One Trusted Adult with Leisa Mukai from Peace House

Sep 29, 2020 | Mental Wellness, Parent Education

The presence of one trusted adult is the single most important indicator as to whether a child suffers or overcomes adversity. YOU can be a trusted adult – learn how.

From this discussion:

Leisa Mukai – Peace House Leisa@peacehouse.org

Mary Christa Smith – CTC Summit County mcsmith@ctcsummitcounty.org

Mary Christa Smith  0:01
Hello, and welcome to our webinar series of the Power of One Caring Adult. I am Mary Christa Smith, and I’m the Executive Director of Communities That Care Summit County. And we are our community’s Prevention Coalition. And we work collaboratively across our community to bring you all the resources and best practices to keep our kids healthy, safe, and thriving. So I am delighted today to introduce Leisa Mukai. From the peace house, who will be sharing a wonderful curriculum and presentation for you and your team about the power of one caring adult. Leisa.

Leisa Mukai  0:45
Thank you, Mary Christa, this has been a community endeavor. And we’re very excited to be able to share with you the content today of the Power of One Caring Adult, every child is one caring and trusted adult away from being a success story. We’re all getting a lot of practice right now on resiliency skills in this time of COVID-19. What images Do you have of resilience? For me, some phrases that were used when I was growing up with the take a hit and get back up, or the Energizer Bunny that just keeps going and going and going. Or my favorite was when you fall off the horse get back on. These are some kind of old style ideas around resilience. They’re helpful. They’re deeply embedded in our cultural understanding. But over the past decade, there’s been a lot of research by social scientists and brain scientists as well on what constitutes resiliency.

Leisa Mukai  1:59
So I’m going to take a second look at that. We know that stress is a given. and resilience isn’t just bouncing back from stress. When true resilience occurs, stressors contribute to our growth, we become stronger and wiser, often kinder, and more empathetic. We learn to be flexible, competent, and adaptive in the presence of stress and resilience, however, is easily hijacked by fear. We learn to move out of our fear part of the brain, the amygdala, and into our pre frontal cortex. And how do we do that? How do we learn those skills? I’m going to visit this several times over the course of this presentation. I want to spend just a minute more on what resilience is. Resilience is the ability to overcome hardship. and resilience is a seesaw where negative experiences tip the scale towards bad outcomes and positive experiences to get towards good outcomes. If the seesaw  is tipped more to one side or the other, it can make it harder or easier to tip the resilience scale to the positive. So responsive relationships with trusted adults tip the scales from stress responses to adaptive and resilient responses for you. How do we teach and support youth to have this quality of resilience? A great deal of it is modeled and observed behavior. But we have some experts on this is Dr. Brad Reedy who is the founder and clinical director of evoke therapy programs. A very innovative in treatment. Treatment solutions for mental health concerns in teens and youth has this to say.

Leisa Mukai  3:59
The research tells us there is one mitigating factor for childhood trauma. It’s when the child reports they have one adult consistent in their life, who provides them a safe place. This is a place where they’re seen and welcomed as they are. This is what’s called a non anxious secure attachment. And this is also the foundation of resilience.

Leisa Mukai  4:28
It is imperative that you have this one trusted adult in the best of times, youth are faced with a myriad of risks. And the best of times wonderful one out of four children will be bullied. One out of seven children will be sexually solicited solicited online, one out of 10 children will be sexually abused before they reach the age of 18 90% of abuse is by someone a child knows and trust. Not a stranger, that’s in the best of times. But right now we are in the throes of a global pandemic. And it’s impacting women and children, particularly who are subjected to violence. We know that the risks facing youth is not only happening in our community, it’s happening in our state in our country, and of course, globally. I want to talk for a second about the the global view the 10,000 foot view of risk that children are experiencing right now.

Leisa Mukai  5:44
The Global Status Report on preventing violence against children calls for more government action and more of the dramatic impact of COVID-19. Half of the world’s children or approximately 1 billion billion children each year are affected by physical, sexual or psychological violence. These lockdown school closures and movement restrictions have far too many children and youth stuck with their abusers without the safe space that schools would normally offer. So now that more than ever, our children need our trusted adults to help them navigate these unprecedented times and easier isolation. Children need resilience in the face of these new challenges brought on by the pandemic. So the key is safe and trusted adults to building and supporting these lifelong resiliency skills, and trusted adults reduce the influence of a child’s risk for suicide and child abuse and bullying. And when the presence of a trusted adult needs to trauma to suicide, bullying and child abuse, youth are less inclined to self medicate with substances engage in risky behaviors, or act out aggressively in their community. There’s a distinction

Leisa Mukai  7:19
we’d like to make between a trusted adult and a safe adult. A safe adult is an adult who can get children help if they’re hurt or unsafe, if they’re there in a crisis. A safe adult doesn’t break safety rules or try to get a child to break them. For example, a safe adult won’t purchase alcohol for a minor as a safe adult as a person a child can trust to keep them safe. But what are the qualities of adults who have this more powerful influence of a trusted adult? Well, of course, first, they’re safe. They have they engage in safe, supportive actions. But they are adults who understand the risks that children are. these very influential, influential adults are safe.

Leisa Mukai  8:25
They’re adults who protect children, but they’re also adults who understand the risks of situations and act appropriately, who will intervene when they see a child in need. A trusted adult, moreover, is present in a child’s life over time and is committed to seeing the youth through challenges.

Leisa Mukai  8:52
A trusted adult provide safety and respect and as someone who children we talk with easily about their concerns. We know that feeling connected in our community to a trusted adult is a key protective factor and that our kids stay healthy and safe. And that helps them reduce some of the alarming childhood statistics we used earlier. A well known meditation teacher, Tara Brock calls it survival of the nurtured and I wanted to take a second here to say that these relationships don’t have to have a tremendous kind of time commitment behind them. It can be relationships that are a coach or a music teacher, but it can just be the casual neighbor next door as well as it is that relationship that the child engages with over time. I’m very fond of equations trusted adults equal community connectedness. Connection is key to prevention is when we think about our trust as adults, is a trusted adult different from a safe adult? Well, we’ve touched on that a little bit already. In some ways, a safe adult is a relationship that is emerging, and over time, it becomes a youth sort of child trusted adult. They understand what the needs, they provide a sense of safety and structure by their ongoing presence. That ongoing prevent presence also creates belonging, a sense of membership in the community, which leads to self worth, and confidence in their ability to contribute meaningfully to their community. It gives them a way, a mirror sometimes which support self awareness.

Leisa Mukai  11:10
It offers control over their life, a sense of control of competence, and mastery and relationships. And building these supportive relationships requires understanding the needs of youth. And we have a tool that we use in Summit County and tree Yep, throughout Utah called the Sharpe survey. serving youth is a critical step towards discovering their needs. This survey is administered every two years between the grade six and grade 12. According to the 2019 Sharpe survey in Summit County, our lowest protective factor is rewards for pro social involvement in the community domain. Simply put, kids don’t feel connected to the neighborhoods and the community at large. To the questions posed on this slide, my neighbors notice when I’m doing a good job, and let me know about it. In response to the question, there are more people in my neighborhood, sorry, there are people in my neighborhood who are proud of me when I do something well. And also in response to this, there are people in my neighborhood who encouraged me to do my best to all three of those statements, there was a negative response to this, indicating

Leisa Mukai  12:44
that our […] are not feeling connected. And we know that our community has high risk factors for substance abuse, partially due to parental attitudes that are favorable towards early use of alcohol. Also, we are a destination vacation destination community. And this also lends itself to a party atmosphere or in our values, kids report, our kids report, the number one place that kids report, that they’re not feeling connected to their communities, and this puts them at risk for substance abuse, and other risky behaviors as part of community connectedness is being able to feel directly or indirectly that I can trust the people in my community. There’s also a sense that I’m willing to put a lot of time and effort into being part of my community.

Leisa Mukai  13:58
And it’s also a value being a member of this community is part of my identity. It’s part of who I am and how I live my life. In a recent data analysis conducted by the Katz Amsterdam Foundation, asked adults to report on these questions of community connectedness, and parental attitudes toward substance abuse. So here’s a question, how do we connect to community and I’m going to give you a moment to just think about that. How do we connect to to our communities, we know that every five years the average American moves, so this means that there is quite a bit of experience behind us and leaving one community and creating new roots in another community. So how do we can best connect to our communities and acquire these skills. And this is where they have other group conversation. Like some of

Leisa Mukai  15:16
that is connecting with clubs, organizations, church groups, athletics, and the person next door. Even if that connection is assembly, it’s taking over a play to cookies.

Leisa Mukai  15:36
Young adults, who? Well, we have a lot of skills, individual life experiences that we might utilize when we’re moving to New communities. Not everybody has the same access or has a skill set. This is something that we’re seeing with young adults and our lot, Latin x community, who have a very low trust in their community.

Leisa Mukai  16:16
I’m going to reach out to Mary Christa here for a second to help illuminate this slide provided by Katz, Amsterdam. This slide is a reflection of young adults and some of their attitudes.

Mary Christa Smith  16:33
Thank you so much, Leisa, for including the slide in your presentation. So this comes from the cats Amsterdam foundation. And they gather together folks who are in the mental wellness space from all of their resort communities. And what we love about looking at this data is that it helps us do some comparisons with communities that are similar to ours resort mountain communities. And one of the

Mary Christa Smith  17:03
risk factors that we are looking at is related to connectedness in the community and lack of connectedness. And what’s interesting that Leisa is pointing out in this slide is that, that we know there are social determinants of health, and those are related to our race to our income level. And while community wide, we have low levels of connectedness amongst our youth, we see even greater disparities when it comes to people of color, and low income families. And so if you were to look at this slide, and just look at the top left hand chart, percent that are lonely by age, nationally, which is in red is the US and the composite have comes from in the gray three different mountain communities. And we can see that our Latin x community members, whereas the average person in one of our communities is 43%, when it comes to our Latin x community members, is 31%. So it’s interesting to take note of these disparities and to pay attention when it comes to our interventions and who we can reach out to and how we can help and be a resource to others to know that there are people who are probably struggling more than your average person and we should all be taking this into account when we are looking for ways in which we can intervene and help and

Leisa Mukai  18:44
this is such a powerful slide Mary Christa because it articulate loneliness by age and loneliness by by race, I can honestly say I haven’t seen information so well organized around a measurement of loneliness and a cap Amsterdam also provided some information and some data on who experiences deep highest rates of loneliness and it is Latinas. Like it isn’t difficult to imagine to empathize with how that their position, some may are disconnected from their families, second language learning some of the cultural barriers, maybe issues of transportation, child rearing, especially in the time of COVID where you can’t go out and mingle and have a lot of demands of care on your time while your support another beam through COVID-19.

Leisa Mukai  19:58
We also see this have a breakdown of other similar states, Colorado, California and Vermont. They’re similar. Pay similar issues as we do across the country youth, who are racial minorities and LGBTQ are less likely to feel connected to a trusted adult. And when I try to stand in their shoes, I can, I think I can kind of understand some of the challenges that might be there might be a fear of not being accepted, of not knowing who might mentor them through the charity territories of their identities. What groups in our community do you think are most likely to experience the most syce social isolation?

Mary Christa Smith  20:59
Leisa, can I jump in and just one more thing on this slide, which I think is such an amazing slide. And what we know from the data is that LGBTQ youth who do not have a trusted adult experience eight times the rate of suicide. And we also know that transgendered youth have nearly a 50%, nearly 50% of transgendered youth have contemplated or attempted suicide. So we know that when they do have a trusted adult, and especially a trusted family member, those rates even out across the population, they don’t have a higher risk. So the difference between higher rates of suicide among LGBTQ youth is directly related to the presence of a trusted and caring and supportive adult, particularly a family member.

Leisa Mukai  22:07
It offers them acceptance, and that is such a powerful understanding to have we address the needs of youth in our community.

Leisa Mukai  22:23
I’m going to move to the next slide. Mountain Community Leaders mentioned distinct challenges related to social isolation. local support systems are often limited to new residents. We know here in Park City, that most folks here are not lifelong residents, they have moved here, either to work or second homes, or by virtue of an occupation. Some of the statements that came out in the course of these data, questions was a lot of us came from somewhere else, which means we’ve left our families and our support systems, which could serve as a really strong protective factor in our mental health and well being as we know it. In our in Park City, we have a lot of folks who are displaced, or here temporarily working and our or vacation industries, social circles are unstable due to seasonality. And another challenge was social connections. I mean, it’s your party and risk taking culture.

Leisa Mukai  23:45
We are a very outdoors oriented community with just a myriad of outdoor opportunities at our disposal, and a lot of excellence in those fields. Sometimes, though, the risk taking culture has consequences. So if someone’s injured, they lose their community, the people that were providing them social support.

Leisa Mukai  24:19
So we need to think about is we as a community, other ways that we could cultivate healthy and supportive interpersonal relationships given our unique challenges.

Leisa Mukai  24:38
Nationally, around half of adults report a strong or moderate sense of membership to their community, nationally, they state that I can trust people in my community. I put a lot of effort into being part of this community. And being a member of this community is part of my identity. So how and where do people connect in our community? What builds a sense of social connected connectedness with values, and/or norms influence how people connect? Well, empathy, plus trust plus boundaries that go is what goes into creating a trusted adult.

Leisa Mukai  25:30
In summary, we don’t have to. We’ve looked at data that indicates that in our community, and in communities like ours, youth, particularly females, Latinx, and people of color feel disconnected. And disconnection can result in a higher incidence of suicidality, drug and alcohol abuse, bullying and child abuse. But there is a solution, when one trusted adult brings their life experience in the form of empathy and practical knowledge, builds trust and holds boundary with the youth, a positive transformation happens for that child. We don’t have to wear a cape to make a rowing difference in another person’s life. It doesn’t have to be a tremendous time commitment of being a an educator, for example, or a long term, a long term commitment of a club or an athletic team, it can be individual day to day connections, acknowledging the neighbor, taking out the garbage the person in the store,

Leisa Mukai  26:46
sometimes the bravest and most important thing you can do is just show up. We are offering additional presentations, on holding boundaries. And we are offering as I mentioned, additional presentations on holding boundaries and building trust. And we also are offering some really helpful templates on how to survey you so that you’re more prepared to meet the needs of the youth either in your organization, yet athletic or church or even just around a more loose around neighborhoods or book clubs. So some of these key questions that we have to offer are sample questions that is part of the template is

Leisa Mukai  27:51
is there a highly caring adult on campus? A highly caring adult is someone that you can go to for support or guidance, you can interject with any other word for campus could be your individual club or group.

Leisa Mukai  28:11
Another key question is do you have at least one positive peer to peer relationship or friendship? And the next one is would you like information about how to get involved at whatever this organization might be? We have this template that you can reach out to me Leisa at peacehouse.org or Mary Christa with Communities That Care for some help in learning how to meet the needs of youth that you are engaged with. From a youth perspective, a trusted adult is the difference between success and more overwhelming challenges.

Leisa Mukai  29:08
We have a number of resources that we have available for you, and we are happy to share this with you.

Leisa Mukai  29:19
This was a collaborative effort of Communities That Care Summit County, Peace House and Connect and I want to thank you for your time as we navigate these unprecedented challenges. And Mary Christa, I’m going to turn back to you.

Mary Christa Smith  29:41
Thanks so much, Leisa. This was truly a collaborative work. And that’s how we can weave together. Frames framework and a network of resilience in our community and what I want you whoever you are on the other side of the screen to know is that you play a part in that and you can take them active role in that. And it doesn’t mean that you have to be, as Leisa said, part of a huge organization and spending all this time. It can be the little things. It’s really the intention behind it and knowing the power that you have in small and large ways to influence the lives and the trajectory of our kids lives. So thank you for watching. This video will be available on the CTC website and YouTube channel CTC summit county.org. And feel free to reach out to Leisa and I to share this with your organization and to send along any other resources and information. We have a wealth and treasure trove of resources for you and we’re here for you. So thank you so much. Thank you, Leisa.

Mary Christa Smith  0:01

Hola y bienvenido a nuestra serie de seminarios web sobre el poder de un adulto solidario. Soy Mary Christa Smith y soy la Directora Ejecutiva de Comunidades que Cuidan del Condado de Summit. Y somos la Coalición de Prevención de nuestra comunidad. Y trabajamos en colaboración en toda nuestra comunidad para brindarle todos los recursos y las mejores prácticas para mantener a nuestros niños sanos, seguros y prósperos. Por eso hoy me complace presentar a Leisa Mukai. De la casa de la paz, quienes compartirán un maravilloso currículo y una presentación para usted y su equipo sobre el poder de un adulto solidario. Leisa.

Leisa Mukai  0:45

Gracias, Mary Christa, este ha sido un esfuerzo comunitario. Y estamos muy emocionados de poder compartir con ustedes hoy el contenido de Power of One Caring Adult, cada niño es un adulto cariñoso y confiable lejos de ser una historia de éxito. Todos estamos practicando mucho en este momento en habilidades de resiliencia en este momento de COVID-19. ¿Qué imágenes tienes de la resiliencia? Para mí, algunas frases que se usaban cuando estaba creciendo con el take a hit and get back up, o el Energizer Bunny que sigue y sigue y sigue. O mi favorito fue cuando te caes del caballo y vuelves a montar. Estas son algunas ideas de estilo antiguo sobre la resiliencia. Son útiles. Están profundamente arraigados en nuestra comprensión cultural. Pero durante la última década, los científicos sociales y los científicos del cerebro han realizado muchas investigaciones sobre lo que constituye la resiliencia.

Leisa Mukai  1:59

Así que voy a echar un segundo vistazo a eso. Sabemos que el estrés es un hecho. y la resiliencia no solo se recupera del estrés. Cuando ocurre una verdadera resiliencia, los factores estresantes contribuyen a nuestro crecimiento, nos volvemos más fuertes y más sabios, a menudo más amables y más empáticos. Aprendemos a ser flexibles, competentes y adaptables en presencia del estrés y la resiliencia, sin embargo, el miedo nos apropia fácilmente. Aprendemos a salir de nuestra parte del cerebro del miedo, la amígdala, y entrar en nuestra corteza prefrontal. ¿Y cómo hacemos eso? ¿Cómo aprendemos esas habilidades? Voy a visitar esto varias veces durante el transcurso de esta presentación. Quiero dedicar un minuto más a lo que es la resiliencia. La resiliencia es la capacidad de superar las dificultades. y la resiliencia es un vaivén en el que las experiencias negativas inclinan la balanza hacia los malos resultados y las experiencias positivas para llegar a buenos resultados. Si el balancín se inclina más hacia un lado o hacia el otro, puede hacer que sea más difícil o más fácil inclinar la escala de resiliencia hacia el positivo. Por lo tanto, las relaciones receptivas con adultos de confianza inclinan la balanza desde las respuestas al estrés hasta las respuestas adaptativas y resilientes para usted. ¿Cómo enseñamos y apoyamos a los jóvenes para que tengan esta cualidad de resiliencia? Una gran parte es comportamiento modelado y observado. Pero tenemos algunos expertos en esto: el Dr. Brad Reedy, fundador y director clínico de los programas de terapia de evocación. Un tratamiento muy innovador. Las soluciones de tratamiento para problemas de salud mental en adolescentes y jóvenes tienen esto que decir.

Leisa Mukai  3:59

La investigación nos dice que hay un factor atenuante para el trauma infantil. Es cuando el niño informa que tiene un adulto constante en su vida, que le brinda un lugar seguro. Este es un lugar donde se les ve y se les da la bienvenida tal como son. Esto es lo que se llama un apego seguro no ansioso. Y esta es también la base de la resiliencia.

Leisa Mukai  4:28

Es imperativo que tenga a este adulto de confianza en el mejor de los casos, los jóvenes se enfrentan a una gran cantidad de riesgos. Y en el mejor de los casos, maravilloso, uno de cada cuatro niños será intimidado. Uno de cada siete niños será solicitado sexualmente solicitado en línea, uno de cada 10 niños será abusado sexualmente antes de cumplir los 18 años. El 90% del abuso es por alguien que el niño conoce y en quien confía. No es un extraño, eso es en el mejor de los casos. Pero ahora mismo estamos en medio de una pandemia mundial. Y está afectando a las mujeres y los niños, en particular los que son víctimas de violencia. Sabemos que los riesgos que enfrentan los jóvenes no solo están sucediendo en nuestra comunidad, están sucediendo en nuestro estado en nuestro país y, por supuesto, a nivel mundial. Quiero hablar por un segundo sobre la visión global, la visión de 10,000 pies de riesgo que los niños están experimentando en este momento.

Leisa Mukai  5:44

El Informe sobre la situación mundial sobre la prevención de la violencia contra los niños exige más acciones gubernamentales y más sobre el impacto dramático de COVID-19. La mitad de los niños del mundo o aproximadamente mil millones de niños cada año se ven afectados por violencia física, sexual o psicológica. Estos cierres de escuelas bajo llave y restricciones de movimiento tienen a demasiados niños y jóvenes atrapados con sus abusadores sin el espacio seguro que las escuelas normalmente ofrecerían. Entonces, ahora más que nunca, nuestros niños necesitan a nuestros adultos de confianza para ayudarlos a navegar estos tiempos sin precedentes y un aislamiento más fácil. Los niños necesitan resiliencia frente a estos nuevos desafíos provocados por la pandemia. Por lo tanto, la clave son adultos seguros y confiables para desarrollar y apoyar estas habilidades de resiliencia de por vida, y los adultos confiables reducen la influencia del riesgo de suicidio y abuso y acoso infantil de un niño. Y cuando la presencia de un adulto de confianza necesita un trauma por suicidio, intimidación y abuso infantil, los jóvenes están menos inclinados a automedicarse con sustancias, participar en conductas de riesgo o actuar de manera agresiva en su comunidad. Hay una distinción

Leisa Mukai  7:19

nos gustaría hacer entre un adulto de confianza y un adulto seguro. Un adulto seguro es un adulto que puede conseguir ayuda para los niños si están heridos o si están inseguros, si están en una crisis. Un adulto seguro no rompe las reglas de seguridad ni intenta que un niño las rompa. Por ejemplo, un adulto seguro no comprará alcohol para un menor como un adulto seguro como una persona en la que un niño puede confiar para mantenerlo a salvo. Pero, ¿cuáles son las cualidades de los adultos que tienen esta influencia más poderosa de un adulto de confianza? Bueno, por supuesto, primero están a salvo. Se involucran en acciones seguras y de apoyo. Pero son adultos que comprenden los riesgos que corren los niños. estos adultos muy influyentes e influyentes están a salvo.

Leisa Mukai  8:25

Son adultos que protegen a los niños, pero también son adultos que comprenden los riesgos de las situaciones y actúan de manera adecuada, que intervendrán cuando vean a un niño necesitado. Además, un adulto de confianza está presente en la vida de un niño a lo largo del tiempo y está comprometido a ayudar a los jóvenes a superar los desafíos.

Leisa Mukai  8:52

Un adulto de confianza brinda seguridad y respeto y como alguien con quien los niños hablamos con facilidad sobre sus preocupaciones. Sabemos que sentirse conectado en nuestra comunidad con un adulto de confianza es un factor de protección clave y que nuestros hijos se mantienen sanos y seguros. Y eso les ayuda a reducir algunas de las alarmantes estadísticas sobre la infancia que usamos anteriormente. Una conocida maestra de meditación, Tara Brock lo llama supervivencia de los nutridos y quería tomar un segundo aquí para decir que estas relaciones no tienen que tener un tremendo compromiso de tiempo detrás de ellas. Pueden ser relaciones que son un entrenador o un maestro de música, pero puede ser simplemente el vecino casual de al lado, así como esa relación con la que el niño se involucra a lo largo del tiempo. Me gustan mucho las ecuaciones, adultos de confianza, igual conexión comunitaria. La conexión es clave para la prevención cuando pensamos en nuestra confianza como adultos, ¿un adulto de confianza es diferente de un adulto seguro? Bueno, ya lo hemos mencionado un poco. De alguna manera, un adulto seguro es una relación que está surgiendo y, con el tiempo, se convierte en una especie de adulto joven de confianza. Entienden cuáles son las necesidades, brindan una sensación de seguridad y estructura por su presencia continua. Esa presencia de prevención continua también crea pertenencia, un sentido de pertenencia a la comunidad, que conduce a la autoestima y la confianza en su capacidad para contribuir de manera significativa a su comunidad. Les da un camino, a veces un espejo que apoya la conciencia de sí mismos.

Leisa Mukai  11:10

Ofrece control sobre su vida, un sentido de control de competencia y dominio y relaciones. Y construir estas relaciones de apoyo requiere comprender las necesidades de los jóvenes. Y tenemos una herramienta que usamos en el condado de Summit y Tree Yep, en todo Utah, llamada encuesta Sharpe. servir a los jóvenes es un paso fundamental para descubrir sus necesidades. Esta encuesta se administra cada dos años entre el sexto y el duodécimo grado. Según la encuesta de Sharpe de 2019 en el condado de Summit, nuestro factor de protección más bajo son las recompensas por la participación pro social en el ámbito comunitario. En pocas palabras, los niños no se sienten conectados con los vecindarios y la comunidad en general. A las preguntas planteadas en esta diapositiva, mis vecinos notan cuando estoy haciendo un buen trabajo y me lo hacen saber. En respuesta a la pregunta, hay más gente en mi barrio, lo siento, hay gente en mi barrio que se enorgullece de mí cuando hago algo bien. Y también en respuesta a esto, hay personas en mi vecindario que me animaron a hacer todo lo posible por las tres declaraciones, hubo una respuesta negativa a esto, indicando

Leisa Mukai  12:44

que nuestros […] no se sienten conectados. Y sabemos que nuestra comunidad tiene factores de alto riesgo de abuso de sustancias, en parte debido a las actitudes de los padres que son favorables hacia el consumo temprano de alcohol. Además, somos una comunidad de destino de vacaciones. Y esto también se presta a una atmósfera de fiesta o en nuestros valores, informan los niños, nuestros niños informan, el lugar número uno en el que los niños informan, que no se sienten conectados con sus comunidades, y esto los pone en riesgo de abuso de sustancias. y otras conductas de riesgo como parte de la conexión comunitaria es poder sentir directa o indirectamente que puedo confiar en las personas de mi comunidad. También tengo la sensación de que estoy dispuesto a dedicar mucho tiempo y esfuerzo a ser parte de mi comunidad.

Leisa Mukai  13:58

Y también es un valor ser miembro de esta comunidad es parte de mi identidad. Es parte de quién soy y de cómo vivo mi vida. En un análisis de datos reciente realizado por la Fundación Katz Amsterdam, se pidió a los adultos que informaran sobre estas cuestiones de la conexión comunitaria y las actitudes de los padres hacia el abuso de sustancias. Así que aquí hay una pregunta, cómo nos conectamos con la comunidad y les voy a dar un momento para que piensen en eso. ¿Cómo nos conectamos con nuestras comunidades? Sabemos que cada cinco años el estadounidense promedio se muda, por lo que esto significa que hay bastante experiencia detrás de nosotros, dejando una comunidad y creando nuevas raíces en otra comunidad. Entonces, ¿cómo podemos conectarnos mejor con nuestras comunidades y adquirir estas habilidades? Y aquí es donde tienen otra conversación grupal. Como algunos de

Leisa Mukai  15:16

que se conecta con clubes, organizaciones, grupos de iglesias, deportes y la persona de al lado. Incluso si esa conexión es de ensamblaje, está asumiendo el control de las cookies.

Leisa Mukai  15:36

Adultos jóvenes, ¿quién? Bueno, tenemos muchas habilidades, experiencias de vida individuales que podríamos utilizar cuando nos mudemos a nuevas comunidades. No todo el mundo tiene el mismo acceso o un conjunto de habilidades. Esto es algo que estamos viendo con los adultos jóvenes y nuestro lote, la comunidad Latin x, que tienen muy poca confianza en su comunidad.

Leisa Mukai 16:16

Voy a comunicarme con Mary Christa aquí por un segundo para ayudar a iluminar esta diapositiva proporcionada por Katz, Amsterdam. Esta diapositiva es un reflejo de los adultos jóvenes y algunas de sus actitudes.

Mary Christa Smith  16:33

Muchas gracias, Leisa, por incluir la diapositiva en tu presentación. Así que esto proviene de la fundación cats Amsterdam. Y reúnen a personas que se encuentran en el espacio de bienestar mental de todas sus comunidades turísticas. Y lo que nos encanta de ver estos datos es que nos ayuda a hacer algunas comparaciones con comunidades que son similares a nuestras comunidades de montaña. Y uno de los

Mary Christa Smith  17:03

Los factores de riesgo que estamos analizando están relacionados con la conexión en la comunidad y la falta de conexión. Y lo interesante que Leisa señala en esta diapositiva es que sabemos que hay determinantes sociales de la salud y que están relacionados con nuestra raza y nuestro nivel de ingresos. Y aunque en toda la comunidad tenemos bajos niveles de conexión entre nuestros jóvenes, vemos disparidades aún mayores cuando se trata de personas de color y familias de bajos ingresos. Entonces, si miras esta diapositiva, y solo miras el gráfico de la parte superior izquierda, el porcentaje de personas solitarias por edad, a nivel nacional, que está en rojo es EE. UU. Y el compuesto proviene de tres comunidades montañosas diferentes en gris. . Y podemos ver que los miembros de nuestra comunidad Latin x, mientras que la persona promedio en una de nuestras comunidades es del 43%, cuando se trata de los miembros de nuestra comunidad Latin X, es del 31%. Por lo tanto, es interesante tomar nota de estas disparidades y prestar atención cuando se trata de nuestras intervenciones y a quién podemos acercarnos y cómo podemos ayudar y ser un recurso para que otros sepan que hay personas que probablemente están luchando más que usted. persona promedio y todos deberíamos tener esto en cuenta cuando buscamos formas en las que podemos intervenir y ayudar y

Leisa Mukai  18:44

esta es una diapositiva tan poderosa Mary Christa porque articula la soledad por edad y la soledad por raza, honestamente puedo decir que no he visto información tan bien organizada en torno a una medida de soledad y un límite Amsterdam también proporcionó información y algunos datos sobre quienes experimentan las tasas más altas de soledad y son las latinas. Como no es difícil imaginar empatizar con la forma en que su posición, algunos pueden estar desconectados de sus familias, aprendiendo un segundo idioma algunas de las barreras culturales, tal vez problemas de transporte, crianza de los hijos, especialmente en la época de COVID donde se puede No salga y se mezcle y tenga muchas demandas de cuidado en su tiempo mientras apoya otro rayo a través de COVID-19.

Leisa Mukai  19:58

También vemos que esto tiene un desglose de otros estados similares, Colorado, California y Vermont. Son similares. Pague problemas similares a los que hacemos en todo el país, los jóvenes, que son minorías raciales y LGBTQ, tienen menos probabilidades de sentirse conectados con un adulto de confianza. Y cuando trato de ponerme en su lugar, puedo, creo que puedo entender algunos de los desafíos que podrían existir, podría haber miedo de no ser aceptado, de no saber quién podría orientarlos a través de los territorios de caridad de su país. identidades. ¿Qué grupos de nuestra comunidad crees que tienen más probabilidades de experimentar el aislamiento social más sincronizado?

Mary Christa Smith  20:59

Leisa, ¿puedo saltar y solo una cosa más en esta diapositiva, que creo que es una diapositiva increíble? Y lo que sabemos por los datos es que los jóvenes LGBTQ que no tienen un adulto de confianza experimentan ocho veces la tasa de suicidio. Y también sabemos que los jóvenes transgénero tienen casi un 50%, casi el 50% de los jóvenes transgénero han contemplado o intentado suicidarse. Entonces, sabemos que cuando tienen un adulto de confianza, y especialmente un familiar de confianza, esas tasas se igualan en toda la población, no tienen un riesgo más alto. Entonces, la diferencia entre las tasas más altas de suicidio entre los jóvenes LGBTQ está directamente relacionada con la presencia de un adulto de confianza, cariñoso y comprensivo, en particular un miembro de la familia.

Leisa Mukai  22:07

Les ofrece aceptación, y esa es una comprensión tan poderosa de tener que abordar las necesidades de los jóvenes en nuestra comunidad.

Leisa Mukai  22:23

Pasaré a la siguiente diapositiva. Los líderes comunitarios de las montañas mencionaron distintos desafíos relacionados con el aislamiento social. Los sistemas de apoyo locales a menudo se limitan a nuevos residentes. Sabemos aquí en Park City, que la mayoría de las personas aquí no son residentes de toda la vida, se han mudado aquí, ya sea para trabajar o segundas residencias, o en virtud de una ocupación. Algunas de las declaraciones que surgieron en el transcurso de estos datos, fueron preguntas que muchos de nosotros veníamos de otro lugar, lo que significa que hemos dejado a nuestras familias y nuestros sistemas de apoyo, lo que podría servir como un factor protector realmente fuerte en nuestra mente. salud y bienestar como lo conocemos. En Park City, tenemos muchas personas que están desplazadas, o que están aquí trabajando temporalmente y nuestras industrias de vacaciones, los círculos sociales son inestables debido a la estacionalidad. Y otro desafío fueron las conexiones sociales. Quiero decir, es tu fiesta y la cultura de tomar riesgos.

Leisa Mukai  23:45

Somos una comunidad orientada al aire libre con solo una gran cantidad de oportunidades al aire libre a nuestra disposición y mucha excelencia en esos campos. A veces, sin embargo, la cultura de asumir riesgos tiene consecuencias. Entonces, si alguien se lesiona, pierde su comunidad, las personas que les brindaban apoyo social.

Leisa Mukai  24:19

Así que tenemos que pensar en nosotros como comunidad, en otras formas en las que podríamos cultivar relaciones interpersonales saludables y de apoyo dados nuestros desafíos únicos.

Leisa Mukai  24:38

A nivel nacional, alrededor de la mitad de los adultos informan un sentido de pertenencia fuerte o moderado a su comunidad, a nivel nacional, afirman que puedo confiar en las personas de mi comunidad. Me esfuerzo mucho para ser parte de esta comunidad. Y ser miembro de esta comunidad es parte de mi identidad. Entonces, ¿cómo y dónde se conecta la gente en nuestra comunidad? ¿Qué crea un sentido de conexión social con los valores y / o las normas influyen en cómo se conectan las personas? Bueno, la empatía, más la confianza más los límites que van, es lo que se necesita para crear un adulto de confianza.

Leisa Mukai  25:30

En resumen, no tenemos que hacerlo. Hemos analizado datos que indican que en nuestra comunidad y en comunidades como la nuestra, los jóvenes, especialmente las mujeres, los latinos y las personas de color se sienten desconectados. Y la desconexión puede resultar en una mayor incidencia de tendencias suicidas, abuso de drogas y alcohol, acoso y abuso infantil. Pero hay una solución, cuando un adulto de confianza aporta su experiencia de vida en forma de empatía y conocimiento práctico, genera confianza y mantiene límites con los jóvenes, se produce una transformación positiva para ese niño. No tenemos que usar una capa para marcar la diferencia en la vida de otra persona. No tiene por qué ser un gran compromiso de tiempo de ser un educador, por ejemplo, o un compromiso a largo plazo de un club o un equipo deportivo, pueden ser conexiones individuales del día a día, reconociendo al vecino, sacar la basura a la persona en la tienda,

Leisa Mukai  26:46

a veces, lo más valiente e importante que puedes hacer es simplemente presentarte. Estamos ofreciendo presentaciones adicionales sobre la celebración de límites. Y estamos ofreciendo, como mencioné, presentaciones adicionales sobre cómo mantener límites y generar confianza. Y también estamos ofreciendo algunas plantillas realmente útiles sobre cómo encuestarlo para que esté más preparado para satisfacer las necesidades de los jóvenes, ya sea en su organización, atléticos o en la iglesia, o incluso en vecindarios más sueltos o clubes de lectura. Algunas de estas preguntas clave que tenemos para ofrecer son preguntas de muestra que forman parte de la plantilla.

Leisa Mukai  27:51

¿Hay un adulto muy cariñoso en el campus? Un adulto muy cariñoso es alguien a quien puedes acudir en busca de apoyo u orientación, puedes intervenir con cualquier otra palabra para campus, podría ser tu club o grupo individual.

Leisa Mukai  28:11

Otra pregunta clave es ¿tienes al menos una relación o amistad positiva entre pares? Y el siguiente es, ¿le gustaría información sobre cómo participar en cualquiera que sea esta organización? Tenemos esta plantilla que puede comunicarse conmigo Leisa en peacehouse.org o Mary Christa con Communities That Care para obtener ayuda para aprender cómo satisfacer las necesidades de los jóvenes con los que está comprometido. Desde la perspectiva de los jóvenes, un adulto de confianza es la diferencia entre el éxito y los desafíos más abrumadores.

Leisa Mukai  29:08

Tenemos varios recursos que tenemos disponibles para usted y nos complace compartirlos con usted.

Leisa Mukai  29:19

Este fue un esfuerzo de colaboración de Communities That Care Summit County, Peace House y Connect y quiero agradecerles por su tiempo mientras navegamos por estos desafíos sin precedentes. Y Mary Christa, voy a volverme hacia ti.

Mary Christa Smith  29:41

Muchas gracias, Leisa. Este fue verdaderamente un trabajo colaborativo. Y así es como podemos tejer juntos. Frames framework y una red de resiliencia en nuestra comunidad y lo que quiero que, quienquiera que esté al otro lado de la pantalla, sepa es que usted juega un papel en eso y que puede tomar un papel activo en eso. Y no significa que tengas que ser, como dijo Leisa, parte de una gran organización y gastar todo este tiempo. Pueden ser las pequeñas cosas. Es realmente la intención detrás de esto y conocer el poder que tienes en pequeñas y grandes formas para influir en las vidas y la trayectoria de las vidas de nuestros hijos. Así que gracias por mirar. Este video estará disponible en el sitio web de CTC y el canal de YouTube CTC summit county.org. Y no dude en comunicarse con Leisa y yo para compartir esto con su organización y enviar cualquier otro recurso e información. Tenemos una riqueza y un tesoro de recursos para usted y estamos aquí para ayudarlo. Así que muchas gracias. Gracias, Leisa.

Join Us At An Event

  1. Strong Parents, Strong Kids: Parenting Workshop

    August 10 @ 6:30 pm - November 28 @ 7:30 pm
  2. Understanding and Preventing Violence in the Time of COVID-19 R-3 Disaster Drill Presentation Series

    September 15 @ 5:00 pm - November 17 @ 6:00 pm
  3. Fall Calendar 2020

    Fall Conference 2020

    November 10 @ 1:00 pm - November 19 @ 3:45 pm