las canciones que están en el campus, y luego poner eso en un mapa de Google. Entonces, solo pensar y realmente puede ser impactante tomarse un momento para pensar en cómo experimentar un lugar. Y cuando te enfocas en lugar de hacerlo visualmente, que es nuestro primer lugar natural al que vamos, pero pensar en cómo suena, cuál es el primer sentido que desarrollamos, por qué hemos perdido el contacto con eso , o a qué lugares sabe, y luego cómo eso juega en tus recuerdos. Y a medida que reflexiona sobre sus experiencias en diferentes lugares y se enfoca en esos diferentes sentidos, cambia totalmente sus experiencias allí. De vez en cuando me relaciono con Actualmente, trabajo para el alcance de SOS, y somos una organización de desarrollo juvenil que conecta a los niños con mentores a través de la exploración al aire libre, específicamente el esquí y el snowboard. Y nuestro plan de estudios realmente se enfoca en el aprendizaje emocional y en tratar de enseñar a los niños cómo comprender y manejar sus propios sentimientos, y creo que eso es algo que realmente se relaciona con muchos de nosotros trabajamos. con usted. Y es algo que podemos enseñar explícitamente a los niños a decir: ¿Cómo te sientes ahora? Y si es solo, oh, me siento bien. Vamos a sumergirnos más en eso. Y cuando comienzan a comprender realmente todas estas diferentes palabras que tenemos que explicar cómo nos sentimos, y luego explicar cómo reacciona ante esos diferentes sentimientos y comprender cuáles son sus propias estrategias y mecanismos de afrontamiento personales, eso para nosotros SOS en la montaña , es realmente fácil porque experimentas tantas emociones diferentes cuando estás afuera y estás en la montaña para identificar si te sientes asustado en este momento, ¿qué necesitas? ¿Qué apoyo necesitas para reaccionar positivamente a eso? Y luego, ¿cómo podemos hacer la transición a cuando estás en casa cuando estás en la escuela, cuando estás en una especie de estas experiencias más cotidianas que los niños están teniendo estos días cuando estás sentado en una llamada de zoom? ¿Cómo podemos ayudar a capacitar a nuestra juventud y a nosotros mismos, estar presentes y experimentar las cosas de manera diferente? Entonces, para que vayas un poco más profundo. Entonces, no es realmente una pregunta, sino solo cosas que he quitado de esto. Así que gracias por guiarnos por algo de eso. Y Caitlin tiene una pregunta sin embargo.

Caitlin

Oh si.

Mary Christa Smith

Sí lo hago.

Nate Bacon

Caitlin, ¿puedo responderme? Um si. Gracias. Hola Abby, ¿y tú? ¿Alguna vez leíste a Walter Ong, cuando estabas haciendo el sonido?

Vale la pena mencionarlo muy brevemente para ti y para los demás. No es que ninguno de ustedes vaya a leerlo. Pero solo quiero, solo quiero que me guste, afirmar lo que estabas diciendo sobre el sonido como un estilo de conciencia centrado principalmente en el sonido como un sentido dominante en lugar de la visión que él, por ejemplo, Walter J. Ong, DIOS MIO. Escribió un ensayo que fue realmente influyente para mí hace años, llamado el mundo como una visión versus el mundo como un evento y estaba viendo la cultura oral en el mundo, no alfabetizada, por lo tanto, no lectura y escritura, todas las cuales para qué sonido es, no es necesariamente primario o dominante, pero es la forma en que su visión del yo y el cosmos, el yo y el mundo están orientados, principalmente, mientras que al leer culturas visuales nos orientamos principalmente, visualmente. Y esta cosa hermosa que él dice en ese ensayo que me encanta y que me resuena tanto es que con el sonido, tenemos una idea de la vida del mundo. Cuando escuchamos un sonido es como si el mundo estuviera hablando, como oh, algo está sucediendo allí. Mientras que con nuestras, nuestras generaciones, después de generaciones de culturas de lectura, hemos entrenado nuestras mentes para tener este tema Objeto Puedo leer algo, pero se trata de otra cosa tener este tipo de intermediario en nuestra conciencia y lo visual como si pudiéramos mirar algo y decir, oh, esa cosa no está viviendo, nada está muerto. Pero cuando el sentido del sonido es dominante, siempre hay una sensación de iluminación y si podemos imaginar estar en un bosque vivo, en un lugar salvaje y todos los sonidos, especialmente en esas horas crepusculares, todos esos suena ya sea la canción del pájaro en el árbol o ya sabes, durmiendo por la noche, las peleas tienen algo en la hojarasca en el bosque o, o el gruñido que sabes, alrededor de la roca, ya sabes, eso genera nuestra sensación de miedo . Siempre hay una conversación, ya que algo está sucediendo en el mundo. Y ese sentido no es algo estático. No es un telón de fondo para la vida, pero es un proceso de desarrollo del cual somos parte. Estamos inmersos en el mundo y en el mundo, en lugar de hacer lo nuestro y tener el mundo como telón de fondo en ese ciclo de retroalimentación. solo nosotros reflejándonos a nosotros mismos en una conciencia orientada al sonido, es una participación. Así que solo porque eso es un aparte, no estaba planeando hablar de eso, pero es algo tan genial que hiciste y que dijiste sobre esto el sonido. Así que gracias. Y la segunda parte de lo que está diciendo me recordó que quería mencionar específicamente eso, que esta noción de lugares y lugares salvajes, quiero extender que este sentido de la naturaleza, también lugares salvajes, por qué los niños necesitan lo salvaje, El subtítulo de esta charla de esta noche. Entonces, quiero extenderlo explícitamente y evocar el sentido de lo salvaje y lo que llamamos naturaleza no es solo algo fuera de nuestras casas o, ya sabes, al final de la calle si tenemos suerte o fuera de la ciudad, pero nos incluye a nosotros y eso incluye también nuestra naturaleza humana. Por lo tanto, incluye, por ejemplo, el desenfreno, de, de nuestras, de las partes de nosotros mismos de la otredad de nosotros mismos y de encontrarnos en una relación, las partes de nosotros mismos que podríamos llamar emociones, poder ser, ser en el paisaje salvaje de nuestras emociones para hacer el hermoso trabajo que estás haciendo para ayudar a los niños a ser más conscientes. Nuevamente, para ofrecer nuestra atención para crear esos, esos circuitos de retroalimentación para ofrecer nuestra atención al paisaje emocional no es diferente a sumergirnos en un paisaje que, de otro modo, podríamos llamar naturaleza, es, es un parte esencial de la locura del mundo. A través de nuestra experiencia humana, el paisaje emocional también incluiría, como nuestras propias relaciones con nuestros cuerpos, con imaginación, todas las dimensiones de nuestra experiencia humana. Así que gracias por traer eso y escribir

Babbie Lester

para eso, para mí, el concepto de lugar me parece muy interesante y algo muy específico he definido el lugar como esa intersección del espacio y el tiempo. Y así, ningún espacio es el mismo lugar en ningún momento. Y entonces puedes salir a la naturaleza, y es un lugar y luego una hora más tarde, es un lugar completamente diferente y que estás experimentando de una manera diferente. Y creo que eso agrega mucho valor, especialmente cuando pensamos en niños que también están en diferentes lugares, cada hora del día. Se están desarrollando y evolucionando constantemente en sí mismos y en quiénes son, por lo que colocarlos en diferentes lugares únicos es realmente importante, incluso si está en su propio patio trasero.

Nate Bacon

Es genial. Bien dicho Babbie. Gracias. ¿Tienes una pregunta? También Caitlin o una declaración? o solo te estaba poniendo en el lugar?

Caitlin

Sí, es como, es muy diferente. No es tan filosófico como cuando ustedes estaban hablando, pero yo, he estado pensando mucho. Así que trabajo para un Land Trust aquí en Park City y uno de nuestros programas llevamos a los niños afuera para jugar gratis. Y lo que quiero preguntarte es cómo, ¿cuándo decidimos que eso sucediera? Sí, cuando a los adultos les gusta perder su participación en el juego de la naturaleza y, quiero decir, porque todos sabemos que cuando crecimos, salimos a jugar y, ya sabes, algunos de nuestros mejores recuerdos son de jugar afuera, y entiendo eso Quizás ahora sea diferente. Tenemos iPads y cosas así y películas en las que podemos aparecer. Pero, ¿qué es una mejor niñera que eso? Ya sabes, en lugar de poner una pantalla frente a un niño, ¿por qué no enviamos a los niños afuera para que jueguen y digan: Ven a casa a la hora de la cena? Ya sabes, ¿por qué los adultos no lo son? Sabes, sabemos que esta fase de desarrollo infantil es tan importante, pero ¿por qué no estamos ayudando a fomentar eso y me gusta, lograrlo? No, no sé cómo, ¿sabes lo que intento decir? Pero como, ¿por qué los adultos no están comprando esto? ¿Que esta pasando? ¿Es suerte?

Nate Bacon

Sí, esa es una pregunta central. En este momento, creo que el cable no es solo para las personas que están interesadas en trabajar con niños, sino también, para el estado del mundo, en nuestro en el futuro de la humanidad y el futuro de la tierra. Creo que es una pregunta central. ¿Qué pasó? ¿Que esta pasando? ¿Sí, por qué? ¿Por qué esto se considera bien? ¿Por qué se considera esto incluso normal? ¿Por qué es por qué es? ¿Por qué es menos normal estar en una llamada sobre reconstruir la infancia, como por qué eso tiene que ser algo?

Caitlin

Si, exacto.

Nate Bacon

Y no hay una respuesta fácil. Y, ya sabes, indicaste algunas de las capas más recientes de ese despliegue. Ya sabes, las dimensiones tecnológicas de eso y algo del miedo que ha surgido por varias razones. Y, ya sabes, Richard Lewis, por supuesto, tiene un gran libro sobre algo de eso y otras personas han escrito grandes cosas. Jay Griffiths es en realidad quien escribió un libro en los Estados Unidos y se llamaba beso. Ella es de Gran Bretaña. Y creo que allí se llama un país llamado infancia, un libro mucho menos conocido que, por ejemplo, Richard asoma a los libros, pero ella toma esa historia mucho más profundo y mucho más viejo hasta los últimos cientos de años yy especialmente en su lugar de origen y luego la pérdida de los bienes comunes y las transformaciones de las sociedades, nuestra relación con la tierra y la privatización de la tierra, como dónde podemos ir, en realidad, como la mayoría de las personas tienen que recorrer un largo camino para llegar a un lugar salvaje. Y, e incluso en un lugar como Park City o donde vivo aquí en North Cascades en Washington. Hay solo millas y millas y millas de tierra privada a las que no tenemos acceso y allí de todos modos, hay muchas capas. Tener esa historia que se remonta, pienso mucho más y eso es mucho, mucho. Son mucho más misteriosos, y hay muchas cosas allí. Para mí es un efecto de bola de nieve y una especie de desarrollo de lo que sucede cuando nos adentramos en un cierto ritmo, culturalmente durante cientos, miles de años y ciertas formas en que ese tipo de retroalimentación de formas culturales se convierte en bola de nieve. entre nosotros y terminamos en un contexto donde, como un ejemplo de muchas de las cosas que son bastante, en realidad no normales, ya sabes, si simplemente retrocedemos y tenemos una visión más amplia de lo que es el mundo en que vivimos en, y de nuestras nuestras formas humanas de estar en el mundo que no son realmente normales, y tampoco están funcionando, lo que podemos ver en cualquier número de lugares que buscamos. Y, y una de esas es esa es la pregunta que estás haciendo, como, ¿por qué? ¿Por qué no puede por qué? ¿Que pasó? ¿Por qué son adultos? ¿Por qué es normal que los adultos tomen ese tipo de decisiones? Y entonces tengo muchos sentimientos o pensamientos sobre eso, y no tengo una respuesta específica, porque no hay, no creo que haya algún tipo de cosa puntual que desearía que hubiera, porque entonces podríamos ir a esa cosa y cambiarla, ¿verdad? . Pero una cosa que creo que es importante es comenzar a crear una nueva bola de nieve, y eso está sucediendo, personas como usted y Abby están haciendo el trabajo que usted está haciendo y ayudando a crear un nuevo tipo de bola de nieve. . Y ya sabes, estamos todos aquí juntos, empacando un poco más, empacando un poco más. Entonces, para que otros tipos de bucles de retroalimentación y vías para que podamos renormalizar para que podamos o, en cierto sentido, volver a imaginar qué es lo que es la infancia o cómo debería ser cómo debemos apoyar a nuestros hijos y cómo necesitamos que esto sea un Una pregunta realmente central es por qué me encanta la colaboración de algunas organizaciones del condado que cuidan organizaciones como esta, especialmente esta y Babbie, su trabajo y el mío y todo lo que están haciendo es que estamos hablando de un sistema. tipo de respuesta sistémica necesaria que es absolutamente esencial para nosotros reimaginar colectivamente porque lo que se necesita no es solo, ya sabes, personas que pueden llevar a los niños afuera, sino que es un restablecimiento de valores. Y esos valores tienen que ser combatidos y reinventados. Y luego, en nuestras culturas hay que remodelarlas a su alrededor. Y ese es un proceso largo pero absolutamente esencial.

Mary Christa Smith

Y veo que tenemos una pregunta de Susan. Susan, ¿quieres hacer clic y hacer tu pregunta?

Susan (guest)

Si. Gracias lo aprecio Entonces, no estoy en una profesión trabajando con niños. Bien, trato de conocer mi historia pero mi hijo ahora tiene 24 años. Tenía 18 meses cuando lo adoptamos. Nació en Rusia. Estaba bien cuidado porque estaba en un orfanato. He tenido un gran interés, un gran interés y todo eso está siendo disgustado en función de su crecimiento. Tenía un terapeuta cuando él estaba. Era uno de estos niños. diagnosticado con trastorno por déficit de atención, ya sabes, a hiper. Tiene algunos desafíos de aprendizaje, pero tuve un terapeuta especializado en neurología que me dijo cuando mi hijo estaba en la escuela primaria, dijo, creo que está en el extremo inferior del espectro del trastorno de apego. Y ella fue la primera persona que me explicó que la mirada de una madre en los ojos de un bebé establece caminos neurológicos y neurales, ya sabes, de apego y eran cosas que nunca nunca supe. Entonces, ya sabes, de alguna manera nos sorprendió el desafío que, mi hijo, vivimos en Park City durante ocho años, pero nos mudamos al sur de California desde el noreste, y me retiré y me quedé en casa. A mamá le encantó. Supongo que una de las cosas que quiero observar es que cuando mi hijo tenía cinco años en el jardín de infantes, trabajaba en una escuela pública. Los padres estaban enseñando a los padres, eran los ayudantes, y nunca olvidaré en esto es de cinco años, escuchando una conversación. Esto está fuera de Los Ángeles hoy. cinco años debatiendo qué era mejor qué escuela era mejor USC o UCLA. Y recuerdo haber visto a estos niños con la boca abierta pensando: esto viene de los padres, ¿de acuerdo? Y donde vivimos en aquel entonces hasta hace ocho años se llamaba asperities pal. Y es, y no soy, ya sabes, Park City. Estaba destinado a vivir aquí y luego espero morir aquí. Sin embargo, es como aparcar todo Park City, es casi como un clon de la zona en la que crecimos, ya sabes, mucha gente con dinero con hijos con derecho, mucha competencia en la universidad a la que vas a ir ir si no vas a la universidad. Hay algo mal contigo. Sabes, mi hijo todavía está luchando por encontrarse a sí mismo. Pero él La razón por la que nos mudamos aquí a pesar de que esquiamos aquí por años fue para que él pudiera ir a una escuela llamada Academia Wasatch que entendía a los niños que aprenden de manera diferente. Mi hijo estaba en esto en noveno grado, el equipo competitivo de snowboard. Siempre fue su mejor elemento cuando practicaba skate, ciclismo de montaña, esquí o snowboard. O esquiar. Creció pensando que era estúpido, debido al entorno del sistema de escuelas públicas, especialmente que eran estos niños. Sabes, los padres nos enseñan casi no tanto como ellos dijeron: Bueno, así es como debes comportarte, los niños modelan el comportamiento de los padres y tanto énfasis, y esto es como una de mis cajas de jabón. y otras cajas de jabón, ya sabes, electrónica y lo que eso hace, ya sabes, para los niños, lo que hicimos con nuestro hijo al final de cuarto, quinto y sexto grado, lo enviamos al campamento de verano en el norte de Minnesota, donde ellos y para el tercer año en que se encontraban, subían en kayak a Cal, a Canadá. Una vez más, estaba en su mejor elemento cuando estaba al aire libre y en contacto con la naturaleza. Y uno de los libros que me encanta, agosto es lo que se recomendó en ese entonces llamado último hijo en el bosque, salvando a nuestros hijos del trastorno por déficit de la naturaleza y cómo se relaciona con el todo, la importancia de Sabes, los niños simplemente están detrás computadoras estaban en su juego Game Boys fue en aquel entonces cuando mi hijo estaba creciendo. Y creo que es una pena que ahora tenga un nieto de 19 meses, mi hijo, hijo. Y estoy realmente interesado en todo esto, ahora él no fue adoptado obviamente, ni nada de eso. Pero creo que todo lo que estás hablando es muy crítico. Sin embargo, creo que es diferente en Utah, la gente tiende a hacer las cosas más al aire libre y a interactuar con la naturaleza. Sin embargo, creo que también son los padres quienes, bueno, si no vas a una escuela de la Ivy League, si no lo haces, sabes, hay algo mal contigo. Y para mí cambiar, sabes, quiero decir, no puedo cambiar nada, una persona puede cambiar algo, pero para mí eso es como un problema crítico en toda esta conversación, que es, ya sabes, un padre, ya sabes, permitir Yo era, ya sabes, soy mayor, mucho mayor que todos ustedes y crecí en las vacaciones de verano. Parecía que duró años porque ya sabes, salimos por la mañana y jugamos en la tierra y jugamos con nuestros amigos y no fuimos a casa hasta la hora de la cena. De todos modos, dejaré de hablar con eso, pero estoy seguro de que estoy de acuerdo y solo quiero mencionar otra cosa sobre la plasticidad. Antes de adoptar a nuestro hijo, golpeamos, hay médicos en este país que evalúan a niños de Europa del Este que han estado en orfanatos, y nunca olvidaré, un médico dijo: Bueno, estoy realmente preocupado por su cabeza. El tamaño es demasiado pequeño. Hablé con otro médico que dijo que había hecho más de cinco años de estudio de niños que venían.

Nate Bacon

Eso es hermoso. Susan Sí, gracias por eso. Sí, también tengo una, ya sabes, nuestra, nuestra capacidad de cambio, ya sabes, es nuestra vulnerabilidad. También es uno de nuestros activos humanos más profundos, creo. Y, ya sabes, eso también es como dijiste, para mí también. Es una gran fuente de esperanza para mí. Así que gracias por nombrar eso.

Mary Christa Smith

Me encantaría agregar algo a lo que dijiste Susan, que es realmente aprecio que hables específicamente a la cultura aquí en Park City en particular, la presión para actuar y lo sabes, y creo que se relaciona con lo que Abby y Caitlin también estaban hablando con ¿Cuál es el lugar donde hemos perdido esto como padres? Esta comprensión de lo importante que es para nuestros hijos estar en la naturaleza en la naturaleza sin supervisión, teniendo esas experiencias salvajes de verano, si quieres, y mucho más. Está ligado a la productividad. Y esto es lo que se necesita para salir adelante. Y ya sabes, en el pasado, Caitlin ha dicho que han tenido su juego libre en la naturaleza, oportunidades con la Cumbre de Conservación de la Tierra, y la gente está como, bueno, ¿cuál es el plan de estudios aquí? ¿Y qué aprenden los niños cuando están ahí afuera? Y acabamos de llegar a este punto en el que creemos que todo se trata de exámenes estandarizados y la universidad a la que asistirás y cómo puedes completar cada día con ser productivo. Y creo que es un gran problema y desafío, especialmente aquí en nuestra comunidad.

Nate Bacon

Sí, estaría de acuerdo con usted en eso, en que es un gran desafío solo en general. Y entonces quizás Park City sea una versión amplificada de eso. Pero creo, ya sabes, en un sentido amplio, un contexto amplio que

ese estrechamiento de

Babbie Lester

el alcance de nuestra humanidad en lo que se refiere a lo que se considera importante y lo que no se considera importante que en realidad no solo nos limita a esa esfera, sino que también hay una, en el pensamiento de sistemas y otros tipos de, ya sabes, teoría de la complejidad y todo lo que hay, hay esto, ya sabes, noción, este tipo de obviedad, la forma en que funciona el mundo, que esto, todos ustedes ya conocen esta frase, el todo es mayor que la suma de sus partes. Y entonces, cuando nosotros cuando limitamos algo no solo a sus partes y a nosotros y a ellos los separamos, sino que limitamos la importancia a solo una de esas partes del agujero. Extrañamos lo que viene de la interrelación de todos esos aspectos diferentes de nuestras vidas, que no es solo que nos estamos perdiendo estas otras cosas, sino que nos estamos perdiendo el tipo de confluencia de todas estas dimensiones. de nuestras vidas. Eso es realmente lo que, donde entra el verdadero jugo, es el todo de nuestras vidas. Y también me encanta, por otro lado, este tipo de giro del destino es toda la investigación que está surgiendo ahora, no solo de otros estilos de aprendizaje y que cada vez se valida más de varias maneras. Hay otros estilos de aprendizaje, pero también que ese juego libre, y especialmente el juego libre en espacios salvajes, en realidad aumenta la inteligencia y de una manera holística o la posibilidad de inteligencia y más como estamos diciendo un tipo de inteligencia más holística, no uno que se limita a un cierto estilo de aprendizaje y actuación y se encuentra en un cierto subconjunto de forma cultural que ni siquiera funciona tan bien, francamente. Y, ya sabes, estoy hablando de alguien a quien le fue muy bien en la escuela y que tiene títulos de posgrado avanzados y bla, bla, bla, ese sistema no funciona muy bien como uno de mis maestros, así que para hacer personas de las que valga la pena descender, para hacer seres humanos hermosos. Y es una pena que, eso, eso, que nosotros, ponemos tanto énfasis en una dimensión de nuestras vidas de esa manera. Entonces, sí, ya sabes, mi fuerte apoyo y gracias a aquellos de ustedes que están luchando esa buena batalla

Nate, realmente aprecio lo que dices sobre la bola de nieve y la creación de una nueva bola de nieve. No, y me parece que tengo tantos círculos en mi cabeza en este momento sobre las cosas de las que hemos estado hablando en términos de uno solo para salir a la naturaleza y, como saben, la gente ahora están descubriendo toda la filosofía o la técnica de shinrin Yoku, que es japonés para el bebé del aire del bosque. Y se ha vuelto muy popular en Japón, donde la técnica es salir a la naturaleza y activar sus sentidos, ya sabes, y ¿realmente qué estás escuchando, qué estás oliendo? ¿Qué vas a estar completamente presente con tus sentidos? Y por eso me encanta que lo que viene ahora es esto, ya sabes, citando una nueva ciencia de lo bueno que es. Para, para que estemos en la naturaleza y cómo lo sabes, los estudios demuestran que disminuye la presión arterial y, como sabes, ayuda con la ansiedad. Y la otra cosa que está surgiendo con mucha fuerza es que hay un libro que Barbara Marciniak llama mitad empoderamiento. Y ella está hablando de diferentes movimientos hacia un nivel diferente de conciencia. Y una de las mejores formas en que podemos hacerlo es activando la glándula pineal. Y una de las mejores formas de activar la glándula pineal no solo como meditación y enfoque en el tipo del tercer ojo, sino también escuchando alternando, escuchando desde cada aire. Y entonces ella dice que una de las mejores técnicas es simplemente escuchar con el oído derecho y luego escuchar con el oído izquierdo y luego escuchar con el oído derecho como una forma de activar realmente la glándula pineal. Pero creo que un cambio de conciencia y de lo que Abby y Caitlin están hablando es que creo que estamos en un momento crucial en este momento. En todo el mundo, un cambio de conciencia, ya sabes, parece que en este momento hay un aumento de la psique y esta energía psíquica de las personas que sienten intuitivamente que el curso en el que estábamos y algunos todavía están Simplemente no funciona.

Nate Bacon

Si estoy de acuerdo. Y sí, eso es, me encanta lo que traes con diferentes tipos de prácticas y, sabes, soy parte de mi trabajo cuando estamos en persona. Nosotros, las personas en sus procesos experienciales que evocan estas dimensiones de nuestra humanidad y me encanta hacer exploraciones sensoriales, meditaciones como esa. Y hacerlo con sonido es uno de mis favoritos. Y me encanta aprender. No sabía eso sobre la glándula pineal. Eso es genial. Gracias por compartirlo.

Y solo quiero mencionar que solo hay una, me parece divertida y de una manera muy dulce, tierna y hermosa como estas. Como te reías de estas nuevas prácticas nuevas, estas nuevas ciencias y, como sabes, me gusta hacer porque tengo una práctica de baño en el bosque. Tenga estudios que demuestren que es bueno para bajar la presión arterial, y es bueno para la reducción del estrés y es bueno para usted, para la salud del corazón y etc., etc. en la bola de nieve que de alguna manera se valida con el lenguaje de nuestra cultura actual, de tal manera que eso es lo que Susan acababa de hablar y MiraCosta ese lenguaje del mundo académico que pusimos en un pedestal y para lograr y ciertos tipos de pensamiento en el mundo que usa ese lenguaje y ese en ese enfoque, para validar y afirmar la importancia de estas prácticas en estas pequeñas formas individuales. Y luego, si también miramos la imagen más grande. Estos son todos estos, solo están diciendo, ya sabes, solo practicar ser un ser humano.

Y a mí, me encanta y también, y también creo que es, es importante y dulce recordarlo, eso es todo. Realmente, es como, intentemos recordar lo que significa ser un ser humano. Y ser un ser humano significa implícitamente, ser parte de la tierra. Significa estar en relación con otros seres, que todos juntos constituyen lo que llamamos el mundo, humano en otro que no sea humano. Todos juntos constituimos el mundo y siempre estamos conscientes de ello o no en relación con todo lo demás. Y en la práctica de ofrecer nuestra atención a aquello con lo que estamos en relación, ya sea la luz que entra por los árboles, los árboles son el olor de lo que sabes, el creciente vapor de la luz de la mañana desde el suelo del bosque o el canto de los pájaros o la punta de los dedos de su hijo en sus oídos mientras camina por la acera Solo el notar nuestra presencia incorporada en el mundo. Estas son todas prácticas que solo dicen oye, recordemos lo que es ser. Ser un ser de la tierra para ser un ser humano para ser un animal.

Babbie Lester

Y creo que para volver al pneus reconectado, ya sabes, antes de que Capra hablara de la red que no tiene Weaver y la interconectividad de todo. Hay un increíble video de YouTube que acaba de salir con Zack Bush y Sacha Stone. No sé si sabes quién es Zack Bush. Si. Bueno. Video fenomenal de YouTube. Cinco preguntas con Zack Bush y Sacha Stone donde habla sobre el microbioma y la agricultura regenerativa como la forma de ayudar a recuperar el mundo, no solo inmunológicamente sino conscientemente con un crecimiento en la conciencia y que este virus que hemos vilipendiado es en realidad el Lo que nos está ayudando a cambiar nuestro ADN como respuesta a ciertas sustancias químicas y, ya sabes, las prácticas de pesticidas y las sustancias químicas que hemos utilizado y que nuestro cuerpo ahora tiene que cambiar para sobrevivir. Y es bastante hermoso que su respuesta sea la agricultura regenerativa, ya sabes, y cómo entonces somos el microcosmos y el macrocosmos. Y cómo para cambiar nuestro microbioma, necesitamos que la tierra lo haga. Y necesitamos que la naturaleza haga eso.

Nate Bacon

Sí, sí, agregaré algo que he tomado durante años de lectura. Lynn Margulis y Dorian Sagan han intentado explicar quiénes son. Pero Lynn Margulis es una bióloga celular radical que explotó totalmente nuestras ideas de evolución en la tierra y avanzó más hacia un sentido de simbiosis y en lugar de una selección natural competitiva, de todos modos, es bióloga celular si murió hace una década más o menos y su hijo Dorian Sagan, y ellos, ellos, ellos simplemente escriben y hablan muy bien de esto. Esta noción de que, y otros han tenido, ya sabes, seguir su ejemplo en los últimos años, que a medida que nos damos cuenta más y más sobre el microbioma que habitamos, y también aquí es donde su trabajo realmente entra en el contexto evolutivo de , de cómo nos convertimos en quienes somos y cómo todo se convirtió en lo que son, especialmente seres multicelulares con células eucariotas, de modo que las células con núcleos en ellas, que todos somos bacterias que evolucionaron de bacterias que tienen 10 veces más ADN bacteriano en nuestro cuerpos que el ADN humano. Y que en realidad cada ADN humano, cada célula humana en nuestro cuerpo, tiene ADN humano en nuestro núcleo. Pero en las mitocondrias hay ADN bacteriano que, ya sabes, nuestro linaje evolutivo hace miles de millones de años. Y de todos modos, solo saber todo esto cambia nuestro sentido de identidad. Que nosotros mismos somos seres compuestos relacionales integrados. No somos entidades aisladas y hay un acuerdo de que hay un cambio radical en la conciencia que está comenzando a afianzarse y ustedes saben mis oraciones que es que se extiende por toda la humanidad y hace su trabajo de destronar a estos viejas estructuras de cómo pensamos de nosotros mismos, cómo nos consideramos a nosotros mismos y, por lo tanto, cómo consideramos la Tierra porque pensamos que esas son dos cosas diferentes, pero no lo son.

Mary Christa Smith

Bueno aquí estamos. Son las 8 p.m., hora estándar de la montaña, pero son las 7 p.m., donde se encuentra en las cascadas, Nate. Y así hemos llegado al final de nuestra primera, pero ciertamente no es la última oportunidad de trabajar con usted. Y como dijo Nate, anteriormente, ya sabes, tenemos el sueño de que, en algún momento, todos podremos estar juntos y proporcionar experiencias para padres y niños y nuestra comunidad para hacer este trabajo, de forma externa y experimental. Así que esperamos eso. en el chat, puedes ver que Nate tiene una página de inicio donde si estás interesado en mantenerte al tanto de lo que está creando, puedes visitarlo allí. Voy a enviarlo con un enlace a este seminario web y con otros recursos de la razón. Y vi una necesidad aquí, una pregunta de Caitlin y Abby preguntándome si hay un recurso específico que cita la información que pueden compartir con aquellos que necesitan el currículo y la información sobre la importancia del juego no estructurado. Entonces, si tiene un par de estudios clave que son digeribles, que podríamos enviar, me encantaría que me los enviara también. Y me aseguraré de que se envíen la próxima vez. Y estoy realmente agradecido por compartir tu pasión y tu sabiduría. Y me pregunto si tienes algún comentario final antes de irnos.

Nate Bacon

Estoy seguro de que solo lo sabrás, estoy aprendiendo a practicar el desvergonzado arte de la autopromoción como una forma de poner mi trabajo en el mundo, una de mis ventajas. Y sí, solo quiero darles todo el contexto es que mi trabajo durante décadas tiene décadas y que hace más de una década ha estado en desarrollo humano ecocéntrico, desarrollo humano basado en la naturaleza, diversas capacidades y ecología y Contexto evolutivo e implicaciones para nuestro proceso de desarrollo humano. Y he estado en este baile durante un año o dos, decidiendo crear un proyecto bastante sustancial, ya sabes, un cuerpo de trabajo específico para la infancia. Y es genial tener la oportunidad de hablar y conversar y escuchar a la gente de esta manera, y estoy haciendo esto con mi compañero y también estamos haciendo una especie de proyecto hermano. Que se trata de reconstruir el nacimiento, el embarazo y el parto. Ella es una partera, entre otras cosas. Y recientemente hemos estado prestando más atención al lado del nacimiento del proyecto y el proyecto de la infancia. Pero así que solo quería mencionar que estamos desarrollando este trabajo.

Orador desconocido

Y mientras desarrollamos plataformas y contexto dentro del cual podemos compartir lo que tenemos que compartir al respecto. Entonces, en algún momento, habrá un lanzamiento más grande de su sitio web y diferentes formas en las que puede acceder a dichos recursos y nuestro propio intercambio de recursos a este respecto, por lo que si envía un correo electrónico que MiraCosta enviará o hará clic en el enlace que está en el chat ahora mismo. Puede dejar su correo electrónico, es solo un lugar para dejar su dirección de correo electrónico. Si quieres mantenerte en contacto y estarás en una lista de correo electrónico y, por supuesto, no te enviaré un montón de cosas de ninguna manera, solo para mantenerte en contacto si lo deseas. Y solo ofrézcale mi agradecimiento por eso. En realidad, para las personas de YouTube que podrían ver esto. Solo quiero leerlo en voz alta para que puedan tenerlo en la dirección: HTTP https colon, barra invertida barra invertida t w n w url dot com slash or backslash rewildingchildhood, pequeña URL dot com barra invertida rewildingchildhood Bien, gracias por ese momento. Y gracias a todos por unirse a mí y por invitarme. Realmente lo aprecio y también aprecio tu participación.

Orador desconocido

Mary Christa y Nate, solo quiero decir muchas gracias por su tiempo esta noche y gracias a todos por estar presentes. Es realmente inspirador saber que la gente está entusiasmada con esto y que tal vez hay una bola de nieve que está empezando a rodar cuesta abajo y cobrar impulso. Entonces, Mary Christa, gracias por ser el anfitrión. Nate, muchas gracias por tu experiencia.

Nate Bacon

Placer, gracias

Mary Christa Smith

Todos ustedes. Enviaré un seguimiento. Gracias. Gracias. Gracias. Y sigamos con nuestra bola de nieve.

Babbie Lester

Gracias.

Nate Bacon

Gracias.

Upcoming Events

Translate »