Mental Health Mondays with Arch Wright; Behavioral Healthcare Provider in Private Practice at Arch Wright, Psychotherapist – Interventionist – Recovery Coach

Feb 10, 2021 | CTC Blog, Health and Wellness, Mental Health Mondays, Mental Wellness

Arch Wright is a psychotherapist in Summit County, focusing on family systems, addiction and recovery.   

My path to becoming a behavioral healthcare professional has been atypical. I am a University of Michigan Ross School of Business graduate, former corporate finance executive and internationally ranked professional ski racer. Today, having found my true calling, I hold a Master’s in Mental Health Counseling and am a Licensed Psychotherapist, Interventionist and Recovery Coach.

My personal and professional journey with the processes of family system dysfunction, addiction, relationships, therapy and recovery has given me significant insight into the causes and conditions that underlie virtually all forms of separation from our authentic selves. Regardless of the presenting issue(s), the solution is likely quite simple though not at all very obvious to even the keenest or determined mind. Grounded in knowledge and experience, I am able to partner in releasing blockages that have kept my clients from attaining peaceful lives of vibrant connection and sustainable abundance. I feel both honored and privileged to help a person rediscover, or perhaps discover for the first time, his or her true and vibrant self.

The work necessary for healing and expansion is rarely easy. A good fit and a high level of trust between a skilled professional and a motivated client are essential. As humans we are physiologically and psychologically designed to resist the truth. Tools that once helped us survive can hinder us from attaining the lives we deserve – lives with true intimacy, balance, and independence.

From this discussion:

You can learn more about Arch Wright and his work here.
https://www.archibaldwright.com

Jessica Crate  
All right. Good morning everyone and welcome to Mental Health Mondays with Communities That Care or video podcast and at CTC Summit County our vision is a world of connection, and vitality and well being where kids and families thrive. So our mission is collaboratively to improve the lives of youth and families by fostering a culture of health through prevention. And so connection truly is prevention. And so today, I’m excited to introduce our dear friend over here Arch Wright, Arch is a University of Michigan Ross School of Business graduate. He is a former corporate finance executive and former US alpine ski team member, rock star. So today he holds a master’s in mental health counseling and is a licensed psychotherapist and interventionist art resided in Park City in the late 70s. And early 80s, during his ski racing days, and moved away until 2012, when he returned to settle in as a permanent resident Arch, his private practice here today is located in Kimball junction, and he and his spouse operate an intervention company in the national marketplace. He is married and the father of two adult children. And so today, we are so excited to dive in with you arch and learn a little bit more about you. So tell us a little bit more about yourself, your organization, really your passion and your initiative and, and really why you love our community.

Arch Wright  
Mm hmm. Great, great stuff. Thanks, Jessica. And I’m excited to be here. I know Mary Christa is part of your program and I’ve known her for a few years and loved the work and, and contribution she’s done to our community. And it’s great to know you now we’ve been connecting a fair amount recently. And I love connection, his wellness connection, his recovery, I forget exactly how you put it, but connection is, you know, I’ll talk about me in just a second. But that is just a perfect, there’s no more fundamental topic. And in my experience, and opinion, then connection, actually, I believe it’s it’s our greatest human need. I also believe that even prior to COVID, that it’s our greatest fear overall. So and that’s all of us have some hesitation on some level with connection. So there’s great opportunity there in looking at that. So I really appreciate and value that that’s such a big focus and the mission of community that cares, community Communities That Care. So so my background, you know, yeah, I’m probably just hearing the bio is like, yeah, you know, I was ski racing as a young guy, and then got into corporate finance and all of that. But really what happened was in between those two things, I hit bottom with drug and alcohol addiction. I was living in Park City and I had a pretty good ski racing career going and, you know, I, I hit bottom and couldn’t keep it together from a habit that I had that started as a teenager, but that actually ski racing probably honestly probably saved my life. And in my opinion, I was somehow miraculously got out of my little Michigan hometown and, and was able to go to a ski Academy out east and, and and so ski racing and athletics in general were a very positive force in my life. And so I’m grateful for that. So I had a fair amount of success ski racing, it was definitely starts and stops as I was struggling with my my escalating addiction. So I did hit bottom at 23 years old in the early 1984, to be specific, and, and I was living here and I took off and went to rehab and I’ve been clean and sober myself and very active in the recovery communities ever since. So, you know, that that was going on. And, and meanwhile, I started back to school and because that had been derailed, and I saw I began college at 24 years old and, and that’s what I ended up in business and, and 22 years of corporate finance, with a couple of big companies and some Wall Street work and and then about 15 years or so ago, I started noticing that I was struggling in other areas of my life, in relationships, and around money. And, and so I went back to work with therapists and my own self study, and I started looking deeper into why I was having such challenges. My kids were turning into adolescence, and that I’m Lots of viewers will shake their heads, that’s a different parenting skill. And, and I wasn’t doing so well with that I had a lot of anger. And, and, and I was realizing how lonely I was in an in a life that looked really good on the outside, my wife and I were very successful in our careers. And, you know, we had the big house on the hill and in the nice cars and the awesome kids and but I was really realizing how empty I was inside. So that began a process of working as a financial consultant in the addiction treatment field actually, and beginning to do intervention work because I understood addiction. And I started to chip away at a master’s degree in towards becoming a therapist. But I really didn’t think I wanted to be one that just sort of grew. And what happened is about six or seven years ago, my marriage was really on the rocks, and we did end up getting divorced. And that was a healthy thing. And I think she would agree to we have a great relationship. Now. Both of my children were struggling, they’re doing well now, but, and my only sibling died from his addiction in his 40s. And I just kind of had one of those life experiences where I said, You know what, I’m going to back out of all this finance stuff, I really like what I’m learning in school at that time. And, and I’m going to move in towards being a psychotherapist. And that’s sort of the history of how it’s come to where I have the both businesses the psychotherapy practice in the intervention business.

Jessica Crate  
Fantastic. Well, you know, you have gone through the fire and come out on top. And that’s what I love most about your story is that you’re a thriver and really and you You not only that you’re taking the lessons that you’ve learned over the course of your not only your life, but your career and, and you’re putting it to us to help other people prevent that ever happening to them. So I love that your your passion stems from having gone through it yourself. So let’s talk more about you know, how your organization, Foster’s mental health and homeless in our community?

Arch Wright  
Sure, yeah. You bet. Yeah, both of both in the in the therapy practice and in our intervention work with families. We we come at our work, our I’m with my spouse, I think in the bio, we both run the intervention business, but we work through a trauma lens. And, you know, that’s a, that actually, what’s happened is that is our approach and how we foster health and wellness in our community has followed the path of my own personal journey where I began discovering 30 years ago, how important it is to connect with trauma in childhood. Yeah. And that is, that is the that’s the basis of my practice. As a therapist, as I I’m continuing to get the most current cutting edge, clinical certifications around developmental and attachment trauma. I believe all human beings had some of it, and the way that we adapt to trauma hit, you know, there’s a wide spectrum of severity there, of course, so, so I work with every one of my clients, and I do a fair amount of pro bono work on the side. Speaking and, and I’m I opened my practice to try and to have a certain number of slots for people who can’t afford treatment, in therapy, my spouse, and I do, we counsel families, when we have the time and are able to do it, you know, in a pro bono level, and we both work in our personal lives quite actively, every week, if not almost every day in the local recovery community from recovering from substance abuse and process addictions. So, but it’s all through a trauma lens, we, you know, even the term addict and an alcoholic, which I’ve identified, I’m a recovering alcoholic, I’m a recovering addict, but really what I am is I’m healing and expanding from my childhood trauma, and it’s actually intergenerational trauma, it’s my parents are healing and, and, and expanding from their trauma. And it’s so it’s not a blame game. It’s just let’s tap into what we have inside of us. That’s been blocked from, you know, truly living a vibrant sort of life force presence.

Jessica Crate  
Absolutely love that so powerful and so interconnected. You know, all of the work that you do is very synergistic and propelling people forward and helping them to you know, Be aware and recognize that So, having gone through that yourself, I’m sure it’s a lot easier to be able to help people recognize that too. So, you know, those of you tuning in, you know, if you, if you any of this resonates, please reach out to arch. We’ll have all of his information below. And he is an amazing resource to help people navigate these, these treacherous waters so to speak. Let’s Let’s dive a little bit deeper into you know, what role do you think you know, you’re very well connected to our community. You’ve been in Park City for many years. Now with a business here. Now what role do you think community connected connectedness Say that three times fast plays in our mental health during COVID? And and how is the pandemic affected people’s ability to stay connected? And maybe what do you foresee for this year?

Arch Wright  
Well, you know, that, again, through my, through my lens of how I view my own life now and how I work as a practitioner, a clinician, there is a certain degree of, well, what the COVID has done, is, it’s at the very least what it’s done is it’s triggered unresolved trauma in all of us that was there long before COVID. Yeah, absolutely. Mm hmm. And, and some of the words, so the opposite of connection is disconnection. You know, before we had to be living in this environment of disconnection physically, and with our masks in which, you know, we need for safety, of course, but, but the disconnection that we have going on now is just a very unfortunate, you know, hopefully, it’s not much longer, but it’s a very unfortunate, you know, real physical manifestation of the disconnection within each of us that happened gradually, or suddenly, there’s different kinds of trauma, there’s developmental trauma, which is over time, which is, you know, patterns, less than nurturing experience 90% of it is not any kind of overt trauma that a lot of us attach with that we’re talking about physical abuse, sexual abuse, it’s, it’s more subtle, it’s a lack of connection, where we feel safe, it’s in when we’re younger, and our brains aren’t fully developed, it doesn’t take much to not feel safe, and we actually end up becoming disorganized, in our, our biological and psychological selves. So we’re walking around, most of us are walking around with less than 100% self worth, I mean, it can be really crushed, or it can be just a little bit off. And then we also have emotional dysregulation. And this is really, I mean, this the studies, which in the world I work in, because it’s not very attached with Big Pharma. You know, we don’t see a lot of information on this. And it’s a slow fix, and a lot of work to resolve the disorganization and disconnection that we have in us from not just family type of less than nurturing trauma experience, unintended, that’s passed along, but also cultural trauma. But so what’s happened in COVID, is that without we don’t realize it, but that’s, that’s frightening us, we do realize that I think most of us can say where we’re anxious, at the very least, if not afraid, and that literally triggers the unresolved stuff that’s in our on our conscious unconsciously and held in us. So that’s, you know, so we need to, we need to be aware of that, then it’s a bigger thing going on inside of us, which is really kind of strange to say right now, because there’s a lot of stuff that’s changed in our lives, you know, this virus is deadly. And all of the, the response to the virus has created massive change in our lives that create financial fear. You know, there’s domestic violence on the rise, there’s substance abuse on the rise. So and relational, a lot of this stuff, our trauma results in relational challenges. So you know, and so the triggers that too, because we’re, we’re shut down and closer to those who we love, but where the relationships are more complex to begin with.

Jessica Crate  
Mm hmm. It’s powerful because, you know, humans were wired to connect and to love and be loved and just to have that, you know, and that’s part of the reason you know, when you’re born, you’re placed on your mother’s chest to have that connection. And, you know, that’s really where, what we’re fostered to have throughout life. So I know this pandemic has caused people to truly shrink back. And that causes so many other things. So it’s so important to stay connected. So let’s talk about, you know, what, what can you share are just from your experience with us about the mental and emotional impacts of being in a chronic pandemic? And what recommend recommendations do you have to help people cope and thrive, maybe some action items, some tips and tools? Maybe some resources that you can share with our viewers here today?

Arch Wright  
Sure, well, you know, I mean, that the standard ones are exercise, get outside. If you know.

Jessica Crate  
We live in a mecca for it

Arch Wright  
If you’re not doing that, and you live here, you know, come on. So, you know, exercise is huge mindfulness, practice meditation, yoga, that’s maybe maybe even a little higher than exercise, honestly, and I’m an exercise fanatic, but, but that’s a that’s, that’s really, really important. So, and that, but but I’m gonna say that actually connecting with others, you know, stay safe. But get out there and do it. And do it the way you and I are doing it now. Yeah. So don’t, don’t accept, Don’t settle for what we have to do. You know, do it, respect what we have to do. But don’t fall into a groove, make yourself get out and connect with people. And again, if it’s if it’s remotely and that’s been one of the pluses, I think that’s happened. I know, in the, in the, for example, in the 12 step recovery world, which there’s 220 different programs. Now a was the first one, but there’s, there’s a bunch of them for relationships and for process addictions. And, you know, that whole world has opened up to where people are doing meetings to look at their issues in like, in West Palm Beach, or LA and they’re sitting here in Park City. And these, this stuff’s all available for free out in the internet, you can you can google these organizations, most people have heard of Al anon and codependents anonymous and adult children of alcoholics and a and so you can, you know, right from your, your, your living room, you can be connecting from 5am to midnight with other people and starting to have connection that way. So, but I would like to dig a little deeper in what I think people need to be considering and get to be considering is more of an existential shift, like meaning and purpose in life and taking this as an opportunity to slow down. You know, I mean, there’s a lot of it that’s forced on us. But take I know, you know, there’s, there’s a lot of people in my world in my personal life and in my professional life. And myself, I’ve taken this last year as the opportunity to really, and I’ve gotten help, I’m a therapist who has a therapist, and if you have a therapist that doesn’t have a therapist, I considered that you rethink that, personally. But you know, I’ve just done a lot of looking at my life and checking with my feelings. You know, if you there’s another habit you can work working to is find a standard list of basic emotions. I use one from the meadows in Arizona, you can google the metals, I used to work there as a therapist. It’s eight basic emotions, anger, pain, fear, joy, passion, love, shame, and guilt, and find something to where you and your spouse or you and whoever is, you know, older than teenagers can work for sure to actually it’s one of the best parenting tools you can do is connect on emotions, takes five minutes to say, hey, let’s do a feelings check here. And so, you know, when, you know, it’s great to talk about, you know, how was your ski day and, you know, what do you think about politics, although, that’s probably not a good thing for us to be talking about, for emotional regulation, but check in on feelings and, and and maybe, you know, decide to set some boundaries where you’ve known you’ve needed to set some boundaries in your life, emotional boundaries, physical boundaries, you know, that kind of thing. So, you know, sort of a retrenching settling, rededication to self you know, is what I think is the great opportunity for this. This environment we’re in

Jessica Crate  
Fantastic I love it you know, self care has been a profound theme that has you know, been a way better raised up during this time and you know, self care and setting boundaries and making sure that your mental emotional physical being is performing at your best before you can go help others but making sure that you take those action steps to you know, get outdoors get exercise, get sunshine, you know, connect on a zoom, pick up the phone like we did old school right and have a common So some great tips are just thanks so much. I hope you guys are taking notes and great nuggets here that arch is dropping. Next question for you, you know, what is one action item someone can do today, right now, to foster their well being during this time for ourselves and to stay connected, you touched on a lot, but if you could pick one, what is the highlight that you wanted, that you want to stand out?

Arch Wright  
You know, I would say an action item is to do an inventory within yourself as to who in your life you feel is a closed mouth, grounded, seemingly, you know, sort of at peace, confident. And this could be someone from the past, too. But in closed mouth is important that you can trust. You know, and sure if it’s a therapist, that’s great. But that doesn’t have to be that way. And and in some cases, you know, hopefully, you’ve got a really good one. But I’m the first to say, you know, there’s money in the therapy relationship. So I’m really talking about somebody else. And you know, to where you can just sit down and talk about your feelings. And that’s whatever that one thing is, it’s got to be around feelings, the average person from their trauma and then COVID has jacked it up 10 times is disconnected from what’s really going on emotionally. And so you know, whether it’s making an appointment with your your therapist, finding a new therapist, getting with a very close friend who can just take it down and not try to rescue or fix, you know, that’s in a good therapist shouldn’t try to rescue or fix feelings, they should just be present. And, you know, so do some and journaling might be a one thing in terms of a behavior to do begin a journaling process. But emotional connection, emotional awareness, is what’s sorely lacking in, in people always has been and right now I would say that’s, that’s gonna deliver a lot. And in terms of a sense of inner peace and, and comfort and connection.

Jessica Crate  
Absolutely. Just finding someone that you can bounce ideas off, bounce frustrations off, you know, talk about how you’re feeling and navigate through those emotions is so key to for your own peace of mind. So love that art. Now, my favorite question is, if you could wave your magic wand, what would you like to create or see in our community during, you know, this time, the shift in our world moving forward?

Arch Wright  
I would say a heightened sense of how everybody with what I just shared earlier, that what trauma creates down at its lowest lowest level. And again, if you want to buy off with what I said that we all have some degree of trauma that’s unresolved in us. And it’s getting triggered again. And there’s two things that come from unresolved trauma, it’s fear, which is can just be anxiety. Anxiety is actually defined as a signal that something is unresolved in US fear, and, and shame. some degree of I’m not enough, I don’t matter, I’m not worthy. So those two things. So the fear thing in general, I would say, if if I could wave a wand, everyone would have a heightened sense of awareness of their own internal fears, and that every single person walking around them, whether they’re in Whole Foods, or in their own home, has some fear going on inside of them. And they’re really just seeking like a child does theirs. They’re seeking connection and safety in their in their lives. And I think that that can that that one waving thing, if everybody had a little more of that we’d have more compassion, compassionate boundaries, too, though, that the the rescuing and caretaking thing is possibly the worst addiction there is. So watch out for those when you’re talking about your fears, want to swoop in and avoid their own lives and smother you. .

Jessica Crate  
Fantastic. So true and so important. Now, you know, you’ve been part of this community for a long time. And, you know, how does Communities That Care help you in your work and and being part of this community? Because as I always say, it takes a village to talk to us a little bit more about that.

 

Arch Wright  

Well, yeah, I mean, in all honesty, I’m sort of reconnecting I first heard of Communities That Care Gosh, Mary Christa could say but I want to say six, seven years ago where there were some other organizations and and I don’t really know a lot about it. So this is exciting for me to be Back connected, but I know how you operate, I’ve really enjoyed our connection over the last few months and, and the topics that we covered today. And so, you know, I think anything that helps Foster and promote connection, and, and in particular, in particular, all of the stuff that’s aimed at connecting with and being there for our youth. And you know that that’s where, you know, but but the the the trick there is that inside of us, if we’ve got unresolved trauma, we’re all just kind of children acting as adults. So, so this the stuff that Communities That Care, does, to reach children and to reach the child and each of us in a loving, accepting boundary sort of way, I’m in full support of.

 

Jessica Crate  

love it. Well, we appreciate you being part of this, you’re such an integral part of you know, our community and and helping people thrive. So we’re so grateful for you to not only beyond here today, but for all the work that you do here in Park City and beyond. And I know this is going to touch a lot of lives. So you guys drop out some love. And lastly, before we let you go, I always like to ask our interviewees you know, what is your slogan quote, saying? mantra? What is? What would you like to leave our viewers as part of your legacy?

 

Arch Wright  

Um, there’s a Rumi quote, which I wish I wish I could do exactly. But it’s something about, you know, not not so much seeking love, but seeking the blockage that we have that keeps us from loving ourselves and others. So I think so I think curiosity and courage and and trust in the right places are something that we all have in front of us more than maybe some of us have in our whole lives.

 

Jessica Crate  

Fantastic. So spot on art. Thank you so much for being part of this today. I know you’ve added value to my life and to our community. So thank you again. And you know, for those of you tuning in, you can find a link to all of our podcasts and video blog on CTC summit county.org. And we’d love to have you on here again, and you know, any of you who have tips, feedback, please send us our way. We have a lot of great resources on our website, as well as our blog. So thanks again, arch for tuning in. And for those of you listening, sharing this out, we appreciate your support. So have a wonderful day and we’ll talk to y’all soon. Bye for now.

 

“Utilizamos un servicio automatizado para esta traducción. Somos conscientes de que puede haber errores y agradecemos su comprensión”.

Jessica Crate  
Todo bien. Buenos días a todos y bienvenidos a los lunes de salud mental con Communities That Care o podcast de video y en CTC Summit County nuestra visión es un mundo de conexión, vitalidad y bienestar donde los niños y las familias prosperen. Por eso, nuestra misión es, en colaboración, mejorar la vida de los jóvenes y las familias fomentando una cultura de la salud a través de la prevención. Y entonces la conexión es realmente prevención. Y hoy, me complace presentar a nuestro querido amigo Arch Wright, Arch es un graduado de la Escuela de Negocios Ross de la Universidad de Michigan. Es un ex ejecutivo de finanzas corporativas y ex miembro del equipo de esquí alpino de EE. UU., Estrella de rock. Así que hoy tiene una maestría en consejería de salud mental y es un psicoterapeuta licenciado e intervencionista que residió en Park City a finales de los 70. Y a principios de los 80, durante sus días en las carreras de esquí, y se mudó hasta 2012, cuando regresó para instalarse como residente permanente Arch, su práctica privada aquí hoy se encuentra en el cruce de Kimball, y él y su esposa operan una empresa de intervención en el mercado nacional. Está casado y es padre de dos hijos adultos. Y hoy, estamos muy emocionados de sumergirnos en tu arco y aprender un poco más sobre ti. Entonces, cuéntenos un poco más sobre usted, su organización, realmente su pasión y su iniciativa y, y realmente, por qué ama a nuestra comunidad.

Arch Wright  
Mm hmm. Genial, genial. Gracias, Jessica. Y estoy emocionado de estar aquí. Sé que Mary Christa es parte de su programa y la conozco desde hace algunos años y me encanta el trabajo y la contribución que ha hecho a nuestra comunidad. Y es genial saber que hemos estado conectando bastante recientemente. Y me encanta la conexión, su conexión de bienestar, su recuperación, olvido exactamente cómo lo expresas, pero la conexión es, ya sabes, hablaré de mí en solo un segundo. Pero eso es perfecto, no hay más tema fundamental. Y en mi experiencia y opinión, luego la conexión, en realidad, creo que es nuestra mayor necesidad humana. También creo que incluso antes de COVID, ese es nuestro mayor temor en general. Entonces, todos tenemos algunas dudas en algún nivel con la conexión. Así que hay una gran oportunidad al ver eso. Así que realmente aprecio y valoro que ese sea un enfoque tan grande y la misión de la comunidad que se preocupa, las comunidades comunitarias que se preocupan. Entonces, mi experiencia, ya sabes, sí, probablemente solo estoy escuchando que la biografía es como, sí, ya sabes, estaba corriendo de esquí cuando era joven, y luego me metí en finanzas corporativas y todo eso. Pero realmente lo que sucedió fue entre esas dos cosas, toqué fondo con la adicción a las drogas y al alcohol. Vivía en Park City y tenía una carrera bastante buena en las carreras de esquí y, ya sabes, toqué fondo y no pude evitar un hábito que tenía cuando era adolescente, pero que en realidad las carreras de esquí. probablemente honestamente probablemente me salvó la vida. Y en mi opinión, de alguna manera salí milagrosamente de mi pequeña ciudad natal de Michigan y pude ir a una academia de esquí en el este y, por lo tanto, las carreras de esquí y el atletismo en general fueron una fuerza muy positiva en mi vida. Y por eso estoy agradecido por eso. Así que tuve bastante éxito en las carreras de esquí, definitivamente fueron arranques y paradas mientras luchaba con mi creciente adicción. Así que toqué fondo a los 23 años a principios de 1984, para ser específico, y yo estaba viviendo aquí y me fui a rehabilitación y he estado limpio y sobrio y muy activo en las comunidades de recuperación. ya que. Entonces, ya sabes, eso estaba pasando. Y, mientras tanto, volví a la escuela y porque eso se había descarrilado, y vi que comencé la universidad a los 24 años y, y eso es lo que terminé en negocios y, y 22 años en finanzas corporativas, con un par de grandes empresas y algo de trabajo en Wall Street y luego, hace unos 15 años, comencé a notar que estaba luchando en otras áreas de mi vida, en las relaciones y en el dinero. Y, entonces, volví a trabajar con terapeutas y a mi propio estudio personal, y comencé a investigar más profundamente por qué tenía tales desafíos. Mis hijos se estaban acercando a la adolescencia, y que yo soy. Muchos espectadores negarán con la cabeza, esa es una habilidad de crianza diferente. Y, y no me estaba yendo tan bien con eso, tenía mucha ira. Y, y, y me estaba dando cuenta de lo solo que estaba en una vida que se veía realmente bien por fuera, mi esposa y yo tuvimos mucho éxito en nuestras carreras. Y, ya sabes, teníamos la casa grande en la colina y en los autos agradables y los niños increíbles, pero realmente me estaba dando cuenta de lo vacío que estaba por dentro. Así que comenzó un proceso de trabajo como consultor financiero en el campo del tratamiento de adicciones, y comencé a hacer trabajo de intervención porque entendí la adicción. Y comencé a reducir una maestría para convertirme en terapeuta. Pero realmente no pensé que quería ser uno que simplemente creciera. Y lo que sucedió fue hace unos seis o siete años, mi matrimonio estaba realmente en dificultades y terminamos divorciándonos. Y eso fue algo saludable. Y creo que estaría de acuerdo en que tengamos una gran relación. Ahora. Mis dos hijos estaban luchando, les va bien ahora, pero mi único hermano murió de su adicción a los 40 años. Y simplemente tuve una de esas experiencias de vida en las que dije: ¿Sabes qué ?, voy a dar marcha atrás en todas estas cosas financieras, me gusta mucho lo que estoy aprendiendo en la escuela en ese momento. Y voy a pasar a ser psicoterapeuta. Y esa es una especie de historia de cómo ha llegado a donde tengo los dos negocios, la práctica de la psicoterapia en el negocio de la intervención.

Jessica Crate  
Fantástico. Bueno, ya sabes, has pasado por el fuego y saliste arriba. Y eso es lo que más me gusta de tu historia es que eres un prospero y realmente y tú no solo estás tomando las lecciones que has aprendido a lo largo de tu vida, no solo tu vida, sino tu carrera y, y nos lo está pidiendo para ayudar a otras personas a evitar que eso les suceda. Por eso me encanta que tu pasión nazca de haberla pasado tú mismo. Entonces, hablemos más sobre usted sabe, ¿cómo su organización, la salud mental de Foster y las personas sin hogar en nuestra comunidad?

Arch Wright  
Claro que sí. Usted apuesta. Sí, tanto en la práctica de la terapia como en nuestro trabajo de intervención con las familias. Venimos a nuestro trabajo, nuestro yo estoy con mi cónyuge, creo que en la biografía, ambos dirigimos el negocio de la intervención, pero trabajamos a través de una lente de trauma. Y, ya sabes, eso es, que en realidad, lo que sucedió es que ese es nuestro enfoque y cómo fomentamos la salud y el bienestar en nuestra comunidad ha seguido el camino de mi propio viaje personal donde comencé a descubrir hace 30 años, lo importante que es para conectar con el trauma en la niñez. Si. Y eso es, esa es la base de mi práctica. Como terapeuta, continúo obteniendo las certificaciones clínicas de vanguardia más actualizadas sobre el trauma del desarrollo y el apego. Creo que todos los seres humanos tuvieron algo de eso, y la forma en que nos adaptamos al trauma golpeó, ya sabes, hay un amplio espectro de gravedad allí, por supuesto, así que trabajo con cada uno de mis clientes, y hago un una buena cantidad de trabajo pro bono adicional. Hablando y, y yo, abrí mi práctica para intentar tener un cierto número de espacios para personas que no pueden pagar el tratamiento, en terapia, mi cónyuge y yo, asesoramos a las familias, cuando tenemos el tiempo y somos capaces de hacerlo, ya sabes, en un nivel pro bono, y ambos trabajamos en nuestras vidas personales de manera bastante activa, todas las semanas, si no casi todos los días, en la comunidad de recuperación local de la recuperación del abuso de sustancias y las adicciones a los procesos. Entonces, pero todo es a través de una lente de trauma, nosotros, ya sabes, incluso el término adicto y alcohólico, que he identificado, soy un alcohólico en recuperación, soy un adicto en recuperación, pero realmente lo que soy es yo. Me estoy recuperando y expandiéndome de mi trauma infantil, y en realidad es un trauma intergeneracional, son mis padres y se están curando y expandiéndose de su trauma. Y no es un juego de culpas. Es solo que aprovechemos lo que tenemos dentro de nosotros. Eso ha sido bloqueado de, ya sabes, vivir verdaderamente una especie de presencia vibrante de fuerza vital.

Jessica Crate  
Absolutamente amo eso tan poderoso y tan interconectado. Ya sabes, todo el trabajo que haces es muy sinérgico e impulsa a las personas hacia adelante y les ayuda a que lo sepas. Sé consciente y reconoce eso. Entonces, habiendo pasado por eso tú mismo, estoy seguro de que es mucho más fácil poder ayudar. la gente también reconoce eso. Entonces, ya saben, aquellos de ustedes que sintonizan, ya saben, si ustedes, si algo de esto resuena, comuníquese con Arch. Tendremos toda su información a continuación. Y es un recurso increíble para ayudar a la gente a navegar por estas, estas aguas traicioneras, por así decirlo. Vamos a sumergirnos un poco más en lo que sabes, qué rol crees que sabes, estás muy bien conectado con nuestra comunidad. Llevas muchos años en Park City. Ahora con un negocio aquí. Ahora, ¿qué papel crees que tiene la conexión con la comunidad? Digamos que tres veces más rápido juega en nuestra salud mental durante COVID. ¿Y cómo ha afectado la pandemia la capacidad de las personas para mantenerse conectadas? ¿Y tal vez qué prevé para este año?

Arch Wright  
Bueno, ya sabes, que, de nuevo, a través de mi, a través de mi lente de cómo veo mi propia vida ahora y cómo trabajo como médico, como médico, hay un cierto grado de, bueno, lo que ha hecho el COVID, es , es al menos lo que ha hecho es que ha desencadenado un trauma no resuelto en todos nosotros que estaba allí mucho antes de COVID. Si absolutamente. Mm hmm. Y, y algunas de las palabras, lo opuesto a conexión es desconexión. Ya sabes, antes teníamos que estar viviendo en este ambiente de desconexión física, y con nuestras máscaras en las que, ya sabes, necesitamos seguridad, claro, pero, pero la desconexión que tenemos pasando ahora es solo una muy lamentable , usted sabe, con suerte, no es mucho más largo, pero es una manifestación física real muy desafortunada de la desconexión dentro de cada uno de nosotros que sucedió gradualmente, o de repente, hay diferentes tipos de trauma, hay trauma del desarrollo, que se acabó. tiempo, que es, ya sabes, patrones, menos que una experiencia enriquecedora. El 90% no es ningún tipo de trauma manifiesto que muchos de nosotros asociamos con el que estamos hablando de abuso físico, abuso sexual, es, es más sutil, es una falta de conexión, donde nos sentimos seguros, es cuando somos más jóvenes, y nuestros cerebros no están completamente desarrollados, no se necesita mucho para no sentirnos seguros, y en realidad terminamos desorganizados, en nuestro, nuestro yo biológico y psicológico. Así que estamos caminando, la mayoría de nosotros caminamos con menos del 100% de autoestima, quiero decir, puede ser realmente aplastado, o puede estar un poco apagado. Y luego también tenemos una desregulación emocional. Y esto es realmente, quiero decir, estos estudios, en el mundo en el que trabajo, porque no está muy apegado a las grandes farmacéuticas.Sabes, no vemos mucha información sobre esto. Y es una solución lenta, y mucho trabajo para resolver la desorganización y la desconexión que tenemos en nosotros no solo del tipo familiar de una experiencia traumática menos enriquecedora, no intencional, que se transmite, sino también del trauma cultural. Pero lo que sucedió en COVID es que sin nosotros no nos damos cuenta, pero eso nos asusta, nos damos cuenta de que creo que la mayoría de nosotros podemos decir dónde estamos ansiosos, al menos, si no asustados, y eso literalmente desencadena las cosas no resueltas que están en nuestro consciente inconscientemente y retenidas en nosotros. Así que eso es, ya sabes, así que tenemos que hacerlo, tenemos que ser conscientes de eso, entonces es algo más grande que está sucediendo dentro de nosotros, lo cual es realmente extraño decirlo en este momento, porque hay muchas cosas que han cambiado en nuestras vidas, ya sabes, este virus es mortal. Y todo eso, la respuesta al virus ha creado un cambio masivo en nuestras vidas que crea miedo financiero. Sabes, hay un aumento de la violencia doméstica, hay un aumento del abuso de sustancias. Entonces y relacional, muchas de estas cosas, nuestro trauma resulta en desafíos relacionales. Así que ya sabes, y eso también lo desencadena, porque estamos cerrados y más cerca de aquellos a quienes amamos, pero donde las relaciones son más complejas para empezar.

Jessica Crate  
Mm hmm. Es poderoso porque, ya sabes, los humanos estaban conectados para conectar y amar y ser amados y solo para tener eso, ya sabes, y esa es parte de la razón por la que sabes, cuando naces, te colocan en el pecho de tu madre. tener esa conexión. Y, ya sabes, ahí es realmente lo que nos anima a tener durante toda la vida. Entonces sé que esta pandemia ha hecho que la gente realmente se retraiga. Y eso causa tantas otras cosas. Por eso es muy importante estar conectado. Así que hablemos de, ya sabes, qué, qué puedes compartir de tu experiencia con nosotros sobre los impactos mentales y emocionales de estar en una pandemia crónica. ¿Y qué recomendaciones tiene para ayudar a las personas a salir adelante y prosperar, tal vez algunos elementos de acción, algunos consejos y herramientas? ¿Quizás algunos recursos que puedas compartir con nuestros espectadores aquí hoy?

Arch Wright  
Claro, bueno, ya sabes, quiero decir, que los estándares son ejercicio, sal afuera. Si usted sabe.

Jessica Crate  
Vivimos en una meca por eso

Arch Wright  
Si no estás haciendo eso y vives aquí, ya sabes, vamos. Entonces, ya sabes, el ejercicio es una gran atención plena, la práctica de la meditación, el yoga, eso es tal vez incluso un poco más alto que el ejercicio, honestamente, y soy un fanático del ejercicio, pero eso es, eso es muy, muy importante. Entonces, y eso, pero voy a decir que realmente conectarse con otros, ya sabes, mantente a salvo. Pero sal y hazlo. Y hazlo de la forma en que tú y yo lo estamos haciendo ahora. Si. Así que no, no aceptes, no te conformes con lo que tenemos que hacer. Ya sabes, hazlo, respeta lo que tenemos que hacer. Pero no caigas en un ritmo, sal y conecta con la gente. Y nuevamente, si es de forma remota y esa ha sido una de las ventajas, creo que eso sucedió. Sé, en el, en el, por ejemplo, en el mundo de la recuperación de 12 pasos, que hay 220 programas diferentes. Ahora, a fue el primero, pero hay, hay un montón de ellos para las relaciones y para las adicciones al proceso. Y, ya sabes, todo el mundo se ha abierto al lugar donde la gente está haciendo reuniones para analizar sus problemas en West Palm Beach o Los Ángeles y están sentados aquí en Park City. Y todo esto, todo esto está disponible de forma gratuita en Internet, puede buscar en Google estas organizaciones, la mayoría de la gente ha oído hablar de Al anon y codependientes anónimos e hijos adultos de alcohólicos y así usted puede, ya sabe, directamente de su , tu, tu sala de estar, puedes conectarte desde las 5 am hasta la medianoche con otras personas y comenzar a tener conexión de esa manera. Entonces, pero me gustaría profundizar un poco más en lo que creo que la gente debe considerar y llegar a considerar es más un cambio existencial, como el significado y el propósito en la vida y tomar esto como una oportunidad para desacelerar. Sabes, quiero decir, hay mucho de eso que se nos impone. Pero toma, sé, ya sabes, hay mucha gente en mi mundo en mi vida personal y en mi vida profesional.Y yo mismo, aproveché este último año como la oportunidad de realmente, y obtuve ayuda, soy un terapeuta que tiene un terapeuta, y si tienes un terapeuta que no tiene un terapeuta, lo consideré lo repensas, personalmente. Pero ya sabes, acabo de mirar mucho mi vida y comprobar mis sentimientos. Ya sabes, si hay otro hábito en el que puedes trabajar es encontrar una lista estándar de emociones básicas. Utilizo uno de los prados en Arizona, puedes buscar en Google los metales, solía trabajar allí como terapeuta. Son ocho emociones básicas, ira, dolor, miedo, alegría, pasión, amor, vergüenza y culpa, y encontrar algo en lo que tú y tu cónyuge o tú y quien sea, ya sabes, mayor que los adolescentes pueden trabajar con seguridad en realidad es Una de las mejores herramientas de crianza que puede hacer es conectarse con las emociones, toma cinco minutos decir, oye, hagamos una verificación de sentimientos aquí. Y entonces, ya sabes, cuando, ya sabes, es genial hablar sobre, ya sabes, cómo fue tu día de esquí y, ya sabes, qué piensas sobre política, aunque, probablemente no sea bueno para nosotros estar hablando acerca de la regulación emocional, pero controle los sentimientos y, y tal vez, ya sabe, decida establecer algunos límites en los que haya sabido que necesitaba establecer algunos límites en su vida, límites emocionales, límites físicos, ya sabe , ese tipo de cosas. Entonces, ya sabes, una especie de reducción de asentamiento, una nueva dedicación a uno mismo, ya sabes, es lo que creo que es la gran oportunidad para esto. Este entorno en el que estamos

Jessica Crate  
Fantástico, me encanta, ya sabes, el autocuidado ha sido un tema profundo que, ¿sabes ?, ha sido una manera mejor planteada durante este tiempo y ya sabes, el autocuidado y el establecimiento de límites y asegurándote de que tu ser físico, emocional y mental esté funcionando a tu nivel. mejor antes de que pueda ir a ayudar a los demás, pero asegúrese de tomar esos pasos de acción para saberlo, salir al aire libre, hacer ejercicio, tomar el sol, ya sabe, conectarse con un zoom, levantar el teléfono como lo hicimos en la vieja escuela y tener un común Así que gracias a algunos buenos consejos. Espero que estén tomando notas y grandes pepitas aquí que el arco está cayendo. La siguiente pregunta para usted, ya sabe, cuál es un elemento de acción que alguien puede hacer hoy, ahora mismo, para fomentar su bienestar durante este tiempo para nosotros y para mantenernos conectados, mencionó mucho, pero si pudiera elegir uno, ¿qué ¿Es el punto culminante que querías, que quieres destacar?

Arch Wright  
Sabes, yo diría que un elemento de acción es hacer un inventario dentro de ti mismo sobre quién en tu vida sientes que tiene la boca cerrada, con los pies en la tierra, aparentemente, ya sabes, algo en paz, confiado. Y este también podría ser alguien del pasado. Pero en boca cerrada es importante que puedas confiar. Ya sabes, y seguro que si es un terapeuta, eso es genial. Pero eso no tiene por qué ser así. Y, en algunos casos, sabes, con suerte, tienes uno realmente bueno. Pero soy el primero en decir, sabes, hay dinero en la relación de terapia. Entonces realmente estoy hablando de otra persona. Y ya sabes, donde puedes simplemente sentarte y hablar sobre tus sentimientos. Y eso es lo que sea, tiene que estar en torno a los sentimientos, la persona promedio de su trauma y luego COVID lo ha subido 10 veces está desconectada de lo que realmente está sucediendo emocionalmente. Y para que lo sepas, ya sea concertar una cita con tu terapeuta, encontrar un nuevo terapeuta, reunirte con un amigo muy cercano que pueda simplemente eliminarlo y no tratar de rescatarlo o arreglarlo, ya sabes, eso es lo que un buen terapeuta debería hacer. Para tratar de rescatar o arreglar los sentimientos, simplemente deben estar presentes. Y, ya sabes, haz algo y escribir en un diario podría ser una cosa en términos de comportamiento para comenzar un proceso de llevar un diario. Pero la conexión emocional, la conciencia emocional, es lo que más falta, en la gente siempre ha existido y ahora mismo diría que eso va a ofrecer mucho. Y en términos de una sensación de paz interior y comodidad y conexión.

Jessica Crate  
Absolutamente. El solo hecho de encontrar a alguien con quien puedas intercambiar ideas, eliminar frustraciones, ya sabes, hablar sobre cómo te sientes y navegar a través de esas emociones es clave para tu propia tranquilidad. Así que ama ese arte. Ahora, mi pregunta favorita es, si pudieras agitar tu varita mágica, ¿qué te gustaría crear o ver en nuestra comunidad durante, ya sabes, esta vez, el cambio en nuestro mundo en el futuro?

Arch Wright  
Diría un sentido elevado de cómo todos con lo que acabo de compartir antes, que el trauma crea en su nivel más bajo más bajo. Y de nuevo, si quiere comprar con lo que dije, todos tenemos algún grado de trauma que no se ha resuelto en nosotros. Y se activa de nuevo. Y hay dos cosas que provienen de un trauma no resuelto, es el miedo, que puede ser solo ansiedad. En realidad, la ansiedad se define como una señal de que algo no está resuelto en el miedo y la vergüenza de EE. en cierto grado no soy suficiente, no importo, no soy digno. Entonces esas dos cosas. Entonces, lo del miedo en general, diría, si pudiera agitar una varita, todos tendrían un mayor sentido de conciencia de sus propios miedos internos, y de que cada persona que camina a su alrededor, ya sea en Whole Foods, o en su propia casa, tiene algo de miedo dentro de ellos. Y en realidad solo buscan como lo hace un niño. Buscan conexión y seguridad en sus vidas. Y creo que eso puede ser esa cosa que agita, si todos tuvieran un poco más de eso, tendríamos más compasión, límites compasivos, también, sin embargo, que lo de rescatar y cuidar es posiblemente la peor adicción que existe. Así que ten cuidado con aquellos cuando hablas de tus miedos, quieren abalanzarse y evitar sus propias vidas y asfixiarte. .

Jessica Crate  
Fantástico. Tan cierto y tan importante. Ya sabes, has sido parte de esta comunidad durante mucho tiempo. Y, ya sabes, ¿cómo te ayuda Communities That Care en tu trabajo y en ser parte de esta comunidad? Porque como siempre digo, hace falta un pueblo para hablarnos un poco más de eso.

Arch Wright  
Bueno, sí, quiero decir, con toda honestidad, me estoy volviendo a conectar. Escuché por primera vez sobre Communities That Care Gosh, podría decir Mary Christa, pero quiero decir que hace seis o siete años, donde había otras organizaciones y yo no. Realmente no sé mucho al respecto. Es emocionante para mí volver a estar conectado, pero sé cómo operan, realmente disfruté nuestra conexión durante los últimos meses y los temas que cubrimos hoy. Y entonces, ya sabes, creo que cualquier cosa que ayude a Foster y promueva la conexión y, en particular, en particular, todas las cosas que tienen como objetivo conectar y estar ahí para nuestra juventud. Y sabes que ahí es donde, sabes, pero el truco es que dentro de nosotros, si tenemos un trauma sin resolver, todos somos como niños actuando como adultos. Entonces, esto es lo que hace Communities That Care, para llegar a los niños y llegar al niño y a cada uno de nosotros de una manera amorosa y de aceptación de límites, lo que apoyo plenamente.

Jessica Crate  
quiéralo. Bueno, apreciamos que seas parte de esto, eres una parte tan integral de lo que sabes, de nuestra comunidad y de ayudar a las personas a prosperar. Así que estamos muy agradecidos por no solo ir más allá de aquí hoy, sino por todo el trabajo que hacen aquí en Park City y más allá. Y sé que esto afectará a muchas vidas. Entonces ustedes abandonan un poco de amor. Y por último, antes de que te dejemos ir, siempre me gusta preguntar a nuestros entrevistados, ya sabes, ¿qué es lo que dice tu eslogan? ¿mantra? ¿Que es? ¿Qué le gustaría dejar a nuestros espectadores como parte de su legado?

Arch Wright  
Um, hay una cita de Rumi, que desearía poder hacer exactamente. Pero se trata de, ya sabes, no tanto buscar el amor, sino buscar el bloqueo que tenemos que nos impide amarnos a nosotros mismos y a los demás. Así que creo que sí. Creo que la curiosidad, el coraje y la confianza en los lugares correctos son algo que todos tenemos frente a nosotros más de lo que quizás algunos de nosotros tenemos en toda nuestra vida.

Jessica Crate  
Fantástico. Así que en el arte. Muchas gracias por ser parte de esto hoy. Sé que has agregado valor a mi vida y a nuestra comunidad. Así que gracias de nuevo. Y ya saben, para aquellos de ustedes que estén sintonizados, pueden encontrar un enlace a todos nuestros podcasts y blogs de videos en CTC summit county.org. Y nos encantaría tenerlos aquí de nuevo, y ya saben, cualquiera de ustedes que tenga sugerencias, comentarios, envíenos nuestro camino. Tenemos muchos recursos excelentes en nuestro sitio web, así como en nuestro blog. Así que gracias de nuevo, arco por sintonizarnos. Y para aquellos de ustedes que escuchan y comparten esto, agradecemos su apoyo. Así que tengan un día maravilloso y hablaremos con todos ustedes pronto. Adiós por ahora.