Mental Health Mondays with Rob Harter, Executive Director of the Christian Center of Park City

Nov 17, 2020 | Coalition Strategy, CTC Blog, Health and Wellness, Mental Health Mondays, Mental Wellness

Rob Harter is the Executive Director of the Christian Center of Park City.  Meeting people at their point of need as an expression of God’s love.

CCPC is a Christian, humanitarian community resource center that helps improve the lives of people and communities through meeting immediate and basic needs, serving as a leading networker of community resources, offering counseling and care support, and giving hope to those we serve. Focusing primarily on the population centers of Summit and Wasatch counties, CCPC serves all people, regardless of race, religion, nationality, sexual orientation, ethnicity or gender. We require no membership, dues, or compliance with our faith traditions to be served by our programs and resources.

From this discussion:

https://www.ccofpc.org

Jessica Crate
All right, everyone. Hello and welcome to our mental health Mondays video podcast by Communities That Care. We are so excited to be here today. My name is Jessica Crate. I’m the visionary spokeswoman for Communities That Care Summit County and CTC, Summit County, our vision is truly a world of connection, and vitality where kids and families thrive. And our mission is to collaboratively improve the lives of youth and family by fostering a culture of youth. fostering a culture of health through prevention. So say that three times fast. I know I love this organization. And, and we’re doing a lot of great work here. And really in a culture of connection and prevention. We are so excited to have Rob Harter here. Rob is a nonprofit executive professional here in Summit County, specifically in Park City, he has such an entrepreneurial spirit, you’ll see a smile glistening all around our coast over here. But Rob became an executive director of the Christian Center, and also ccpc. And he’ll tell you a little bit more about that a humanitarian a community focused nonprofit organization, with a bold vision to serve as a leading networker of community services based in Park City. And since then, you know, over a decade, Rob, you have done some incredible work. And you’re you continue to foster such an amazing community of connection and events and things throughout Park City. So Rob, thanks for being here today. Tell us a little bit more about yourself. And your organization. And the really the initiative that you guys have the fight behind that. I know you love Park City. So fill us in.

Rob Harter
Absolutely. Well, thanks. Great to be on the show. Thanks for inviting me to be on the show. Yeah, I am super excited to anytime to talk about mental health and why Park City is a wonderful community and Communities That Care provides such a great catalyst to help us all work together. Yeah, so I’ve been here for 10 years, I it’s hard to believe from even that I’ve been in for 10 years, we moved from Colorado, the Boulder, Colorado area, but moved here for the position as executive director of ccpc, or Christian Central Park City. So that’s what brought us out here in the first place. And it’s been fantastic. Like I love it. It’s allowed this organization. When I first came, we had about nine paid staff. And we’ve really gone through a real huge transformation of growth where we have now 53 paid staff, we went through a major capital campaign about $9.3 million capital campaign. So our building expanded quite a bit, Park City. And then we have a campus in Hebrew as well. And then we have programs that reach out through the entire state, mostly right now with Native American communities, the go shoot community, on the western side of Utah, and then in the four corners area, with the Navajo Nation. And then we do a lot of different things throughout the state with collaborating with other nonprofits. So we really have become a statewide organization. It’s been super fun to see and to grow. And there’s been certainly plenty of growing pains along the way. But it’s been really, really exciting. And I think what’s been really interesting, Jessica is that, I think right before COVID hit, we were done with a capital campaign, which helped, we had grown up to a certain level where when COVID hit because we’re humanitarian community center, which we have two food pantries, we provide a basic needs assistance, which helps with rent assistance, or unexpected bills, medical bills, car repairs, things like that, when those things happen, and of course, then our mental health issues that popped up during COVID. We were primed and ready to go. Now we had to scale up our organization in order to meet the demand overwhelming demand for need for food, rent assistance, and mental health. But we’re able to do that and one snapshot would be over COVID, we’ve been able to give out nearly a million dollars worth in rent assistance, as one example. And then of course, we’ve served thousands of people with food. And then we’ve served hundreds of people with our mental health counseling and which I know we’ll get into in a bit. But it’s been fun. Like we have a great team, we have a great community that supports us, that really makes it possible for us to provide all these services, they support us financially, and through volunteer work. So I feel very lucky that we live in a community like Park City, where we get such a wonderful support from this community.

Jessica Crate
Well, we’re so lucky and blessed to have you guys part of our community and, you know, truly does take a village. And so having you is such an integral part of what we’re doing as a community and just seeing you serve and, you know, help people thrive during this, especially during this pandemic is is so key. And even outside of that you guys do a lot of work. So let’s focus more on let’s really hone in on that mental health aspect. So how do you guys and what are you focusing on in order to foster the mental health and wholeness in our community? What are some specific things that you guys are doing?

Rob Harter
Yeah, great question. So we just a little history too. So we started officially, our mental health counseling center that was a part and parcel of the Christian Center, just like our food pantry isn’t just like we have three thrift stores. We decided that eight years ago that we’re going to have our own mental health counseling that came out of the humanitarian center that the Christian Center was. And so my wife Leah, actually is the director and started as the director and start with that one person, and then we’ve grown it again, and we have now 15 staff that are part of our mental health counseling centers. So we provide a wide variety of resources. So a couple examples to your question. So we have two people on staff, my wife being one of them that specializes An EMDR. That’s a specialization for those who have gone through trauma, or those who have gone had PTSD. So it’s really great with veterans or just people that have had major trauma in their life. It’s a mode of counseling and therapy that’s been really effective. There have been a lot more research about EMDR, which you probably talked about on your show. So they provide that as a specialty, if you will. We have child therapy, we actually have a child therapy rooms, we have two therapists that specialize in children and people that children that are dealing with some really big issues, whether it be sexual abuse, or just some kind of abuse in their upbringing, or they’re, they’re having special learning disabilities, or there’s other issues are bumping into, and the parents not sure what to do. They come to our counselors, and they, they provide some child therapy. So that’s been a great offering. We have a couple of other counselors that specialize in addictions, substance abuse, specifically. And that’s been something they’ve certainly during COVID, sadly, that that’s been really on the uptick in terms of more people struggling with that as a way of self medicating through this crisis that we’re going through. So we’ve got some specialists with addiction issues, and I could go on. So we’ve got a lot of variety of things from marriage counseling, to chill children’s therapy, to specializations, and different modalities that really match wherever people are.

Jessica Crate
Well, fantastic. And I love that you do really a holistic approach of all different ages, all different areas. And there really is something for everyone. And we’ll make sure we get those links to ccpc and different specifics, here in our video blog. So those of you tuning in, please scroll down and click those links, and funnel right over to ccpc. And now that brings me to my next question. And you you have such a prominent role here in Park City. What do you think community connectedness, what role do you think community connectedness plays in our mental health? Not only during COVID. But how has that the pandemic affected people’s ability to connect? And what do you foresee during the holidays?

Rob Harter
Well, yeah, I think it’s so good that you probably talked about this in your show before, that we as a community, Summit County and Park City really wrapped her arms around this mental health challenge, if you will, in reducing the stigma around mental wellness and mental health. Previous to COVID. I think that was a really good thing. And the reason is going back to your question is having a connected community means that people know what the resources are. People can talk it up. So someone in a community setting or in a faith community, or they just bumped into each other at Starbucks, say, Hey, I’m dealing with whatever depression anxiety, Hey, have you talked to this organization if you talk to this council over here, so having this connectedness, I think has made the resources much more available, and people are aware of them, and people are actually going and taking advantage of these resources in a good way. So like, that’s been probably the best thing that happened before COVID. And it’s continued. As we go into the holidays, like you said, I think that’s going to be a challenge in the sense that we’ll depends on what we end up doing with COVID. You know, if we shut down more or whatever, but I think the good news is we’ve really transitioned we’re telehealth. We can do everything through telehealth, if we have to. Now our counselors right now, 80% of them are see people in person. And we wear masks. And we do we follow the health department guidelines of everything we need to do to keep everyone safe. But we do have in person counseling, but we also have telehealth. So I think the fact that we have those options, even during these holiday seasons, I think that’s going to be something that’s still available. And then the thing I think that’s been really important to pass on. And we’ve done this pretty much every year, there is a real such thing called holiday blues, right? Where people that are supposed to be pretty good Christmas, right? We’re supposed to be so happy during the holidays, everything’s supposed to be going great. Well, it already is COVID. So it’s not going great, right? And so their grief and depression or if you’ve had a loss during the holidays, that’s a really big need. And we have found that that’s something where our counselors are very much aware of that. And I just encourage people that are watching and listening to this, please be aware of that for themselves, but also to pass it on to their friends, that it’s not you don’t have to necessarily put a fake smile on go talk to somebody and process whatever is going on. Because it is in our culture this sense, well, you should be happy, you should be great. She’d be having a great time. Well, maybe not. And that is a very real thing called the holiday blues. And that’s something that we have a special emphasis on every time during this year when we go through the holidays.

Jessica Crate
I love that, you know, I love that you’re, you know, reaching people and meeting people where they’re at, you know, everybody’s experiencing something different. Everybody’s moods and you know, what, what they’re going through and who they’re associating with, and how that’s affecting their world is is different for each person. So we’re really grateful that you guys recognize that are aware of that, and addressing that now in our community. So So Rob, tell us what can you share with us about the mental health and emotional impacts of being in a chronic pandemic? And what recommendations do you have, you know, for people to cope in and and thrive?

Rob Harter
And I like how you said thrive when we get to thrive? It is because that is that you know, you don’t want to just have a reaction to these issues. But yeah, I would say on the first name, kind of the sobering side, we have definitely seen a higher amount of calls than ever since we’ve been around for the last you know, eight years for anxiety, drama. Sorry, I’m depression, anxiety, and suicide ideation. So those three because of all the drama and all the difficulties and the isolation, and the uncertainty, and maybe you’ve lost your job, and you’ve lost your ability to pay for, you know, your rent, or just the fact losing your job, that alone is hits your self esteem, all those things have really been a bad mix, where it’s really caused a lot of people to have more anxiety than normal, more depression than normal, when we’re socially isolated, that that, sadly, is already just a human for people that normally say their mental health is pretty strong and pretty solid. When you’re socially isolated. That makes it very difficult. And so we’ve seen more calls than ever and the most difficult has been the suicide ideation, we’ve seen more folks struggling with suicide, that maybe have never struggled with it before, or people that have been under the surface in their life, and maybe they’ve struggled with it. But now with it, you know, from a one, it’s gone to a 10. Now, in terms of intensity and urgency, and close calls with, you know, talking to Intermountain the local hospital here, the psychiatrists on staff there. We do have a aprn on staff, Lindsay Broadbent, Dr. Brockman actually is fantastic. She basically is it’s, um, highly trained nurse, but it’s, it’s almost a psychiatrist, like one step down, and in other words, she can manage people’s medication. So the great thing about that is, and you can pass this on as a resource is that people that say they lost their job, and therefore they don’t have insurance anymore to cover their medicine, and therefore, medicine, and they’ve got a pretty serious underlying mental health issue. That could be night or day, and they could change dramatically. And we’ve seen that where they’ve not been able to afford it anymore. So they’ve been able to reach out to Dr. Broadbent. And through our scholarship program, we’ve been able to get them into getting help, and getting back on medicine. And so that’s been so critical during this time, because that it’s interesting how, again, you’ve talked to him talk sure about that stigma, and trying to eliminate the stigma of getting help for your mental health issues. Right. I think that’s something I think for for the most part, we’re getting pretty successful, I think in this community where the stigma is going away more and more. But I think when it comes to people’s medication when they can’t afford it, or they don’t want to talk about it, and then they don’t get the help they need and then all of a sudden, they really becomes a, an urgent issue where they may find themselves in the ER. And so we just want to want to communicate to people, there is no shame in talking to somebody say, I’m not have been able to take my medicine because I can’t afford it. Come talk to one of our counselors, talk to Lindsay, she can help you through that we get we have scholarships can help even cover the cost of your medication. Because that going back to your last question about what does it look like to thrive? Yeah, you know, to have the medicine, you need to have the support, you need to have the counselor support, to have people in your life that know what’s going on, you’re honest enough to replace one or two people so they can really thrive. I think that’s really, really important right now, because we’re seeing such a high rate, again, of depression, anxiety and suicide ideation.

Jessica Crate
And thanks for bringing that piece up to and we’ll make sure that you guys have those links. And again, get with Lindsay, the counselors, and this is why this is so great. And we’re so grateful to have you on here today. Rob, you’ve been such an integral part of Communities That Care and within our community and just being able to rely on you guys as a resource and being able to send people to you and, and know that there are options. And so those of you tuning in, if you know of someone that needs this help to please let them know that there’s those resources out there as well. It’s fantastic. And, and really that brings me to the next question is, you know, action items. And so what can someone do today, right now? And what can they do to not only foster their well being, but some things to help them stay connected in, in our community as we continue to move forward in 2020, and move into 2021?

Rob Harter
Yeah, I think you know, on with some of the issues already mentioned, I think just knowing what the resources are. So listen to podcasts, like your own, going and clicking on the resources that you’re gonna send input with this posting. So really following through and doing your own research. And there’s so much out there. I mean, the one good thing about everything kind of going online, even though we’re kind of already we’re there. I think with COVID, it’s forced everyone to go online for information. There’s a lot of good things out there, there’s a lot of resources out there. So by going to your site can use the care coming to the Christian Center, coming to other places here in Park City. And in some account, you can find the resources. So first step, find out what the resources are. And then number two is yet develop your whatever you’ve done with like your friendships, I know it’s difficult. I mean, we kind of open back up when it was summertime, it was still warm, and you go outside. And now it’s a little bit more shut down right now with the governor’s new order through at least a Thanksgiving time. That’s difficult. So do whatever it takes to connect with people, whether it be through zoom call, phone call, even texting. I mean, I know a lot of my kids are dead texts, but that’s a communication form. And so they’re staying in contact with their friends through texting. Maybe you have Marco Polo or Facebook Live or something where you can use the technology that we have to stay connected. It was funny right before the show you’d mentioned like it’s been difficult, like we haven’t seen people face to face. And that is hard. I mean, that’s the way we’re wired right to be in person with people. Well, if we can’t do that, because of code restrictions, at least do it through a computer screen at least because it seen someone’s face. Especially talking to them at least their computer, it’s at least better than nothing. And so second action step would be social isolation. If you’ve not really talked to one of your close friends, or just your friends in general and a long time, it’s time, like, Don’t think, Oh, I can handle it, I can just be by myself for a while, I’ll just, you know, soldier on for another couple of weeks through the holidays, I would say no, that’s not a good strategy. Because sadly, when our counselors get these calls, when people have gotten to the limit, where they don’t have any more resources, they’ve kind of waited too long. And then they don’t feel like there’s any options, they don’t think anyone’s gonna care, or then they do reach out and maybe don’t get ahold of somebody right away, because it’s been a long time. And then all of a sudden, they feel totally by themselves completely alone, which reinforces this feeling like I really MLM. And therefore, then these thoughts of suicide can really just go to another level. So that’s why I’d say be proactive. Now, while you’re feeling pretty good, hopefully are your mental health, you know, issues are at a place where you can manage them with again, with counselor help, or with resource help. And just be practice with your friendships and your social connection. Because we’re social beings, right? We’re not meant to live by ourselves. And so really beef that up again, through whatever technology you can do, whatever resources that are out there, whatever you connect with the most and resonate with, I would just go for that and make that a priority.

Jessica Crate
I love that, you know, as humans, we’re wired to connect and be connected and stay connected. And so, you know, we are all about prevention. So I love that you said Be proactive.

Rob Harter
that’s right.

Jessica Crate
You know, if it sparks joy, do it. And if you need to spark joy, do something in your life that will spark join and help you stay connected. There’s so many portals and if you need some help, feel free to message either CTC or CCBC. Right keeps it simple. Now one of my favorite questions, and everyone knows this on the show, if you could wave your magic wand Rob, what would you like to see or create in our community?

Rob Harter
That’s a great question. I saw that. That’s a good question. Yeah, I think number one, I’m continuing just to eliminate all remnants of the stigma of getting help. And I think what we’ve bumped into, you know, we serve a wide range of people, you know, through our food pantry, and our, all the different programs, we work with the the Latin x community, we work with the Filipino community, of course, the Caucasian community, and just a broader Park City. We’re in Wasatch county as well. We work with Native American communities, indigenous communities throughout the state. So what we found is there, there’s still stigma out there, and I get I think we’re really doing a good job at some county overall. But it’s still we still have some work to do, where there’s, I think, particularly when it comes to depression, and the sense of, well, I can just handle this depression or anxiety on my own, I really don’t need anybody to walk me through. It’s almost like, you know, yeah, if you, you’re really feeling like, I’m losing it here, I need to go talk to somebody. But then there’s a step down, where you’re functioning normally, for the most part, you’re going into work and you’re doing, you’re interacting with people, but you know, you’re not really functioning at your best, and there may be this low line depression. And there’s just a sense, well, I don’t really need to go to somebody to talk about it, because I’m really not that off. Or I’m not that bad off, you know, with this issue. And because that tells me there’s still a little bit of stigma when wanting, not wanting to bring it up. And then the second piece of that would be a mate waving a magic one with when it comes to medication. There’s still I think, in some circles, there’s just a sense of medications really extreme like I really must be something must be really wrong with me if I need medication. And you know, the more you know, you’ve studied this, and with our counseling team, and even my own past history of just studying these things, there’s so many things that are physiological. And we really do need some medicine sometimes to deal with extreme depression, for example, yeah, we all get the blues and we all get some, you know, a little bit depression, say, but then there’s some of us for whatever reason, physiologically, we have some things where we have chemical imbalance in our you know, our physical makeup. Maybe it’s diet driven, maybe it’s the climate, maybe it’s a lack of oxygen being so high up in the altitude where we live. There’s been studies that shows people that live in higher altitude, such environments, for example, have greater rates of suicide ideation and suicides in general. Well, part of it they’ve mentioned is that the lack of oxygen and the altitude and other things, I mean, it’s just one little piece. So all that to say, I think, just can get rid of all the stigma. And that it’s nothing just like if you went to you had something wrong with your arm, or your your diets way off, and you have no problem going to a dietitian or nutritionist, the same thing. Why would we have any worry about going to a counselor or psychiatrist or a PRN? Just to really level the playing field where everyone is available and not feeling bad about doing that?

Jessica Crate
I love that, you know, fix the roof while the sun still shining. Right?

Rob Harter
yeah, exactly.

Jessica Crate
I’m passionate about health and wellness in the holistic side. But there is a place for medicine too. And you have to, you know, start where you’re comfortable. And those of you tuning in, start where you’re comfortable move to where you’re confident and just start working on those things that you can help to make your body function optimally because you know, you are made and designed for an ultimate purpose and to feel your best. And I think sometimes we forget that how good our bodies are designed to feel right and that can lead to different things. So thanks for highlighting that. Two more questions for you. One just because we love having you part of Communities That Care, you know, talk to us about how being part of CTC has helped you in your work.

Rob Harter
Yeah, I think the number one, just the resources, you know, CTC is great about calling different speakers, seminars, workshops that have been really helpful. Again, back kind of before COVID. Right when now but even still, to this day. We’re doing a lot of those things online, right, where there’s a seminars through zoom. So I think CTC has been great about finding good resources, whether it be written resources, website, resources, seminars, workshops. So that’s been wonderful. That’s something just the colleagues of connecting, collaborating on different things. I know we’ve done with Mary Krista, you know, we did provide a different parenting seminars, we’ve done some parent seminars on wellness. We’ve done some, you know, seminars, we’ve got somebody who follows Dr. Hyman, maybe you’ve talked to him before, and talked about his, you know, his approach to medicine, this functional medicine approach. Doctor was just

Jessica Crate
that was the last event I was at with you.

Rob Harter
Oh, yeah, that’s right. You were there. Exactly. Yeah. After the trip, he was there. That was like the last event. Yeah, you know, that’s exactly was it was a Friday before everything shut down. And it’s a good memory. So yeah, Nancy Angle is on our staff. And she’s a functional medicine practitioner, and she’s followed Dr. Hyman quite a bit. So you know, having those kind of seminars, and then working with the CDC to make sure there’s a lot of different options out there for people so that our whole community knows that it there are resources not just to get for mental health, but nutrition, health, and like you said, the holistic approach, trainings on how do we integrate all of those things so that we’re fully functioning, not just mentally, but physically and spiritually even, you know, so I think just having those resources, the collaboration that happens, and the support from each other, and making sure people can have those resources at their fingertips has been one of the best things.

Jessica Crate
Awesome, I love that, well, we’re so appreciative of you, you know, I always say this, it takes a village because it truly does. In our Park City, Hallmark town, it’s really great to have you as such an integral piece to, to what makes our community flourish and synergize and thrive together. And I’m excited because we’ve been working on some things just you know, myself included, just because we do live in a high altitude town and oxygen deprivation and your brain and your body is associated with a lot of the things like that are due to inflammation, stress and, and whatnot. So we’re putting together some resources, not only nutrition, but it is a comprehensive lifestyle, mind body, soul, emotional, physical, spiritual and, and holistic wellness. So as we enter ski season, we’re pumped, I hope to see you on the slopes. Yeah. Last thing before we let you go, you know, and I love asking people this because truly, you’re living and leaving a legacy Robin, not only yourself and your family, but in into your work. So to leave our viewers and our listeners with one thing, your legacy, your mantra, quote, what would it be?

Rob Harter
Oh, that’s a good question. I think, um, boy, I think self care is so important. I think the more you focus on, I kind of put it in the terms of like self leadership, but it’s really it’s about self care. And it’s something’s not original with me. But I remember, author that talked about leadership. And we often talk about leadership, people, leading people under you, or leading with people, like if you have a board, like I have a board that I report to, so you lead up, you lead down, you lead with your peers, you know, horizontally, but self care and what he calls it as 30 360 degrees of leadership, when you look inside and make sure you’re leading yourself well, which really comes down to self care. That, to me is one of the most important things because I found that, you know, as a Christian Center has grown tremendously. I mean, we’ve, you know, quadrupled our budget. And we’ve you know, more than that, with our staff, we’ve just really grown and we’re doing a lot of things, and it’s all wonderful and good. But if you’re not leading yourself, if you’re not doing self care, and taking care of the internal things of who you are as an individual, then you’re not very good. As a leader, you’re not very good at making decisions, you’re not going to be very good, you know, being on a podcast and sharing insights. So I think it’s sometimes counterintuitive, you know, particularly early on in my career, I thought, well, I just want to go go go and I have a lot of energy, I’m very much like you you’re you’re a go getter. Jessica, you got a lot of energy. And sometimes we just run ourselves into the wall, and we just collapse because we’re just going too hard. We’re not taking care of ourselves. So if there’s one thing I pass on is just the importance of self care. So whatever that looks like, if it’s working out every day, if it’s meditation, if it’s being part of a faith community, if it’s whatever it is doing those things that really fill you up, and make sure that you are doing good internally, and you’re leading yourself. Because if you’re leading yourself, well, you can lead other people much better. And so I think that’s probably my biggest thing. I continue to learn. I’m still not there. But I feel like I’m getting so much better. And I’m saying better, setting better boundaries, saying no more. And in order to say yes to the right things. And I think that’s all part of self leadership and self care.

Jessica Crate
Boom. I hope you guys all have a notebook and a pen because you’re dropping some great nuggets. Good. I truly agree, you know, and that’s the best thing about life is that you’re constantly learning and growing. And we’ve never arrived. I think that’s the beauty of it. You go, Oh, I hate hearing you’re like, Oh, I have so much more to learn, right, exactly exciting. And it’s important to feel your Tango is use that analogy, like, if you’re going to fill your car with gas, or if you’re having a car charge, it seems like you’re like on a rocket ship. So make sure you have a ton of fuel in that tank, but it’s really your tank first before you can pour that to others. And that’s so important. So well. We appreciate you so much for taking time out of your busy day and what you do to share your work and make sure those resources are here below. So again, thank you all for joining us for our mental health Mondays, a video podcast by Communities That Care Summit County. So on behalf of our executive director, Mary Christa and myself, Jessica crate, we thank you for tuning in and we look forward to seeing you on our next episodes. Again, you can find a link to all of our podcasts and our blog at CTC summit. county.org. So thanks again, Rob, and all have a wonderful week.

Rob Harter
You too. Thanks again. Appreciate it, Jessica. You got it. Take care.

“Utilizamos un servicio automatizado para esta traducción. Somos conscientes de que puede haber errores y agradecemos su comprensión”.

Jessica Crate  
De acuerdo a todos. Hola y bienvenido a nuestro video podcast de los lunes sobre salud mental de Communities That Care. Estamos muy emocionados de estar aquí hoy. Mi nombre es Jessica Crate. Soy la vocera visionaria de Communities That Care Summit County y CTC, Summit County, nuestra visión es verdaderamente un mundo de conexión y vitalidad donde los niños y las familias prosperan. Y nuestra misión es mejorar de manera colaborativa las vidas de los jóvenes y la familia fomentando una cultura de la juventud. Fomentar una cultura de la salud a través de la prevención. Así que dilo tres veces rápido. Sé que amo esta organización. Y estamos haciendo un gran trabajo aquí. Y realmente en una cultura de conexión y prevención. Estamos muy emocionados de tener a Rob Harter aquí. Rob es un profesional ejecutivo sin fines de lucro aquí en el condado de Summit, específicamente en Park City, tiene un espíritu tan emprendedor que verá una sonrisa brillando por toda nuestra costa aquí. Pero Rob se convirtió en director ejecutivo del Christian Center y también en ccpc. Y le contará un poco más sobre una organización humanitaria sin fines de lucro centrada en la comunidad, con una visión audaz de servir como un líder en redes de servicios comunitarios con sede en Park City. Y desde entonces, ya sabes, durante más de una década, Rob, has hecho un trabajo increíble. Y usted continúa fomentando una comunidad tan increíble de conexión y eventos y cosas en todo Park City. Rob, gracias por estar aquí hoy. Cuéntanos un poco más sobre ti. Y tu organización. Y realmente la iniciativa es que ustedes tienen la lucha detrás de eso. Sé que te encanta Park City. Así que infórmanos.

Rob Harter  
Absolutamente. Bien gracias. Genial estar en el programa. Gracias por invitarme a estar en el programa. Sí, estoy muy emocionado de poder hablar en cualquier momento sobre salud mental y por qué Park City es una comunidad maravillosa y Communities That Care proporciona un gran catalizador para ayudarnos a todos a trabajar juntos. Sí, he estado aquí durante 10 años, es difícil de creer, incluso desde hace 10 años, nos mudamos de Colorado, el área de Boulder, Colorado, pero nos mudamos aquí para el puesto de director ejecutivo de ccpc, o Christian Central Park City. Así que eso es lo que nos trajo aquí en primer lugar. Y ha sido fantástico. Como me encanta Está permitida esta organización. Cuando llegué por primera vez, teníamos alrededor de nueve empleados remunerados. Y realmente hemos pasado por una gran transformación de crecimiento en la que ahora tenemos 53 empleados remunerados, pasamos por una importante campaña de capital sobre $ 9.3 millones de campaña de capital. Así que nuestro edificio se expandió bastante, Park City. Y también tenemos un campus en hebreo. Y luego tenemos programas que se extienden por todo el estado, principalmente en este momento con las comunidades nativas americanas, la comunidad go shoot, en el lado occidental de Utah, y luego en el área de las cuatro esquinas, con la Navajo Nation. Y luego hacemos muchas cosas diferentes en todo el estado colaborando con otras organizaciones sin fines de lucro. Así que realmente nos hemos convertido en una organización estatal. Ha sido muy divertido verlo y crecer. Y ciertamente ha habido muchos dolores de crecimiento en el camino. Pero ha sido realmente emocionante. Y creo que lo que ha sido realmente interesante, Jessica, es que, creo que justo antes de que llegara COVID, habíamos terminado con una campaña de capital, lo que ayudó, habíamos crecido hasta cierto nivel en el que cuando llegó COVID porque somos un centro comunitario humanitario, que tenemos dos despensas de alimentos, proporcionamos una asistencia de necesidades básicas, que ayuda con la asistencia para el alquiler, o facturas inesperadas, facturas médicas, reparaciones de automóviles, cosas así, cuando esas cosas suceden y, por supuesto, nuestros problemas de salud mental que aparecieron durante COVID. Estábamos preparados y listos para partir. Ahora teníamos que ampliar nuestra organización para satisfacer la demanda abrumadora de alimentos, asistencia para el alquiler y salud mental. Pero podemos hacer eso y una instantánea sería sobre COVID, pudimos dar casi un millón de dólares en asistencia para el alquiler, como un ejemplo. Y luego, por supuesto, hemos servido comida a miles de personas. Y luego hemos servido a cientos de personas con nuestro asesoramiento sobre salud mental y sé que lo abordaremos en un momento. Pero ha sido divertido. Como tenemos un gran equipo, tenemos una gran comunidad que nos apoya, que realmente nos hace posible brindar todos estos servicios, ellos nos apoyan económicamente, y a través del trabajo voluntario. Así que me siento muy afortunado de vivir en una comunidad como Park City, donde recibimos un apoyo tan maravilloso de esta comunidad.

Jessica Crate  
Bueno, somos muy afortunados y bendecidos de tenerlos como parte de nuestra comunidad y, ya saben, realmente se necesita un pueblo. Y entonces tenerte es una parte tan integral de lo que estamos haciendo como comunidad y solo verte servir y, ya sabes, ayudar a las personas a prosperar durante esto, especialmente durante esta pandemia, es clave. E incluso fuera de eso, ustedes hacen mucho trabajo. Así que centrémonos más en centrarnos realmente en ese aspecto de la salud mental. Entonces, ¿cómo están y en qué se están enfocando para fomentar la salud mental y la integridad en nuestra comunidad? ¿Cuáles son algunas de las cosas específicas que están haciendo?

Rob Harter  
Sí, gran pregunta. Así que también hacemos un poco de historia. Así que comenzamos oficialmente, nuestro centro de consejería de salud mental que era parte integral del Christian Center, al igual que nuestra despensa de alimentos no es como si tuviéramos tres tiendas de segunda mano. Decidimos que hace ocho años que íbamos a tener nuestra propia consejería de salud mental que salió del centro humanitario que era el Christian Center. Entonces, mi esposa Leah, en realidad es la directora y comenzó como directora y comenzamos con esa persona, y luego lo hemos vuelto a crecer, y ahora tenemos 15 empleados que forman parte de nuestros centros de asesoramiento de salud mental. Por eso proporcionamos una amplia variedad de recursos. Entonces, un par de ejemplos para tu pregunta. Así que tenemos dos personas en el personal, mi esposa es una de ellas que se especializa en EMDR. Esa es una especialización para aquellos que han pasado por un trauma o aquellos que han pasado por TEPT. Así que es realmente genial con los veteranos o simplemente con las personas que han tenido un trauma importante en su vida. Es un modo de asesoramiento y terapia que ha sido realmente eficaz. Ha habido mucha más investigación sobre EMDR, de la que probablemente hablaste en tu programa. Así que lo ofrecen como especialidad, por así decirlo. Tenemos terapia infantil, en realidad tenemos salas de terapia infantil, tenemos dos terapeutas que se especializan en niños y personas que los niños están lidiando con algunos problemas realmente importantes, ya sea abuso sexual o simplemente algún tipo de abuso en su educación. o tienen discapacidades especiales de aprendizaje, o hay otros problemas con los que se topan y los padres no están seguros de qué hacer. Acuden a nuestros consejeros y ellos brindan terapia infantil. Así que ha sido una gran oferta. Tenemos un par de otros consejeros que se especializan en adicciones, abuso de sustancias, específicamente. Y eso ha sido algo que sin duda han tenido durante COVID, lamentablemente, que ha ido en aumento en términos de más personas que luchan con eso como una forma de automedicarse a través de esta crisis por la que estamos atravesando. Tenemos algunos especialistas con problemas de adicción y podría continuar. Así que tenemos una gran variedad de cosas, desde consejería matrimonial, terapia de relajación para niños, especializaciones y diferentes modalidades que realmente se adaptan a cualquier lugar donde se encuentre la gente.

Jessica Crate
Bueno, fantástico. Y me encanta que realices un enfoque holístico de todas las edades y áreas diferentes. Y realmente hay algo para todos. Y nos aseguraremos de obtener esos enlaces a ccpc y diferentes detalles, aquí en nuestro video blog. Entonces, aquellos de ustedes que estén sintonizados, desplácese hacia abajo y haga clic en esos enlaces, y canalice directamente a ccpc. Y ahora eso me lleva a mi siguiente pregunta. Y tienes un papel tan destacado aquí en Park City. ¿Qué crees que la conexión comunitaria, qué papel crees que juega la conexión comunitaria en nuestra salud mental? No solo durante COVID. Pero, ¿cómo ha afectado la pandemia la capacidad de las personas para conectarse? ¿Y qué prevé durante las vacaciones?

Rob Harter  
Bueno, sí, creo que es tan bueno que probablemente hayas hablado de esto en tu programa antes, que nosotros, como comunidad, el condado de Summit y Park City realmente abrazamos este desafío de salud mental, por así decirlo, para reducir el estigma alrededor. bienestar mental y salud mental. Anterior a COVID. Creo que fue algo realmente bueno. Y la razón para volver a tu pregunta es que tener una comunidad conectada significa que la gente sabe cuáles son los recursos. La gente puede hablarlo. Entonces, alguien en un entorno comunitario o en una comunidad de fe, o simplemente se encontraron en Starbucks, diga: Oye, estoy lidiando con cualquier depresión, ansiedad, Oye, ¿has hablado con esta organización si hablas con este consejo sobre aquí, tener esta conexión, creo que ha hecho que los recursos estén mucho más disponibles, y la gente los conoce, y la gente realmente está aprovechando estos recursos de una buena manera. Entonces, eso fue probablemente lo mejor que sucedió antes de COVID. Y continúa. A medida que nos acercamos a las vacaciones, como dijiste, creo que será un desafío en el sentido de que dependeremos de lo que terminemos haciendo con COVID. Ya sabes, si cerramos más o lo que sea, pero creo que la buena noticia es que realmente hemos hecho la transición a telesalud. Podemos hacer todo a través de telesalud, si es necesario. Ahora nuestros consejeros en este momento, el 80% de ellos ven a personas en persona. Y usamos máscaras. Y seguimos las pautas del departamento de salud de todo lo que debemos hacer para mantener a todos a salvo. Pero tenemos asesoramiento en persona, pero también tenemos telesalud. Así que creo que el hecho de que tengamos esas opciones, incluso durante estas temporadas de vacaciones, será algo que todavía estará disponible.Y luego lo que creo que ha sido realmente importante transmitir. Y hemos hecho esto casi todos los años, hay algo así llamado blues navideño, ¿verdad? Donde la gente que se supone que es muy buena Navidad, ¿verdad? Se supone que debemos ser tan felices durante las vacaciones, que se supone que todo va muy bien. Bueno, ya es COVID. Entonces no va muy bien, ¿verdad? Y entonces su dolor y depresión o si ha tenido una pérdida durante las vacaciones, esa es una gran necesidad. Y hemos descubierto que eso es algo en lo que nuestros consejeros son muy conscientes de ello. Y solo animo a las personas que están viendo y escuchando esto, por favor, sean conscientes de eso por sí mismos, pero también para que se lo transmitan a sus amigos, que no es que no necesariamente tienes que poner una sonrisa falsa en ir a hablar con alguien. y procesar lo que sea que esté sucediendo. Porque es en nuestra cultura este sentido, bueno, debes ser feliz, debes ser grandioso. Ella se lo estaría pasando genial. Bueno, tal vez no. Y eso es algo muy real llamado tristeza navideña. Y eso es algo en lo que tenemos un énfasis especial cada vez durante este año cuando pasamos por las vacaciones.

Jessica Crate  
Me encanta eso, ya sabes, me encanta que estés, ya sabes, llegando a la gente y conociendo gente donde están, ya sabes, todo el mundo está experimentando algo diferente. Los estados de ánimo de todos y tú sabes, qué, por qué están pasando y con quién se están asociando, y cómo eso está afectando su mundo es diferente para cada persona. Así que estamos realmente agradecidos de que ustedes reconozcan que son conscientes de eso y lo están abordando ahora en nuestra comunidad. Entonces, Rob, cuéntanos qué puedes compartir con nosotros sobre la salud mental y los impactos emocionales de estar en una pandemia crónica. ¿Y qué recomendaciones tiene, ya sabe, para que las personas se enfrenten y prosperen?

Rob Harter  
¿Y me gusta cómo dijiste prosperar cuando llegamos a prosperar? Es porque eso es lo que sabes, no solo quieres tener una reacción a estos problemas. Pero sí, diría que en el primer nombre, un poco aleccionador, definitivamente hemos visto una mayor cantidad de llamadas que nunca desde que hemos estado aquí por última vez, ocho años por ansiedad, drama. Lo siento, soy depresión, ansiedad e ideación suicida. Entonces esos tres por todo el drama y todas las dificultades y el aislamiento y la incertidumbre, y tal vez hayas perdido tu trabajo, y hayas perdido tu capacidad de pagar, ya sabes, tu alquiler, o simplemente el hecho perder tu trabajo, eso solo afecta tu autoestima, todas esas cosas realmente han sido una mala combinación, donde realmente ha causado que mucha gente tenga más ansiedad de lo normal, más depresión de lo normal, cuando estamos socialmente aislados, eso que, lamentablemente, ya es un ser humano para las personas que normalmente dicen que su salud mental es bastante fuerte y sólida. Cuando estás socialmente aislado. Eso lo hace muy difícil. Y entonces hemos visto más llamadas que nunca y la más difícil ha sido la ideación suicida, hemos visto a más personas luchando contra el suicidio, que tal vez nunca lo han luchado antes, o personas que han estado bajo la superficie en su vida. , y tal vez hayan luchado con eso. Pero ahora con eso, ya sabes, de uno, ha pasado a 10. Ahora, en términos de intensidad y urgencia, y llamadas cercanas con, ya sabes, hablando con Intermountain, el hospital local aquí, los psiquiatras del personal allí. Tenemos un aprn en el personal, Lindsay Broadbent, el Dr. Brockman en realidad es fantástico. Básicamente es, eh, una enfermera altamente capacitada, pero es casi una psiquiatra, como un escalón hacia abajo, y en otras palabras, puede administrar la medicación de las personas. Entonces, lo mejor de eso es que, y puede transmitir esto como un recurso, es que las personas que dicen que perdieron su trabajo y, por lo tanto, ya no tienen seguro para cubrir sus medicamentos y, por lo tanto, los medicamentos. tiene un problema de salud mental subyacente bastante grave. Eso podría ser de día o de noche, y podrían cambiar drásticamente. Y hemos visto que ya no han podido pagarlo. Así que han podido comunicarse con el Dr. Broadbent. Y a través de nuestro programa de becas, hemos logrado que obtengan ayuda y vuelvan a tomar medicamentos. Y eso ha sido tan crítico durante este tiempo, porque es interesante cómo, nuevamente, hablaste con él, hablaste con certeza sobre ese estigma y trataste de eliminar el estigma de buscar ayuda para tus problemas de salud mental. Derecha. Creo que eso es algo en lo que pienso en su mayor parte, estamos teniendo bastante éxito, creo que en esta comunidad donde el estigma está desapareciendo cada vez más. Pero creo que cuando se trata de medicamentos para las personas cuando no pueden pagarlos, o no quieren hablar de ello, y luego no obtienen la ayuda que necesitan y luego, de repente, se vuelven realmente un problema. , un problema urgente en el que pueden encontrarse en la sala de emergencias. Así que solo queremos comunicarnos con la gente, no hay vergüenza en hablar con alguien que diga, no he podido tomar mi medicamento porque no puedo pagarlo. Venga a hablar con uno de nuestros consejeros, hable con Lindsay, ella puede ayudarlo a lograr que tengamos becas que pueden ayudar incluso a cubrir el costo de su medicamento. Porque eso se remonta a su última pregunta sobre cómo se ve prosperar. Sí, ya sabes, para tener la medicina, necesitas tener el apoyo, necesitas el apoyo de un consejero, tener personas en tu vida que sepan lo que está pasando, eres lo suficientemente honesto para reemplazar a una o dos personas para que realmente puede prosperar. Creo que eso es muy, muy importante en este momento, porque estamos viendo una tasa tan alta, nuevamente, de depresión, ansiedad e ideación suicida.

Jessica Crate  
Y gracias por traer esa pieza y nos aseguraremos de que ustedes tengan esos enlaces. Y nuevamente, póngase con Lindsay, los consejeros, y es por eso que esto es tan bueno. Y estamos muy agradecidos de tenerte aquí hoy. Rob, has sido una parte tan integral de Communities That Care y dentro de nuestra comunidad y solo has podido confiar en ustedes como un recurso y poder enviarles personas y saber que hay opciones. Entonces, aquellos de ustedes que estén sintonizados, si conocen a alguien que necesite esta ayuda, háganle saber que también existen esos recursos. Es fantástico. Y, y realmente eso me lleva a la siguiente pregunta, ya sabes, elementos de acción. Entonces, ¿qué puede hacer alguien hoy, ahora mismo? ¿Y qué pueden hacer no solo para fomentar su bienestar, sino también algunas cosas para ayudarlos a mantenerse conectados en nuestra comunidad a medida que continuamos avanzando en 2020 y entrando en 2021?

Rob Harter  
Sí, creo que ya sabes, sobre algunos de los problemas ya mencionados, creo que solo sabiendo cuáles son los recursos. Así que escuche podcasts, como el suyo, yendo y haciendo clic en los recursos que enviará con esta publicación. Realmente siguiendo y haciendo su propia investigación. Y hay mucho por ahí. Quiero decir, lo único bueno de todo tipo de conexión en línea, aunque ya estamos allí. Creo que COVID obliga a todos a buscar información en línea. Hay muchas cosas buenas ahí fuera, hay muchos recursos ahí fuera. Entonces, yendo a su sitio, puede usar la atención que viene al Christian Center, al venir a otros lugares aquí en Park City. Y en alguna cuenta, puedes encontrar los recursos. Entonces, primer paso, averigüe cuáles son los recursos. Y luego, el número dos es desarrollar lo que sea que hayas hecho con tus amistades, sé que es difícil. Quiero decir, abrimos de nuevo cuando era verano, todavía hacía calor, y sales. Y ahora está un poco más cerrado ahora mismo con la nueva orden del gobernador hasta al menos el tiempo de Acción de Gracias. Eso es difícil. Así que haga lo que sea necesario para conectarse con la gente, ya sea a través de llamadas de zoom, llamadas telefónicas, incluso mensajes de texto. Quiero decir, sé que muchos de mis hijos son mensajes de texto muertos, pero esa es una forma de comunicación. Y así se mantienen en contacto con sus amigos a través de mensajes de texto. Tal vez tenga Marco Polo o Facebook Live o algo donde pueda usar la tecnología que tenemos para mantenerse conectados. Fue divertido justo antes del programa que mencionaste, como si hubiera sido difícil, como si no hubiéramos visto a la gente cara a cara. Y eso es duro. Quiero decir, esa es la forma en que estamos conectados correctamente para estar en persona con la gente. Bueno, si no podemos hacer eso, debido a restricciones de código, al menos hacerlo a través de la pantalla de una computadora, al menos porque vio la cara de alguien. Especialmente hablando con ellos al menos su computadora, es al menos mejor que nada. Entonces, el segundo paso de acción sería el aislamiento social. Si realmente no has hablado con uno de tus amigos cercanos, o solo con tus amigos en general y durante mucho tiempo, es el momento, como, No pienses, Oh, puedo manejarlo, puedo estar solo por un tiempo. mientras, ya sabes, continuaré un par de semanas más durante las vacaciones, diría que no, que no es una buena estrategia. Porque, lamentablemente, cuando nuestros consejeros reciben estas llamadas, cuando las personas han llegado al límite, donde no tienen más recursos, han esperado demasiado. Y luego sienten que no hay opciones, no creen que a nadie le importe, o luego se acercan y tal vez no se comunican con alguien de inmediato, porque ha pasado mucho tiempo. Y luego, de repente, se sienten totalmente solos, completamente solos, lo que refuerza este sentimiento de que realmente soy MLM. Y por lo tanto, estos pensamientos suicidas realmente pueden ir a otro nivel. Por eso diría que sea proactivo. Ahora, mientras te sientes bastante bien, es de esperar que tu salud mental esté, ya sabes, los problemas están en un lugar donde puedes manejarlos nuevamente, con la ayuda de un consejero o con ayuda de recursos. Y solo practica con tus amistades y tu conexión social. Porque somos seres sociales, ¿verdad? No estamos destinados a vivir solos. Y entonces refuerce eso de nuevo, a través de cualquier tecnología que pueda hacer, cualquier recurso que esté ahí fuera, con lo que más se conecte y resuene, simplemente iría por eso y lo convertiría en una prioridad.

Jessica Crate  
Me encanta que, como seres humanos, estemos programados para conectarnos y estar conectados y permanecer conectados. Y entonces, ya sabes, nos preocupamos por la prevención. Así que me encanta que hayas dicho Sé proactivo.

Rob Harter  
Así es.

Jessica Crate  
Ya sabes, si te provoca alegría, hazlo. Y si necesita despertar alegría, haga algo en su vida que lo ayude a unirse y mantenerse conectado. Hay tantos portales y si necesita ayuda, no dude en enviar un mensaje a CTC o CCBC. Right lo mantiene simple. Ahora, una de mis preguntas favoritas, y todo el mundo lo sabe en el programa, si pudieras agitar tu varita mágica Rob, ¿qué te gustaría ver o crear en nuestra comunidad?

Rob Harter  
Esa es una gran pregunta. Vi eso. Buena pregunta. Sí, creo que número uno, continúo solo para eliminar todos los restos del estigma de obtener ayuda. Y creo que con lo que nos hemos topado, ya sabes, servimos a una amplia gama de personas, ya sabes, a través de nuestra despensa de alimentos, y nuestros, todos los diferentes programas, trabajamos con la comunidad Latin x, trabajamos con la La comunidad filipina, por supuesto, la comunidad caucásica y solo un Park City más amplio. También estamos en el condado de Wasatch. Trabajamos con comunidades nativas americanas, comunidades indígenas en todo el estado. Entonces, lo que encontramos es que todavía hay estigma, y ​​creo que realmente estamos haciendo un buen trabajo en algún condado en general. Pero todavía tenemos trabajo por hacer, donde creo que hay, particularmente cuando se trata de depresión, y la sensación de, bueno, puedo manejar esta depresión o ansiedad por mi cuenta, realmente no necesito a nadie. para guiarme. Es casi como, ya sabes, sí, si realmente te sientes como que lo estoy perdiendo aquí, necesito ir a hablar con alguien. Pero luego hay un paso hacia abajo, donde estás funcionando normalmente, en su mayor parte, vas a trabajar y lo estás haciendo, estás interactuando con la gente, pero sabes, realmente no estás funcionando en tu mejor, y puede haber esta depresión de línea baja. Y hay una sensación, bueno, realmente no necesito ir con alguien para hablar de eso, porque realmente no estoy tan mal. O no estoy tan mal, ya sabes, con este problema. Y porque eso me dice que todavía hay un poco de estigma al querer, no querer sacarlo a colación. Y luego, la segunda parte de eso sería un compañero agitando uno mágico cuando se trata de medicamentos. Todavía creo que, en algunos círculos, hay una sensación de medicamentos realmente extrema como si realmente tuviera que haber algo realmente mal en mí si necesito medicamentos. Y sabes, cuanto más sabes, has estudiado esto, y con nuestro equipo de consejería, e incluso mi propia historia pasada de simplemente estudiar estas cosas, hay muchas cosas que son fisiológicas. Y realmente necesitamos algunas medicinas a veces para lidiar con la depresión extrema, por ejemplo, sí, todos nos deprimimos y todos tenemos algo, ya sabes, un poco de depresión, digamos, pero luego algunos de nosotros por la razón que sea, fisiológicamente, tenemos algunas cosas en las que tenemos un desequilibrio químico en nuestra estructura física. Tal vez sea impulsado por la dieta, tal vez sea el clima, tal vez sea la falta de oxígeno por estar tan alto en la altitud donde vivimos. Ha habido estudios que muestran que las personas que viven a mayor altitud, tales entornos, por ejemplo, tienen mayores tasas de ideación suicida y suicidios en general. Bueno, parte de eso que han mencionado es que la falta de oxígeno y la altitud y otras cosas, quiero decir, es solo una pequeña parte. Así que todo eso para decir, creo, puede deshacerse de todo el estigma. Y que no es nada como si fueras a que tuvieras algo mal en tu brazo, o tu dieta fuera muy mala, y no tienes ningún problema en ir a un dietista o nutricionista, lo mismo. ¿Por qué tendríamos que preocuparnos por ir a un consejero o psiquiatra o un PRN? ¿Solo para nivelar realmente el campo de juego donde todos estén disponibles y no se sientan mal por hacer eso?

Jessica Crate  
Me encanta, ya sabes, arreglar el techo mientras aún brilla el sol. ¿Derecho?

Rob Harter  
si, exacto.

Jessica Crate  
Me apasiona la salud y el bienestar en el lado holístico. Pero también hay lugar para la medicina. Y tienes que empezar donde te sientas cómodo. Y aquellos de ustedes que sintonizan, comiencen donde se sientan cómodos, muévanse a donde estén seguros y simplemente comiencen a trabajar en aquellas cosas que pueden ayudar a que su cuerpo funcione de manera óptima porque saben que están hechos y diseñados para un propósito final. y sentirte lo mejor posible. Y creo que a veces nos olvidamos de lo bien que están diseñados nuestros cuerpos para sentirse bien y eso puede llevar a cosas diferentes. Así que gracias por resaltar eso. Dos preguntas más para ti. Uno solo porque nos encanta que formes parte de Communities That Care, ya sabes, cuéntanos cómo te ha ayudado ser parte de CTC en tu trabajo.

Rob Harter  
Sí, creo que el número uno, solo los recursos, ya sabes, CTC es genial para llamar a diferentes oradores, seminarios y talleres que han sido realmente útiles. Una vez más, antes de COVID. Justo cuando ahora, pero aún así, hasta el día de hoy. Estamos haciendo muchas de esas cosas en línea, ¿verdad ?, donde hay seminarios a través del zoom. Así que creo que CTC ha sido excelente para encontrar buenos recursos, ya sean recursos escritos, sitios web, recursos, seminarios, talleres. Así que ha sido maravilloso. Eso es algo que solo los colegas de conectar, colaborar en diferentes cosas. Sé que hemos terminado con Mary Christa, ya sabes, proporcionamos seminarios para padres diferentes, hemos realizado algunos seminarios para padres sobre el bienestar. Hemos hecho algunos, ya sabes, seminarios, tenemos a alguien que sigue al Dr. Hyman, quizás hayas hablado con él antes y hablaste sobre su, ya sabes, su enfoque de la medicina, este enfoque de la medicina funcional. El doctor era solo

Jessica Crate
ese fue el último evento en el que estuve contigo.

Rob Harter  
Oh, sí, eso es correcto. Tú estabas ahí. Exactamente. Si. Después del viaje, estuvo allí. Ese fue como el último evento. Sí, ya sabes, eso fue exactamente un viernes antes de que todo se apagara. Y es un buen recuerdo. Así que sí, Nancy Angle está en nuestro personal. Y es practicante de medicina funcional y ha seguido bastante al Dr. Hyman. Entonces, ya sabe, tener ese tipo de seminarios y luego trabajar con los CDC para asegurarse de que haya muchas opciones diferentes para las personas, de modo que toda nuestra comunidad sepa que hay recursos no solo para la salud mental, sino también para la nutrición. , salud, y como dijiste, el enfoque holístico, capacitaciones sobre cómo integramos todas esas cosas para que estemos funcionando completamente, no solo mentalmente, sino física e incluso espiritualmente, ya sabes, así que creo que solo tener esos recursos , la colaboración que se produce y el apoyo mutuo, y asegurarse de que las personas puedan tener esos recursos al alcance de la mano ha sido una de las mejores cosas.

Jessica Crate  
Impresionante, me encanta eso, bueno, te estamos muy agradecidos, ya sabes, siempre digo esto, se necesita una aldea porque realmente lo hace. En nuestra ciudad de Park City, ciudad de Hallmark, es realmente genial tenerte como una pieza integral de lo que hace que nuestra comunidad florezca, tenga sinergia y prospere juntos. Y estoy emocionado porque hemos estado trabajando en algunas cosas que tú sabes, incluido yo mismo, solo porque vivimos en una ciudad a gran altitud y con falta de oxígeno y tu cerebro y tu cuerpo están asociados con muchas cosas como esa. se deben a la inflamación, el estrés y otras cosas. Por lo tanto, estamos reuniendo algunos recursos, no solo nutrición, sino que es un estilo de vida integral, cuerpo, mente, alma, bienestar emocional, físico, espiritual y holístico. Así que cuando entramos en la temporada de esquí, estamos emocionados, espero verte en las pistas. Si. Lo último antes de que te dejemos ir, ya sabes, y me encanta preguntarle esto a la gente porque realmente estás viviendo y dejando un legado Robin, no solo tú y tu familia, sino también en tu trabajo. Entonces, para dejar a nuestros espectadores y oyentes con una cosa, su legado, su mantra, cita, ¿cuál sería?

Rob Harter  
Oh, esa es una buena pregunta. Creo, um, chico, creo que el cuidado personal es muy importante. Creo que cuanto más te enfocas, lo pongo en términos de auto liderazgo, pero en realidad se trata de autocuidado. Y es algo que no es original para mí. Pero recuerdo, autor que habló de liderazgo. Y a menudo hablamos de liderazgo, personas, liderar a las personas que están debajo de ti o liderar con las personas, como si tuvieras una junta, como si tuviera una junta a la que reporto, entonces lideras, lideras hacia abajo, lideras con tus compañeros , ya sabes, horizontalmente, pero el cuidado personal y lo que él llama 30 360 grados de liderazgo, cuando miras hacia adentro y te aseguras de estar liderando bien, lo que realmente se reduce al cuidado personal. Eso, para mí, es una de las cosas más importantes porque descubrí que, ya sabes, como Centro cristiano ha crecido enormemente. Quiero decir, ya sabes, cuadruplicamos nuestro presupuesto. Y sabemos, más que eso, con nuestro personal, realmente hemos crecido y estamos haciendo muchas cosas, y todo es maravilloso y bueno. Pero si no te estás dirigiendo a ti mismo, si no te estás cuidando y cuidando las cosas internas de quién eres como individuo, entonces no eres muy bueno. Como líder, no eres muy bueno para tomar decisiones, no vas a ser muy bueno, ya sabes, estando en un podcast y compartiendo ideas. Entonces creo que a veces es contradictorio, ya sabes, particularmente al principio de mi carrera, pensé, bueno, solo quiero ir, ir, ir y tengo mucha energía, me parezco mucho a ti. un go getter. Jessica, tienes mucha energía. Y a veces simplemente nos chocamos contra la pared y colapsamos porque estamos yendo demasiado duro. No nos estamos cuidando. Entonces, si hay algo que transmito es la importancia del cuidado personal. Entonces, sea lo que sea que se vea, si está funcionando todos los días, si es meditación, si es parte de una comunidad de fe, si es lo que sea que esté haciendo, esas cosas que realmente te llenan, y asegúrate de que lo estás haciendo bien internamente, y te estás guiando a ti mismo. Porque si te estás liderando a ti mismo, bueno, puedes liderar a otras personas mucho mejor. Y creo que eso es probablemente lo más importante. Sigo aprendiendo. Todavía no estoy ahí. Pero siento que estoy mejorando mucho. Y digo mejor, estableciendo mejores límites, sin decir nada más. Y para decir sí a las cosas correctas. Y creo que todo eso es parte del auto liderazgo y el autocuidado.

Jessica Crate  
Auge. Espero que todos tengan un cuaderno y un bolígrafo porque están dejando caer algunas pepitas geniales. Bueno. Realmente estoy de acuerdo, ya sabes, y eso es lo mejor de la vida es que estás aprendiendo y creciendo constantemente. Y nunca llegamos. Creo que esa es la belleza de eso. Tú dices, Oh, odio escuchar que estás como, Oh, tengo mucho más que aprender, cierto, exactamente emocionante. Y es importante sentir que su Tango usa esa analogía, por ejemplo, si va a llenar su auto con gasolina, o si va a cargar un auto, parece que está en un cohete. Así que asegúrese de tener una tonelada de combustible en ese tanque, pero en realidad es su tanque primero antes de poder verter eso en otros. Y eso es tan importante. Muy bien. Le agradecemos mucho por tomarse el tiempo de su ajetreado día y lo que hace para compartir su trabajo y asegurarse de que esos recursos estén aquí abajo. Nuevamente, gracias a todos por acompañarnos en nuestros lunes de salud mental, un video podcast de Communities That Care Summit County. Así que en nombre de nuestra directora ejecutiva, Mary Christa y de mí, Jessica Crate, les agradecemos por sintonizarnos y esperamos verlos en nuestros próximos episodios. Nuevamente, puede encontrar un enlace a todos nuestros podcasts y nuestro blog en la cumbre de CTC. county.org. Así que gracias de nuevo, Rob, y que tengan una semana maravillosa.

Rob Harter  
Igualmente. Gracias de nuevo. Te lo agradezco, Jessica. Lo tienes. Cuídate.

Join Us At An Event

  1. Mindful Relaxation

    November 17, 2020 @ 6:00 pm - January 5, 2021 @ 8:00 pm
  2. Your Guide to Healthy Holiday Boundaries

    December 3 @ 6:30 pm - 8:00 pm