Mental Health Mondays with Dr. Daniel Mendoza of the University of Utah

Mar 14, 2021 | CTC Blog

Dr. Daniel Mendoza is our guest speaker and here to share his research on the impacts of pollution and high altitude on our mental health.

 

EDUCATION

Ph.D. in Earth and Atmospheric Sciences

Purdue University

Dissertation Title: Policy applications of a highly resolved spatial and temporal onroad CO2 emissions data product for the U.S.: Analyses and their implications for mitigation

 

M.S. in Physics

Purdue University

 

B.A. in Physics and Computer Science

DePauw University

 

RESEARCH INTERESTS

  • Atmospheric Sciences
  • Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Computer modeling of human exposures to pollutants
  • Carbon Cycle and its effect on climate change
  • Energy policy
  • Highly-resolved air quality observations
  • Urban development modeling
  • Social justice and sustainability education
  • Bayesian framework to model and quantify commuter exposures
  • Black carbon fine particulate matter and carbon monoxide

Jessica Crate
Hello everyone and welcome to mental health Mondays, Communities That Care video podcast discussing mental health. My name is Jessica crate and I’m the visionary spokeswoman for CTC Summit County, and CTC Sonoma County, our vision is truly a world of connection, vitality and well being we’re kids and families thrive. So our mission is to collaboratively improve the lives of youth and families by fostering a culture of health through prevention. So, at CTC, we have a safe saying that connection is prevention. So in the spirit of community and connection, we’re delighted to have Dr. Daniel Mendoza, here with us today. Dr. Daniel, thank you so much for joining us, Dr. Daniel holds joint faculty appointments in the department of city and metropolitan planning, atmospheric sciences, pulmonary medicine and the Nexus Research Institute at the University of Utah documentos. His research interests include quantifying and characterizing urban greenhouse gas and criteria pollutant emissions for use in human exposure, estimation and metropolitan planning. He also examines the health effects associated with acute and chronic pollutant exposure, particularly, particularly in vulnerable populations, which is something we’re going to dive more into today. By combining expertise in the air pollution health outcomes in urban planning, his work aims to produce inequitable scientific and policy solutions to address air quality concerns. So not only are you the director, co director of the dark sky studies, you serve as editor in chief, you’re on the board at University of Utah, and you’ve recently been elevating your career and dove into a whole new aspect, which you call getting dirty as a drone engineer. So we’ll let you dive into more of that. But Dr. Daniel Mendoza, thank you so much for joining us. Today, I’m excited to dive into some of the work that you’re doing, especially as it relates to mental health and what we’ve been dealing with over the last year plus. So tell us a little bit more about yourself, your organization and some of the initiatives that you’re excited about.

 

Dr. Daniel Mendoza
Great, thank you for the invitation. Glad to be here, Jessica. I can start off a little bit by saying why there are all these aspects to my work, but they really all tie in together, the way that I envision the work that I do is really developing equitable and healthy communities for all. And that’s really where all the pieces come from. So my PhD was in atmospheric sciences. So I look really at air quality. And I always like to say that I started out my work was in greenhouse gas emissions, but unfortunately, only 50% of people believe in climate change. But then I realized about 100% of people believe in lung cancer, which is why I started to focus on health. And that’s where I followed a postdoctoral fellowship in public health, which is specific in environmental, occupational health. And then I came here to the University of Utah to refine some of my work in atmospheric sciences. So my work originally was greenhouse gas emissions, as I mentioned, but emissions are one thing and what we call exposure. So what people actually brief is a different thing. For example, a really clear example that I wish more people would understand is that many people complain about the big factories, the big industrial sources, but those stacks are, if there are built according to regulation, there are almost 300 feet high, which means that that pollution gets dispersed, and it’s not as concentrated. Whereas anyone who lives near a freeway is actually really directly breathing that. So we really need to make sure we’re we’re quantifying not just the emissions, but the pollutant concentrations in different locations. And that’s how we can really start looking at health. So that’s why I did some more work here and atmospheric sciences. And then finally, to really get a little bit of far more biological holistic approach in terms of what the effects are on the human body. I capped off my education with three year pulmonary fellowship in the School of Medicine. So that gave me much more insight into really the biological mechanisms, what happens at a deeper level. And so ultimately, while these pieces are combined, and why I work in all these different departments in this different aspects is because ultimately what we want to do is we want to establish and plan communities. And that’s where the appointment in city and Metropolitan Planning comes in. Because ultimately what we want to do is we can start off with some measurements or some observations or even some modeling of what the pollution is, and then we move towards the health impacts. Because then that gives us some have a little bit of an economic angle to this so that way we can say, well, we build a highway here. This is what the potential costs in human health would be. And then we really like to think about what policy avenues and urban development avenues we have that we can leverage. And then we tie that in. And so that’s where the faculty appointments come in.

 

Jessica Crate
Fantastic, I love having the higher level, you know, more of an overview perspective, to see, you know, how are things developed? How are things progressing? And, you know, why do things progress and happen the way they do, and the research behind it is phenomenal. So, you know, after talking to you on the phone for, for lengthy amounts of time and diving into some of the things that you do, talk to us a little bit more about, you know, as you’re working in these different departments, you know, how are you seeing the correlation between mental health, wholeness, you know, how it parlays to communities, etc.

 

Dr. Daniel Mendoza
Yes, so, being able to see things from a holistic point of view, I do miss a little bit of drilling down into the details and the nitty gritty. But I think ultimately, we do need to have a comprehensive vision, I think too many times, we may have a very good specialist in a specific field, but then that exists within a vacuum. And it may not be necessarily something that’s applicable, one of the best lessons that my PhD advisor Dr. Kevin Gurney gave me as I was going through my Ph. D. program was, if you can somehow frame your research into something that can be applied to policy, then it will become relevant, then it will be useful. And that’s why I, for example, whenever I do some of my work, looking at air quality to health impacts, I don’t just say, well, let’s remove all pollution. Because that’s simply impossible, we do have some natural pollution such as wildfires, or any kind of dusters, we can just say we can make this perfect with zero pollution. But what I can look at is, well, there are some sources that could be mitigated. What is economic cost of that, and then what is the health benefits of that. And that’s how I approach this Because ultimately, that’s what we need to do. looking specifically at mental health. What is interesting is that there are a few focus areas of my work that touch on mental health. And as you mentioned earlier, during the introduction, my work is basically split between the air quality side, but then also the light quality side. And both of those touch very directly onto mental health. As we all know, in the Wasatch Front, and also in Park City, we’re at elevation, what elevation basically means is that will never be oxygen saturated. So we’re always going to be just a little bit below oxygen saturation, we know that there are many physical issues, for example, the most obvious ones is athletic performance, athletic performance does decrease. Well, who is to say that and this has been tested, that the rest of our of our bodies, and our minds are not going to be functioning fully at 100%. Now, if we compound that with air pollution, which we unfortunately do experience, now, instead of not only breathing, saying 95%, or 90% of the oxygen, that we wouldn’t be breathing, a lower elevation, maybe 10, or 15% of that oxygen, maybe 10, or 15% of that air is now polluted, is now full of contaminants. And so now what we’re actually breathing in is much less. First of all, as we go up higher in elevation, our body just needs a certain threshold of oxygen to function. That’s, there’s no question on that. So what we see is the ventilatory rate increases. So for example, we were to breathe at a certain rate at sea level. And then we all of a sudden go to say, Everest or some other elevated location, even here, even Park City or, or Salt Lake City, our breathing just naturally goes up a couple more breaths a minute. Therefore, not only are we now breathing more just to keep up, though we may be breathing in more pollution overall. So that is one of the concerns that we have. The other one is light exposure. As we know, unfortunately, due to the covid 19 pandemic, many people are now have been forced to work from home. There’s less human interaction, I can go into that much later. I’m just going to talk to you about the environmental exposure side. And so we’re spending a lot of screen time You and I are right now communicating to a computer. in normal times I might be at an office with you or a studio recording this, but now we’re looking at screens. Unfortunately, many screens do radiate a lot of blue light. Blue Light is something that’s very unnatural to us as human beings. We’ve evolved many millions of years. guiding our sleep patterns are certainly kadian rhythms through the sun’s light. And the problem is that now many people are suffering through having extra. We knew before the pandemic, we knew that people were spending too much time on computers, we knew that people were spending too much time watching TVs. And now with smartphones and tablets, people are just really just having these devices directly in front of their faces. A TV could be across a room, your phone is that your honest life, by definition, so now we’re being bombarded by that. And what that does is it stimulates your your central nervous system. And now it makes it harder for one to fall asleep, I remember my mom, and I’m sure many people’s moms would say, don’t watch TV for too long, you won’t be able to fall asleep, that is actually scientifically proven to be true. And with the added stress of the pandemic, with the added stress of having fewer human social interactions, and then having this light being bombarded as your eyes. Now we’re actually altering that and many people are suffering already, before the pandemic, the World Health Organization have called sleep deprivation as the number one public health crisis. Well, now it’s gotten so much worse. So looking at artificial lights, and, and light exposure is really the other half of my work in terms of human exposure, and looking at, and that ties in directly with mental health.

 

Jessica Crate
Fantastic, well, I love that we’re talking more about, you know, just the exterior, environmental aspects of things that can lead to mental health issues, which, you know, not only are adults at risk of dealing with, you know, light pollution, screen time, and lack of sleep, but youth are now you know, doing online school and you know, more the, the rate of people using technology and having more screentime has, you know, increased dramatically throughout the pandemic. So, you know, let’s dive into some of these action items that people can, can do and really be aware of, in order to help maybe decrease some of the mental side effects that are negatively impacting them and, and really be more aware and conscious of, you know, if you’re a family member, or youth, a parent coach, teacher tuning in here, some you know, things that you can a be aware of the take and put into action on how to protect yourself, how to get better sleep, etc. So let’s talk more about some of these actionable items that that you can share with us documentaries about the things that you’re teaching people not only behind the scenes, but that we can parlay into our communities here.

 

Dr. Daniel Mendoza
Absolutely, I think I mean, one have a really good rule of thumb that we’ve all heard this, try to shut down your devices, half an hour to an hour before you go to sleep. I think that that’s definitely something that will help. For example, my phone, we do have all phones now. And many computers have what’s called a blue light filter, or a night mode, I have that actually permanently on my devices. There’s no need to bombard ourselves with blue light.

 

Jessica Crate
And you can preset that too. Yeah, yes. So in the settings, make sure you are giving yourself you know, that quality amount of time and your phone will go on to night mode, you know, at a certain time in trouble, stay on night mode until a certain time in the morning, which you know, is very beneficial to just decreasing that blue light glare.

 

Dr. Daniel Mendoza
And as I mentioned minus permanently on night mode. That definitely reduces my eyestrain I’ve actually done. I’ve done this experiments, obviously I’m n equals one, I’m just one person, but I’ve done the experiment to where I’m reading the same article, both on night mode or not on night mode, and I can definitely sense the strain. I think that’s definitely something that one can do. And I think we do I have to understand that there are some people who are able to put these things into action some people may not be able to. And that’s part of, I think, where we need to understand that there are some distinct socio economic disparities. One example. And this is a really quick example. But I think it really illustrates the problem and the disparities and inequity that happens in our society. I always like to bring up the example of a person who is who lives on the west side of Salt Lake County, and I just kind of take people through, it’s basically a three minute little discussion. So if you have a person who lives in the west side of Salt Lake County, and they’re coming back from work, usually they have to rush to catch one of the last buses because bus service ends much sooner on the west side than on the east side. And so now they’re taking the bus and they’re coming home from work. The problem is as soon as they cross west of State Street, many of the highways do not have sound barriers. We found that actually through GIS mapping that many of this of these was the interstate in particular I 215 has either lower or no sound barriers. So that’s a huge problem. Because it’s not just a sound barrier. It’s also a pollution barrier. Imagine all the pollution that comes from cars. So now this person is exposed to more sound immediately. As they’re heading towards their home, first of all, the bus stop will probably not drop them off near their homes. There are many locations that are not served for almost half a mile by a bus stop, I and we can see here on the east side, it’s exact opposite here we have, for example, where I live very close to the university, I have six transit options within two blocks of my house. And so there’s that disparity right there. So then now they have to walk. If you’re walking at night, let’s assume they’re walking anywhere between half a mile to a mile from the closest transit stuff to their home. First of all, there is that element of human fear their concern, it’s nighttime, someone might come out this, this could be a problem. But at the same time, the light quality is very different. And that’s one of the examples I always like to give to see what light disparity really means. Go take a walk by the avenues here in Salt Lake City, the lights are very warm, very yellow. But one can go to the west side of the city, and many of the newer LED lights are very blue. So now you’re being bombarded by that. And then now you’re you’re completely, much more awake. Now, we also know that due to air pollution hotspots, and the majority of the industrial sources, and the highways being located on the west side, this person is likely going to be breathing, more polluted air. So they’re walking home, they’re breathing more polluted air, they’re more stressed potentially because of their surroundings, and they have worse light exposure. Once they get home. They may be because again, those communities are in the higher rate of being in a food desert, instead of after having walked in maybe have a little bit of hunger and they want to have a snack. And potentially instead of having an apple or a healthier snack because they live near food desert in my reach for a candy bar, which now has more sugar, and in conjunction with the social demographic issues and disparities, that they may potentially be more stress due to different bills, etc. Then they might actually stay awake longer, and they may actually end it. And research has shown that lower social socio economic groups tend to see anywhere between one to two less hours a night than more affluent people combination of stress, and also potentially having to work multiple jobs, you come out and all of that, and every single day, they’re more at a deficit of sleep. And that combined with all the environmental exposure, places at much higher risk for both physical and mental health as well as emotional health concerns. So that that’s sort of a little bit of a primer into who can actually do things about their situation. So we always need to be aware that there’s something to remember is that may they may have the best intentions, but they really have no choice.

 

Jessica Crate
Absolutely. Well, it’s very good. Thank you for painting the picture of, you know, some different situations. So if you’re tuning in here, and one of those things are many of those things are related to your schedule your lifestyle, I’m taking into consideration some of these things that we’re talking about in order to help you reduce the amount of influence exterior influence that you are having, by choice or not to help you, you know, improve your mental and physical, physical health. So, Dr. Mendoza, that brings me to our next question, which you know, you’re very well connected. And so pretty much in the trenches right now with this, and helping people to not only see circumstantially, where they’re being affected by different issues that can trigger mental health things, but what role do you think community connectedness plays in our mental health? And how is the pandemic affected people’s ability to stay connected from your point of view?

 

Dr. Daniel Mendoza
I think that due to the pandemic has really wreak havoc in many different sectors in many different groups. And I think one of the groups that many people don’t talk about very much in terms of support lately has been changing. But Originally, the pandemic has really and epidemic response is really focused on the elderly and the more vulnerable because people are saying well, which is completely true, they’re more likely to suffer worse outcomes. The problem is, and this is, I would say is definitely a concern for areas like Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County. I don’t know if it applies as much to Park City, but younger people the between say 20 to 35 years old. That group has been affected us significant amount, in the sense that the social connectedness, because these are young professionals, and we see the huge influx of young professionals into the Wasatch Front, particularly Salt Lake and Utah counties for, particularly for the financial and tech work. These people have actually been almost, I wouldn’t say burden, but fingers have been pointed at them for having social gatherings. For there’s been a lot of public shaming there’s been which again, the mandates have been established very well, by the by the respective health departments by the CDC, to not gather to be much more careful. However, one of the things that we need to understand is that people who are older people in on average, let’s just say people who are over 40, have either chosen not to have chosen their living arrangements. For the majority of people, that’s they, they have a family, they have a home, they have a partner, they have potentially children, pets, staff, they have they’ve set up their home. And so ideally, we know that’s not the case, you would want to spend the rest of your time or as much time as possible with your family. Well, you have now that as a backup network, you even though it’s unfortunate, you if you’re stuck at home, you at least have two people you’re surrounded with people you love, maybe your pets or in your in your home, imagine a person that’s transplanted themselves across the country. And a month or two months before the pandemic, they don’t know anybody. Right? That is a very tough situation. And if and if we think about it, these are the people that are lowest risk. For most of this, this people in this age bracket between 20 and 35, they are likely not going to have any problems in terms of health outcomes, very low mortality rate. So that’s something and you does a very healthy state because many people are very active. I’ll touch on that in a second. So unfortunately, I it’s not a very popular opinion. I know, I was criticized earlier on about maybe six to 10 months ago, when I said, Look, I get it, we want to curb this down. But again, this are young people who maybe they’re just fresh out of college, they don’t know anyone. And now you’re telling them be locked down in this apartment that you can’t even go outside to even see your neighborhood. That is a very unrealistic expectation. And I’m not saying it’s they’re justified. But it is a very natural human reaction, everyone else is pretty well established where they are. younger kids are at home with their parents, the parents are around or people who who wish to remain single, who are older, that’s fine. That’s their choice. That’s what they chose to do. So that’s something that that’s a little counter current. Now, in terms of Utah, what we do have, which is really, really great is we have a lot of outdoor recreation opportunities. And that’s, for example, I went to the ski shop the other day, because I wanted to potentially upgrade some of my skis, everything’s been sold out. And mountain bikes, they’ve been sold out, any kind of recreation equipment has been sold out. And that’s because we do have that ability, we have a really beautiful landscape. And we have that opportunity on days, I always like to say that basically from November till March, if you if you do it right, you can ski early in the morning, and in the evening, you can go for a nice run or for a bike right because it doesn’t the climate is not as harsh, we keep the snow in the mountains, which is where we want them so we can recreate. And then Luckily, in the urban areas, you can still you know, go out run around the park. So, but again, I’ll probably keep with this theme of social disparities, not everyone has access to these recreation opportunities. And even more directly one part that I missed when I told the story a little bit ago, is that green space is actually reserved for the wealthy. If we look at if we look at the land use, communities that are making below poverty wage on average or up to 150% of poverty wage, they have roughly half of the green space per square mile than wealthier communities are making three times or more above the poverty wage. So this is this is a huge disparity. So again, to follow the example I am very fortunate that I can that I can just go less than half a mountain I just jog to it, delivery partner. And I have parks around me as nature of the Bonneville trail right next to the university whereas lower income populations they may not have that they may literally be surrounded by concrete jungle they may not have as many parks and then they may not be able to afford the road trip down to Moab or arches or somewhere else. So This is something where we really need to look towards trying to narrow that gap and trying to provide opportunities for all our community members.

 

Jessica Crate
Yeah, I love that I and I, it’s very important to highlight, you know that no circumstance, no one is the same. And everyone is dealing with different issues. And no matter where you’re at where you live, what your work is, you know how long you’ve lived in an area, if you’re transplant or not, you know, everyone is dealing with, you know, trying to adjust the ever changing, fluctuating situation that we’re, we’re forced to be in. So, you know, highlighting these certain things is is very helpful. And not only recognizing that, you know, if there’s a way to help your neighbor, help your neighbor, if there’s way to help yourself, help yourself. So let’s talk more about this too, you know, what can you share with us about the mental and emotional impacts of being in a chronic pandemic. And then let’s talk about what recommendations and action items you can share with our audience, our viewers today about ways to cope and simply thrive, we want people to go home today or right this second and go, Hey, oh, my goodness, a, this is me, or I’m dealing with this, or this is part of my life. And I didn’t realize that this could be affecting my mental health, or my children or our family, etc. So let’s talk about some of those action items.

 

Dr. Daniel Mendoza
I think the first, you mentioned the second idea that I would have had the first one is to recognize that mental health is a concern. I think far too often it is not considered a real condition. Far too often it is swept under the rug. There’s a lot of stigma really associated with mental health. And there’s also a lot of fear. I think that many people are concerned that if they do admit to having mental health concerns, they will think they’re crazy. People think they’re needy, people will think they’re unstable, but it’s it’s very similar to any kind of physical ailment, it is something that can be treated, it is something that hopefully, can go away. Sometimes there is chronic issues, but it’s similar to someone who has chronic back pain, you may also have some chronic issues that you may need to see a therapist for a longer period of time or friends or support network, but it shouldn’t be stigmatized. Then the second one, you hit on really well. And I like how you said help your neighbor, help yourself. Because helping someone does provide and it’s a very selfish way to look at it. But it does provide a sense of accomplishment, and it provides a sense of empowerment. I think that too many people feel completely helpless and say I can’t do anything about it. And I and I’ll go for a second on the direction of air quality. Too many people think Well, there’s a huge problem, I can’t do anything about it. But if you tell them, hey, maybe don’t idle your car, or, you know, maybe when try to see if you can I see so many people who for example, use their their lawn mowers, or blowers that are the you know, they’re powered by fossil fuels, and then they have their kid outside, you know, keeping the company that’s blowing directly into their child’s face, you know, small behavioral changes, empowers people and allows them to become more powerful and be able to take on larger changes. Very similar to helping other people. If you if you see that, for example, you just shoveled your neighbor’s sidewalk, an elderly neighbor, it doesn’t have to be elderly, just to be someone and you just do a nice, a nice action, then you feel like okay, I did something with my day. What else can I do next. But if you’re just sitting there feeling really depressed, and you can’t do anything about anything, unfortunately, we all have some sort of power within us to do something, even if it’s small, even if it’s just calling an old friend that you know, maybe struggling, right, or just getting people together through zoom or whatnot. I think that that actually taking one tiny step is better. And this is an Eleanor Roosevelt quote, which you’re probably already familiar with, it’s better to light one candle than Curse of darkness. So I think just taking this and this is much more important in terms of just the mental health aspect, because it removes that feeling of powerlessness, which is what we all feel. We can’t do anything about about epidemic. I mean, we try, but it’s a much larger problem, but we can chip away at it. So I think it’s definitely understanding and there’s so many opportunities and so many of us are in such a fortunate position that we don’t even recognize that we just it makes it it makes it a lot easier for us to feel sorry for our position or what we’re doing right now. But there are many people who have way worse. There are many people who have been forced to be frontline workers. There are many people who are stocking our supermarkets, we may, you know, put our mask on run in and get our our groceries really fast. Go through the checkout lane as fast as possible. And then when we take our mask off and say okay, that’s great. I only took 20 minutes to get on. My groceries for the week. But there’s someone there who has been there eight hours, 10 hours, sometimes it may have to do a double shift. So how can we see opportunities for us to help others. And that’s something that that is actually really important. There are many volunteer groups and to, to go back to the previous topic about green space and having some sort of exposure to, to nature. Many studies. And this is again, pre pandemic, many sites have been done on inner city, particularly kids, inner city, kids who had never, for example, been able to see a milky way because of light pollution, who have never had any kind of adventure or experience, like we take this for granted in Utah. And then they get taken on a summer camp or a summer trip. And they get to see, for example, like I said, the stars The Milky Way, or they get to whitewater raft, or they get to mountain bike. And what that does is it brings a sense of hope it brings a sense of Okay, I can now study more, I can try to go to college, and I can try to have the life or maybe every month or every year, I can go do this and take my family to it, because now My eyes have been open to this. And the other part is really the connection to nature, dark skies, to me is very important. Because being able to see the stars and able to see a milky way and seeing how small we are, regardless of how small we are, we’re still part of the fabric, we’re all made of stardust, essentially. So being able to see this connection, finding your place in the universe, that’s something that many people really struggle with. Many people say, have, and they may not be able to vocalize it. But one can tell that they don’t have a sense of belonging. Where am I? here in the US people on average, and this was a statistic, a little bit of an older statistics, people move on average, seven times during their lifetime. And I’m sure that number has increased a lot since then I think there’s a statistic from the 90s. So where are you from? It’s always a question that kind of gets people to say things such as, Oh, I was last in this other place, or I was born here, but I was raised there. And people actually lose a sort of sense of where they belong. And obviously, your place in the universe is the ultimate address for you, I suppose. So being able to connect that way, I think does establish you many people, for example. And we even know this from a formal introduction from someone of Native American heritage, explains where they’re where their fathers from, where their mothers from, what place their tribe belongs to. And that really establishes these community members, and they don’t really wonder where they’re from, they will tell you exactly where they’re from. And that’s why they don’t have this problem that other people may have. So that’s something that we really need to consider is really understanding who we are and where we’re from, which obviously, is the ultimate question.

 

Jessica Crate
I love that I love the higher level of thinking too, and a lot of self reflection that you discuss self care, Self realization, actualization, and a lot of those key things and factors that you know us as human beings, just to recognize a you are unique, your human being, you have purpose, you have hope. And that, you know, in order if you ever feel stuck, I know this is bad. my saving grace too is, you know, whenever you feel stuck or frustrated, or woe is me, go out and help someone else. send a note, send a text, hop on the phone, do something for someone else that you can’t expect to paint repayment for, do something for someone else, and it will benefit you 1000 fold just like you were saying document doses. So love those things. I hope you guys are taking notes. Feel free to stop this, rewind it, play this again, so many great nuggets in here. Now, one of my favorite favorite questions, too is Dr. Daniel Mendoza is you know, if you could wave your magic wand, we love this question. What would you create or like to see in our communities, especially during, you know, pandemic and as we’re hopefully shifting out of it into something greater?

 

Dr. Daniel Mendoza
Yeah, that’s a that’s a really good question. And I think that there, there are a few things that I think are are important, but I think if I’m going to stress more, what you just said, as we’re coming out of it, is to look back and many people once they get out of a sticky situation, they may not be taking as much stock as to what went well, and what to avoid in the future. I think that as much as we may, you know, be upset about a year loss, and that’s an expression that many people have said, I think what we can understand what we should take away is what will positive about the whole experience, it’s very easy. And I like your expression will be me, I really I, too many people use that and do many people live that. But I think what we need to think about is what went well. And what was positive about the experience, because if every day, we’re just salad with, oh, it’s another day after my mask, or I can see my friends or whatnot, it’s very easy to fall that a spiral of depression. But think about all one positive. And I mean, I can give you a few examples. In my case, and this is extremely selfish, I was able to really isolate and really work on a lot of my research, because I didn’t have additional distractions, I was able to just sit at home, and then just have that time. And then if very differently from when one is in an office, or whatnot, and you have people wandering in, or just random meetings that are impromptu meetings, I simply just switch off the internet, and just work on my work and you cannot reach me, it’s physically impossible. So I know a few other colleagues have also taken that approach. And they were very fortunate they, they were able to do their work, and they’ve advanced for many people is discovering or rediscovering the outdoors. For many people being able to have this flexibility. For some people, they’ve had flexibility, and they were able to now. Well, unfortunately, if you’ve missed some vacation time, maybe you save some money, and now you’ve been able to do now buy, you know, a new set of skis or a bike or something along those lines. So now this is the perspective of people who are better off people who are less well off, well, maybe they have learned about community resources, maybe some other some other organizations have helped them go through this stuff times. I know that unfortunately, many people have lost loved ones. That’s something that we cannot stress enough, this has been very tough, especially because it has taken almost entire families away. And that’s something that we can never really put a value on. There’s obviously nothing positive. But for many people, the additional time with family and our lives, we’ve been really busy. I mean, we are basically overclocked constantly here in the US. We want to have another meeting and another meeting and do something else. And it’s just the it’s it’s it’s this treadmill that is that it’s again a huge cause of mental illness because now we’re thinking, Oh, well, the other person stayed an extra hour or the other person is answering emails at 10 at night, why am I not doing that? Am I going to not, you know, be retained, am I not going to get that race, I know that this other person is doing this or that or the other. So that’s a general stressor. But for example, you know, I’m not a parent, so I can’t really speak to that. But many parents have missed important milestones in their kid’s life. So I think being able to be home now, I know that it makes it very difficult to work. And I know there’s a disproportionate impact on women. We know that on average, women have lost at least in academia used to read those reports. Men have lost about 500 hours of work, whereas women have lost about 750 to 800 hours on average. And again, it’s the disproportionate amount that society have the the emphasis on women racing kids in society in our current society. So we do have to be very cognizant of that. We can just say, Oh, look, you spent all the time with your kids, because it can have it’s a double edged sword, right, you get to see them more. But now you have to pay a lot more attention to them. But ultimately, it happened. And you must just, I think you just have to accept that. Well, it was great. Yes, my work didn’t go as well as possible. But at least I was able to see my kid learning how to walk or talk or what not. So we need to be grateful for the positive that has happened. But then also be cognizant of what went wrong and not be afraid to discuss that, particularly with, with our local stakeholders and elected officials, we need to understand, look, you know, it was probably a mistake to reopen this, you know, or to, for example, reduce a mask mandate, or do this or that or the other and really understand this and be cognizant, and then work with other like minded people, and speak up. Because this pandemics are not going away, we’re going to we’re likely going to have them every five to 10 years. And so we now need to be much more prepared. Part of the reason why this spread so quickly was because of the increase in international travel every one flies, flying has become one of the fastest ways and that’s how it spread from China to the rest of the world very, very quickly. And governments were not able to react quickly enough, which is what led to all these problems. So we really need to think about so. The magic wand would be one be grateful recognize a positive view To see the positive and what happened, be grateful for that be appreciative of that. Because ultimately, that’s all that’s all you got, you don’t get to rewind, even if you’re really upset about what happened, you can rewind, and we’ve all spend way too much time in the negative, think about the positive, be grateful for that. But then remember, what went well, what went wrong and be more prepared for next time. 

 

Jessica Crate
Love that, you know, gratitude shifts everything. And, you know, if you’re sitting here today, maybe make a mental note or jot down on a journal, maybe on a whiteboard, you know, what lesson did you learn, maybe share this with your family, your kids, whoever your your your circle is, you know, ask some folks share some ideas, you know, what did you learn from the pandemic? What is something you taught someone else? And, you know, how can we pay this forward and be better prepared in the future, as well as preparing the future generation. So, you know, I always say, flip the switch, flip the switch in your, your mindset in your life, you know, if you’re your woe is me, or wherever you’re at, flip that switch to the positive, take a moment of gratitude, we can all find something to be grateful for, and each and every moment, no matter what our circumstances. So, Dr. Daniel Mendoza, just love some of these nuggets, and, and just your higher level of thinking the research side, and just how it’s also interconnected, it really is a synergistic effective, you know, us as a human as a whole, as we walk through this life, things to be aware of things to move forward with, we can all live our best life. So last but not least, you know, you are very involved in many communities. How is being a part of Communities That Care and, and working with us knowing about our organization, how has that helped you in your work?

 

Dr. Daniel Mendoza
I think that having an organization like Communities That Care, that is not, for example, formerly associated with with a government agency, and it’s able to really bring like minded individuals who may otherwise be intimidated by, let’s say, a formal position in a stakeholder group, I think that there are many people who really want to help who have the Energy Lab expertise, who have the desire to help and bring ideas together to a like minded group. I think that that really adds significant value. Because then, for example, with a podcast that you are creating, you’re able to educate and inform and empower other people and bring their ideas forward without, for example, having taking a formal role, for example, in a community council, or even as an elected official, that may be something that people may not want to necessarily dedicate a significant amount of time to, because they just cannot, or they do not want to, but everyone has some piece of knowledge that could be useful for the community at large everyone, either through formal training, or through just life experiences has something that we can share. And that’s, I think, part of really empowering people. And, and really asking, because, again, that’s that’s part of the mental health aspect is, don’t think that you’re insignificant, your life is unique. And there is at least one thing that you can bring forth that can help the community grow and develop and become better. So I think that being able to really look at that being able to invite people to share that. I think that that’s a really great role for communities of care.

 

Jessica Crate
I agree 110,000%. And it’s so great to have you part of this village, this tribe, this community, of the people that we’re pulling together, because it does take a lot of individuals that are collectively moving forward and wanting to help further, not just the human race, but people in general and to help provide awareness and education. So very excited to have you on here. And before we let you go, I’d love you to leave our viewers just what is your quote, your mantra, Dr. Mendoza that you live by that you’d like to share with our viewers or maybe a tip of the day that you can leave us with?

 

Dr. Daniel Mendoza
Hmm, that was not part of the questions. I got a little a little surprise now. But I think something that I’ve always and this really goes in the spirit of, you’ll regret more what you didn’t do than what you did. And for that, I would say if I were to summarize it in a quote is, you don’t get a do over in life. When I think just follow what you want to do. And just follow your passion. Don’t let things get in the way I know. And what I saw that really impressed me was in my graduating class, when I got my PhD there was a student who also got Got her PhD. She had many setbacks in life, had a family, and then had all sorts of issues that happened and she finally was able to graduate with her PhD at age 91.

 

Jessica Crate
Wow, that’s amazing. You’re never too old and you’re never and too young isn’t a thing. So love that no regrets live life with no regrets. You have one shot at this beautiful thing called life. So, so many great nuggets of inspiration, wisdom, education. Just so many great things here. So delicious. So thank you so much, Dr. Mendoza, for tuning in with us today on our mental health Mondays in a video podcast with CTC that we do each and every week, so feel free to share this out, tune in on behalf of our executive director, Mary Krista Smith and myself. Thank you for tuning in and sharing this out. And you can find a link to all of our video podcasts. I’m at CTC summit county.org. drop a link below. Find out more about what Daniel Mendoza does a lot more about his work ways to connect. And I will see you again on our next mental health Monday. So thanks again for tuning in document doza. Thank you so much for your time. And we’ll talk to you all again soon. Bye for now.

“Utilizamos un servicio automatizado para esta traducción. Somos conscientes de que puede haber errores y agradecemos su comprensión”.

Jessica Crate
Hola a todos y bienvenidos a los lunes sobre salud mental, podcast de video de Communities That Care sobre salud mental. Mi nombre es Jessica Crate y soy la vocera visionaria de CTC Summit County y CTC Sonoma County, nuestra visión es verdaderamente un mundo de conexión, vitalidad y bienestar en el que los niños y las familias prosperan. Por eso, nuestra misión es mejorar de forma colaborativa la vida de los jóvenes y las familias fomentando una cultura de la salud a través de la prevención. Entonces, en CTC, tenemos un dicho seguro de que la conexión es prevención. Así que en el espíritu de comunidad y conexión, estamos encantados de tener al Dr. Daniel Mendoza aquí con nosotros hoy. Dr. Daniel, muchas gracias por acompañarnos, el Dr. Daniel tiene cargos docentes conjuntos en el departamento de planificación urbana y metropolitana, ciencias atmosféricas, medicina pulmonar y el Instituto de Investigación Nexus de documentos de la Universidad de Utah. Sus intereses de investigación incluyen la cuantificación y caracterización de gases de efecto invernadero urbanos y emisiones de contaminantes de criterio para su uso en la exposición humana, la estimación y la planificación metropolitana. También examina los efectos en la salud asociados con la exposición aguda y crónica a contaminantes, particularmente, particularmente en poblaciones vulnerables, que es algo en lo que vamos a profundizar hoy. Al combinar la experiencia en los resultados de salud de la contaminación del aire en la planificación urbana, su trabajo tiene como objetivo producir soluciones científicas y políticas inequitativas para abordar las preocupaciones sobre la calidad del aire. Así que no solo eres el director, codirector de los estudios del cielo oscuro, sino que también eres editor en jefe, estás en la junta de la Universidad de Utah y recientemente has estado elevando tu carrera y te sumerges en un aspecto completamente nuevo. , a lo que llamas ensuciarte como ingeniero de drones. Así que te dejaremos sumergirte en más de eso. Pero Dr. Daniel Mendoza, muchas gracias por acompañarnos. Hoy, estoy emocionado de sumergirme en parte del trabajo que está haciendo, especialmente en lo que se refiere a la salud mental y a lo que hemos estado lidiando durante el último año. Cuéntenos un poco más sobre usted, su organización y algunas de las iniciativas que le entusiasman.

 

Dr. Daniel Mendoza  

Genial, gracias por la invitación. Me alegro de estar aquí, Jessica. Puedo comenzar un poco diciendo por qué hay todos estos aspectos en mi trabajo, pero realmente todos se relacionan, la forma en que visualizo el trabajo que hago es realmente desarrollar comunidades equitativas y saludables para todos. Y de ahí es realmente de donde vienen todas las piezas. Entonces mi doctorado fue en ciencias atmosféricas. Así que realmente miro la calidad del aire. Y siempre me gusta decir que comencé mi trabajo en las emisiones de gases de efecto invernadero, pero desafortunadamente, solo el 50% de la gente cree en el cambio climático. Pero luego me di cuenta de que aproximadamente el 100% de la gente cree en el cáncer de pulmón, por eso comencé a centrarme en la salud. Y ahí fue donde hice una beca postdoctoral en salud pública, que es específica en salud ambiental y ocupacional. Y luego vine aquí a la Universidad de Utah para refinar parte de mi trabajo en ciencias atmosféricas. Entonces, mi trabajo originalmente consistía en emisiones de gases de efecto invernadero, como mencioné, pero las emisiones son una cosa y lo que llamamos exposición. Entonces, lo que la gente realmente resume es una cosa diferente. Por ejemplo, un ejemplo realmente claro que me gustaría que más gente entendiera es que mucha gente se queja de las grandes fábricas, de las grandes fuentes industriales, pero esas chimeneas son, si se construyen de acuerdo con la normativa, hay casi 300 pies de altura, que significa que la contaminación se dispersa y no está tan concentrada. Mientras que cualquiera que viva cerca de una autopista está realmente respirando eso directamente. Así que realmente debemos asegurarnos de que estamos cuantificando no solo las emisiones, sino también las concentraciones de contaminantes en diferentes lugares. Y así es como realmente podemos empezar a mirar la salud. Por eso hice un poco más de trabajo aquí y en ciencias atmosféricas. Y finalmente, para obtener un enfoque holístico mucho más biológico en términos de los efectos en el cuerpo humano. Terminé mi educación con una beca pulmonar de tres años en la Facultad de Medicina. Así que eso me dio mucha más información sobre los mecanismos biológicos, lo que sucede a un nivel más profundo. Y entonces, en última instancia, si bien estas piezas se combinan, y la razón por la que trabajo en todos estos departamentos diferentes en estos aspectos diferentes es porque, en última instancia, lo que queremos hacer es establecer y planificar comunidades. Y ahí es donde entra la cita en Urbanismo y Planificación Metropolitana. Porque en última instancia, lo que queremos hacer es comenzar con algunas mediciones o algunas observaciones o incluso algún modelo de lo que es la contaminación, y luego avanzar hacia los impactos en la salud. Porque eso nos da que algunos tengan un pequeño ángulo económico en esto, así que de esa manera podemos decir, bueno, construimos una carretera aquí. Estos son los posibles costos en salud humana. Y luego realmente nos gusta pensar en qué vías de política y vías de desarrollo urbano tenemos que podemos aprovechar. Y luego vinculamos eso. Y ahí es donde entran los nombramientos de profesores.

 

Jessica Crate
Fantástico, me encanta tener el nivel superior, ya sabes, más una perspectiva general, para ver, ya sabes, ¿cómo se desarrollan las cosas? ¿Cómo van las cosas? Y, ya sabes, por qué las cosas progresan y suceden de la manera en que lo hacen, y la investigación detrás de esto es fenomenal. Entonces, ya sabes, después de hablar contigo por teléfono durante mucho tiempo y sumergirte en algunas de las cosas que haces, háblanos un poco más sobre, ya sabes, ya que estás trabajando en estos diferentes departamentos, ya sabes, cómo ves la correlación entre salud mental, integridad, ya sabes, cómo se relaciona con las comunidades, etc.

 

Dr. Daniel Mendoza
Sí, entonces, al poder ver las cosas desde un punto de vista holístico, echo de menos profundizar un poco en los detalles y el meollo de la cuestión. Pero creo que, en última instancia, necesitamos tener una visión integral, creo que muchas veces, podemos tener un muy buen especialista en un campo específico, pero eso existe dentro de un vacío. Y puede que no sea necesariamente algo que sea aplicable, una de las mejores lecciones que me dio mi asesor de doctorado, el Dr. Kevin Gurney, mientras cursaba mi programa de doctorado fue, si de alguna manera puede enmarcar su investigación en algo que pueda ser aplicado a la política, entonces será relevante, luego será útil. Y es por eso que yo, por ejemplo, cada vez que hago algo de mi trabajo, analizando la calidad del aire y los impactos en la salud, no solo digo, bueno, eliminemos toda la contaminación. Debido a que eso es simplemente imposible, tenemos algo de contaminación natural, como incendios forestales o cualquier tipo de plumeros, podemos decir que podemos hacer esto perfecto con cero contaminación. Pero lo que puedo ver es, bueno, hay algunas fuentes que podrían mitigarse. ¿Cuál es el costo económico de eso, y luego cuáles son los beneficios para la salud de eso? Y así es como me acerco a esto porque, en última instancia, eso es lo que tenemos que hacer. mirando específicamente a la salud mental. Lo interesante es que hay algunas áreas de enfoque de mi trabajo que tocan la salud mental. Y como mencionaste anteriormente, durante la introducción, mi trabajo se divide básicamente entre el lado de la calidad del aire, pero también el lado de la calidad de la luz. Y ambos afectan muy directamente a la salud mental. Como todos sabemos, en Wasatch Front, y también en Park City, estamos en elevación, lo que básicamente significa elevación es que nunca estará saturado de oxígeno. Así que siempre estaremos un poco por debajo de la saturación de oxígeno, sabemos que hay muchos problemas físicos, por ejemplo, el más obvio es el rendimiento deportivo, el rendimiento deportivo sí disminuye. Bueno, quién puede decir eso y esto ha sido probado, que el resto de nuestros cuerpos y nuestras mentes no van a funcionar completamente al 100%. Ahora, si combinamos eso con la contaminación del aire, que desafortunadamente experimentamos, ahora, en lugar de no solo respirar, decir 95% o 90% del oxígeno, no estaríamos respirando, una elevación más baja, tal vez 10, o el 15% de ese oxígeno, tal vez el 10, o el 15% de ese aire ahora está contaminado, ahora está lleno de contaminantes. Y ahora lo que realmente estamos respirando es mucho menos. En primer lugar, a medida que subimos en elevación, nuestro cuerpo solo necesita un cierto umbral de oxígeno para funcionar. Eso es, no hay duda sobre eso. Entonces, lo que vemos es que aumenta la frecuencia respiratoria. Entonces, por ejemplo, debíamos respirar a un cierto ritmo al nivel del mar. Y luego, de repente, vamos a decir, Everest o algún otro lugar elevado, incluso aquí, incluso en Park City o Salt Lake City, nuestra respiración aumenta naturalmente un par de respiraciones más por minuto. Por lo tanto, ahora no solo estamos respirando más solo para mantener el ritmo, aunque es posible que estemos respirando más contaminación en general. Entonces esa es una de las preocupaciones que tenemos. El otro es la exposición a la luz. Como sabemos, desafortunadamente, debido a la pandemia de covid 19, muchas personas ahora se han visto obligadas a trabajar desde casa. Hay menos interacción humana, puedo profundizar en eso mucho más tarde. Solo les voy a hablar sobre el lado de la exposición ambiental. Así que pasamos mucho tiempo frente a la pantalla. Tú y yo nos estamos comunicando ahora mismo con una computadora. en tiempos normales, podría estar en una oficina contigo o en un estudio grabando esto, pero ahora estamos mirando pantallas. Desafortunadamente, muchas pantallas irradian mucha luz azul. La luz azul es algo que no es natural para nosotros como seres humanos. Hemos evolucionado muchos millones de años. que guían nuestros patrones de sueño son ciertamente ritmos kadianos a través de la luz del sol. Y el problema es que ahora mucha gente está sufriendo por tener más. Sabíamos antes de la pandemia, sabíamos que la gente pasaba demasiado tiempo en las computadoras, sabíamos que la gente pasaba demasiado tiempo viendo la televisión. Y ahora, con los teléfonos inteligentes y las tabletas, la gente realmente solo tiene estos dispositivos directamente frente a sus caras. Un televisor podría estar al otro lado de una habitación, su teléfono es su vida honesta, por definición, así que ahora estamos siendo bombardeados por esa. Y lo que hace es estimular su sistema nervioso central. Y ahora es más difícil que uno se duerma, recuerdo a mi mamá, y estoy seguro de que las mamás de muchas personas dirían, no mires televisión por mucho tiempo, no podrás dormirte, eso es en realidad científicamente probado que es cierto. Y con el estrés adicional de la pandemia, con el estrés adicional de tener menos interacciones sociales humanas, y luego tener esta luz bombardeada como sus ojos. Ahora estamos alterando eso y muchas personas ya están sufriendo, antes de la pandemia, la Organización Mundial de la Salud ha llamado a la privación del sueño como la principal crisis de salud pública. Bueno, ahora ha empeorado mucho. Entonces, mirar las luces artificiales y la exposición a la luz es realmente la otra mitad de mi trabajo en términos de exposición humana y mirar, y eso se relaciona directamente con la salud mental.

 

Jessica Crate
Fantástico, bueno, me encanta que estemos hablando más, ya sabes, solo de los aspectos externos y ambientales de las cosas que pueden conducir a problemas de salud mental, que, ya sabes, no solo los adultos corren el riesgo de lidiar, ya sabes. , la contaminación lumínica, el tiempo frente a la pantalla y la falta de sueño, pero los jóvenes ahora, ya saben, están en la escuela en línea y, además, la tasa de personas que usan la tecnología y tienen más tiempo frente a la pantalla ha aumentado drásticamente durante la pandemia. Entonces, ya sabes, profundicemos en algunos de estos elementos de acción que las personas pueden, pueden hacer y de los que realmente son conscientes, para ayudar tal vez a disminuir algunos de los efectos secundarios mentales que los están impactando negativamente y, y realmente, ser más conscientes y consciente de, ya sabes, si eres un miembro de la familia, o un joven, un entrenador de padres, un maestro sintonizando aquí, algunos ya sabes, cosas que puedes tomar y poner en práctica sobre cómo protegerte, cómo dormir mejor, etc. Así que hablemos más sobre algunos de estos elementos procesables que puede compartir con nosotros documentales sobre las cosas que le está enseñando a la gente no solo detrás de escena, sino que podemos aprovechar nuestras comunidades aquí. .

 

 

Dr. Daniel Mendoza
Absolutamente, creo que quiero decir, uno tiene una regla general muy buena de que todos hemos escuchado esto, trate de apagar sus dispositivos, de media hora a una hora antes de irse a dormir. Creo que definitivamente es algo que ayudará. Por ejemplo, mi teléfono, ahora tenemos todos los teléfonos. Y muchas computadoras tienen lo que se llama un filtro de luz azul, o un modo nocturno, lo tengo de forma permanente en mis dispositivos. No hay necesidad de bombardearnos con luz azul.

 

Jessica Crate
Y también puedes preajustar eso. Si sí. Entonces, en la configuración, asegúrese de darse a sí mismo, esa cantidad de tiempo de calidad y su teléfono pasará al modo nocturno, ya sabe, en un momento determinado en problemas, permanecerá en modo nocturno hasta un momento determinado de la mañana. , que ya sabes, es muy beneficioso simplemente para disminuir el resplandor de la luz azul.

 

Dr. Daniel Mendoza
Y como mencioné menos permanentemente en modo nocturno. Eso definitivamente reduce la fatiga visual que he hecho. Hice estos experimentos, obviamente soy n igual a uno, solo soy una persona, pero hice el experimento en el que estoy leyendo el mismo artículo, tanto en modo nocturno como en modo nocturno, y Definitivamente puedo sentir la tensión. Creo que definitivamente es algo que uno puede hacer. Y creo que sí. Tengo que entender que hay algunas personas que son capaces de poner estas cosas en acción, otras quizás no. Y eso es parte de, creo, donde debemos entender que hay algunas disparidades socioeconómicas distintas. Un ejemplo. Y este es un ejemplo realmente rápido. Pero creo que realmente ilustra el problema y las disparidades e inequidades que ocurren en nuestra sociedad. Siempre me gusta traer a colación el ejemplo de una persona que vive en el lado oeste del condado de Salt Lake, y simplemente le cuento a la gente, es básicamente una pequeña discusión de tres minutos. Entonces, si tiene una persona que vive en el lado oeste del condado de Salt Lake y regresa del trabajo, generalmente tiene que apresurarse para tomar uno de los últimos autobuses porque el servicio de autobús termina mucho antes en el lado oeste que en el lado este. Y ahora toman el autobús y regresan a casa del trabajo. El problema es que tan pronto como cruzan al oeste de State Street, muchas de las carreteras no tienen barreras de sonido. Descubrimos que, en realidad, a través del mapeo GIS, muchos de estos eran la interestatal, en particular, la I 215 tiene barreras de sonido más bajas o nulas. Entonces ese es un gran problema. Porque no es solo una barrera de sonido. También es una barrera contra la contaminación. Imagínese toda la contaminación que proviene de los automóviles. Así que ahora esta persona está expuesta a más sonido de inmediato. Mientras se dirigen hacia su casa, en primer lugar, la parada de autobús probablemente no los dejará cerca de sus casas. Hay muchos lugares que no cuentan con servicio de casi media milla por una parada de autobús, yo y nosotros podemos ver aquí en el lado este, es exactamente lo opuesto aquí tenemos, por ejemplo, donde vivo v uando está cerca de la universidad, tengo seis opciones de tránsito a dos cuadras de mi casa. Y ahí está esa disparidad. Entonces ahora tienen que caminar. Si caminas de noche, supongamos que caminan entre media milla y una milla desde el transporte público más cercano a su casa. En primer lugar, está ese elemento del miedo humano que les preocupa, es de noche, alguien podría salir así, esto podría ser un problema. Pero al mismo tiempo, la calidad de la luz es muy diferente. Y ese es uno de los ejemplos que siempre me gusta dar para ver qué significa realmente la disparidad de luz. Ve a caminar por las avenidas aquí en Salt Lake City, las luces son muy cálidas, muy amarillas. Pero uno puede ir al lado oeste de la ciudad, y muchas de las luces LED más nuevas son muy azules. Así que ahora estás siendo bombardeado por eso. Y ahora estás completamente, mucho más despierto. Ahora, también sabemos que debido a los puntos críticos de contaminación del aire, y la mayoría de las fuentes industriales, y las carreteras están ubicadas en el lado oeste, es probable que esta persona esté respirando aire más contaminado. Así que caminan a casa, respiran más aire contaminado, están más estresados ​​potencialmente debido a su entorno y tienen una peor exposición a la luz. Una vez que lleguen a casa. Puede ser porque, nuevamente, esas comunidades están en la tasa más alta de estar en un desierto de comida, en lugar de después de haber entrado tal vez tengan un poco de hambre y quieran tomar un refrigerio. Y potencialmente, en lugar de tener una manzana o un bocadillo más saludable porque viven cerca del desierto de comida, a mi alcance una barra de chocolate, que ahora tiene más azúcar, y junto con los problemas y disparidades sociodemográficas, que potencialmente pueden ser más estrés debido a diferentes facturas, etc. Entonces, en realidad, pueden permanecer despiertos más tiempo y, de hecho, pueden terminarlo. Y la investigación ha demostrado que los grupos socioeconómicos más bajos tienden a ver entre una y dos horas menos por noche que las personas más ricas una combinación de estrés, y también potencialmente tener que trabajar en varios trabajos, usted sale y todo eso, y cada uno de ellos. día, tienen más un déficit de sueño. Y eso, combinado con toda la exposición ambiental, los coloca en un riesgo mucho mayor para la salud física y mental, así como para los problemas de salud emocional. Eso es una especie de introducción a quién realmente puede hacer cosas sobre su situación. Por lo tanto, siempre debemos ser conscientes de que hay algo que recordar y es que pueden tener las mejores intenciones, pero realmente no tienen otra opción.

 

Jessica Crate
Absolutamente. Bueno, es muy bueno. Gracias por pintar la imagen de, ya sabes, algunas situaciones diferentes. Entonces, si está sintonizando aquí, y una de esas cosas es que muchas de esas cosas están relacionadas con su horario, su estilo de vida, estoy tomando en consideración algunas de estas cosas de las que estamos hablando para ayudarlo a reducir el cantidad de influencia influencia exterior que estás teniendo, por elección o no, para ayudarte, ya sabes, a mejorar tu salud física y mental. Entonces, Dr. Mendoza, eso me lleva a nuestra siguiente pregunta, que sabe, está muy bien conectada. Y mucho más en las trincheras en este momento con esto, y ayudando a las personas a ver no solo de manera circunstancial, dónde se ven afectados por diferentes problemas que pueden desencadenar problemas de salud mental, sino qué papel crees que juega la conexión comunitaria en nuestra salud mental. ? ¿Y cómo ha afectado la pandemia la capacidad de las personas para mantenerse conectadas desde su punto de vista?

 

Dr. Daniel Mendoza
Creo que debido a la pandemia realmente ha causado estragos en muchos sectores diferentes en muchos grupos diferentes. Y creo que uno de los grupos de los que mucha gente no habla mucho en términos de apoyo últimamente ha estado cambiando. Pero originalmente, la pandemia realmente ha sucedido y la respuesta a la epidemia está realmente enfocada en los ancianos y los más vulnerables porque la gente dice bien, lo cual es completamente cierto, es más probable que sufran peores resultados. El problema es, y esto es, yo diría que definitivamente es una preocupación para áreas como Salt Lake City, el condado de Salt Lake. No sé si se aplica tanto a Park City, pero las personas más jóvenes, entre los 20 y los 35 años, dicen. Ese grupo nos ha afectado de manera significativa, en el sentido de que la conexión social, porque se trata de jóvenes profesionales, y vemos la enorme afluencia de jóvenes profesionales al Wasatch Front, en particular a los condados de Salt Lake y Utah, en particular para el sector financiero y trabajo tecnológico. Estas personas en realidad han sido casi, no diría una carga, pero se les ha señalado con el dedo por tener reuniones sociales. Porque ha habido mucha vergüenza pública ha habido que, de nuevo, los mandatos han sido establecidos muy bien, por los respectivos departamentos de salud por los CDC, de no reunirse para ser mucho más cuidadosos. Sin embargo, una de las cosas que debemos entender es que las personas que son personas mayores en promedio, digamos que las personas mayores de 40, tienen either eligió no haber elegido sus arreglos de vivienda. Para la mayoría de las personas, eso es ellos, tienen una familia, tienen un hogar, tienen una pareja, tienen potencialmente hijos, mascotas, personal, han establecido su hogar. Entonces, idealmente, sabemos que ese no es el caso, le gustaría pasar el resto de su tiempo o tanto tiempo como sea posible con su familia. Bueno, ahora tienes que como red de respaldo, aunque es una lástima, si estás atrapado en casa, al menos tienes dos personas, estás rodeado de personas que amas, tal vez tus mascotas o en tu casa. , imagine una persona que se trasplanta a sí misma en todo el país. Y un mes o dos meses antes de la pandemia, no conocen a nadie. ¿Correcto? Esa es una situación muy difícil. Y si lo pensamos bien, estas son las personas que corren el menor riesgo. Para la mayor parte de esto, estas personas en este grupo de edad entre 20 y 35, es probable que no tengan ningún problema en términos de resultados de salud, una tasa de mortalidad muy baja. Entonces eso es algo y te hace un estado muy saludable porque muchas personas son muy activas. Tocaré eso en un segundo. Desafortunadamente, no es una opinión muy popular. Lo sé, fui criticado anteriormente hace unos seis o diez meses, cuando dije: Mira, lo entiendo, queremos frenar esto. Pero de nuevo, estos son jóvenes que tal vez acaban de salir de la universidad, no conocen a nadie. Y ahora les está diciendo que estén encerrados en este apartamento que ni siquiera pueden salir a ver su vecindario. Esa es una expectativa muy poco realista. Y no digo que estén justificados. Pero es una reacción humana muy natural, todos los demás están bastante bien establecidos donde están. los niños más pequeños están en casa con sus padres, los padres están cerca o las personas que desean permanecer solteras, que son mayores, está bien. Esa es su elección. Eso es lo que eligieron hacer. Entonces eso es algo que es un poco a contracorriente. Ahora, en términos de Utah, lo que sí tenemos, lo cual es realmente grandioso es que tenemos muchas oportunidades de recreación al aire libre. Y eso es, por ejemplo, fui a la tienda de esquí el otro día, porque quería mejorar potencialmente algunos de mis esquís, todo se agotó. Y las bicicletas de montaña, se han agotado, se ha agotado todo tipo de equipamiento de recreación. Y eso es porque tenemos esa habilidad, tenemos un paisaje realmente hermoso. Y tenemos esa oportunidad los días, siempre me gusta decir que básicamente de noviembre a marzo, si lo haces bien, puedes esquiar temprano en la mañana, y en la noche, puedes salir a correr o hacer una bici bien porque no el clima no es tan duro, guardamos la nieve en la montaña, que es donde la queremos para poder recrearnos. Y luego, afortunadamente, en las zonas urbanas, todavía puedes saber, salir a correr por el parque. Entonces, pero nuevamente, probablemente seguiré con este tema de las disparidades sociales, no todos tienen acceso a estas oportunidades de recreación. Y aún más directamente, una parte que me perdí cuando conté la historia hace un poco, es que los espacios verdes están reservados para los ricos. Si nos fijamos en el uso de la tierra, las comunidades que están ganando un salario por debajo de la pobreza en promedio o hasta el 150% del salario por pobreza, tienen aproximadamente la mitad del espacio verde por milla cuadrada de lo que las comunidades más ricas están ganando tres veces o más. por encima del salario de pobreza. Así que esta es una gran disparidad. Así que, de nuevo, para seguir el ejemplo, soy muy afortunado de haber podido ir a menos de media montaña, simplemente troto hacia ella, compañero de entrega. Y tengo parques a mi alrededor como la naturaleza del sendero Bonneville justo al lado de la universidad, mientras que las poblaciones de bajos ingresos que pueden no tener, que literalmente pueden estar rodeadas por una jungla de asfalto, pueden no tener tantos parques y, entonces, es posible que no puedan pagar el viaje por carretera hasta Moab o arcos o en algún otro lugar. Entonces, esto es algo en lo que realmente debemos mirar para tratar de reducir esa brecha y tratar de brindar oportunidades para todos los miembros de nuestra comunidad.

 

Jessica Crate
Sí, me encanta que yo y yo, es muy importante resaltar, sabes que ninguna circunstancia, nadie es igual. Y todo el mundo está lidiando con diferentes problemas. Y no importa dónde se encuentre, dónde viva, cuál sea su trabajo, sabe cuánto tiempo ha vivido en un área, si está trasplantado o no, ya sabe, todo el mundo está lidiando, ya sabe, tratando de ajustar la situación cambiante y fluctuante en la que nos vemos obligados a estar. Entonces, ya sabes, resaltar estas cosas es muy útil. Y no solo reconociendo eso, ya sabes, si hay una manera de ayudar a tu vecino, ayuda a tu vecino, si hay una manera de ayudarte a ti mismo, ayúdate a ti mismo. Así que hablemos más sobre esto también, ya sabes, qué puedes compartir con nosotros sobre los impactos mentales y emocionales de estar en una pandemia crónica. Y luego hablemos sobre qué recomendaciones y elementos de acción puede compartir con nuestra audiencia, nuestros espectadores día sobre formas de hacer frente y simplemente prosperar, queremos que la gente se vaya a casa hoy o en este mismo segundo y diga: Oye, oh, Dios mío, este soy yo, o estoy lidiando con esto, o esto es parte de mi vida. Y no me di cuenta de que esto podría estar afectando mi salud mental, mis hijos o nuestra familia, etc. Así que hablemos de algunos de esos elementos de acción.

 

Dr. Daniel Mendoza
Creo que la primera, mencionaste la segunda idea que habría tenido. La primera es reconocer que la salud mental es una preocupación. Creo que con demasiada frecuencia no se considera una condición real. Con demasiada frecuencia se barre bajo la alfombra. Hay mucho estigma realmente asociado con la salud mental. Y también hay mucho miedo. Creo que a muchas personas les preocupa que si admiten tener problemas de salud mental, pensarán que están locos. La gente piensa que está necesitada, la gente pensará que es inestable, pero es muy similar a cualquier tipo de dolencia física, es algo que se puede tratar, es algo que, con suerte, puede desaparecer. A veces hay problemas crónicos, pero es similar a alguien que tiene dolor de espalda crónico, también puede tener algunos problemas crónicos que puede necesitar ver a un terapeuta por un período de tiempo más largo o amigos o una red de apoyo, pero no debería ser así. estigmatizado. Luego, con el segundo, llegaste muy bien. Y me gusta cómo dijiste ayuda a tu vecino, sírvete a ti mismo. Porque ayudar a alguien proporciona y es una forma muy egoísta de verlo. Pero proporciona una sensación de logro y una sensación de empoderamiento. Creo que demasiadas personas se sienten completamente impotentes y dicen que no puedo hacer nada al respecto. Y yo y yo iremos por un segundo en la dirección de la calidad del aire. Demasiada gente piensa: Bueno, hay un gran problema, no puedo hacer nada al respecto. Pero si les dices, oye, tal vez no dejes tu auto inactivo, o, ya sabes, tal vez cuando intentes ver si puedes, veo a tantas personas que, por ejemplo, usan sus cortadoras de césped o sopladores que son los tuyos. saben, funcionan con combustibles fósiles, y luego tienen a su hijo afuera, ya sabes, manteniendo la compañía que sopla directamente en la cara de su hijo, ya sabes, pequeños cambios de comportamiento, empodera a las personas y les permite volverse más poderosos y ser capaz de asumir cambios mayores. Muy similar a ayudar a otras personas. Si ves que, por ejemplo, acabas de palear la acera de tu vecino, un vecino mayor, no tiene que ser mayor, solo para ser alguien y simplemente haces una acción agradable, agradable, entonces te sientes bien. , Hice algo con mi día. ¿Qué más puedo hacer a continuación? Pero si estás sentado allí sintiéndote realmente deprimido y no puedes hacer nada al respecto, desafortunadamente, todos tenemos algún tipo de poder dentro de nosotros para hacer algo, incluso si es pequeño, incluso si solo es llamar a un viejo amigo. eso ya sabes, tal vez luchando, correcto, o simplemente uniendo a la gente a través del zoom o cualquier otra cosa. Creo que es mejor dar un pequeño paso. Y esta es una cita de Eleanor Roosevelt, con la que probablemente ya estés familiarizado, es mejor encender una vela que Maldición de la oscuridad. Así que creo que tomar esto y esto es mucho más importante en términos del aspecto de la salud mental, porque elimina ese sentimiento de impotencia, que es lo que todos sentimos. No podemos hacer nada sobre la epidemia. Quiero decir, lo intentamos, pero es un problema mucho mayor, pero podemos solucionarlo. Así que creo que definitivamente es comprensivo y hay tantas oportunidades y muchos de nosotros estamos en una posición tan afortunada que ni siquiera reconocemos que solo eso hace que sea mucho más fácil para nosotros sentir pena por nuestra posición o lo que estamos haciendo ahora mismo. Pero hay muchas personas que lo padecen mucho peor. Hay muchas personas que se han visto obligadas a trabajar en primera línea. Hay muchas personas que están abasteciendo nuestros supermercados, podemos, ya sabes, ponernos la máscara y conseguir nuestros comestibles muy rápido. Pase por el carril de pago lo más rápido posible. Y luego, cuando nos quitamos la máscara y decimos que está bien, eso es genial. Solo tardé 20 minutos en subir. Mis compras de la semana. Pero hay alguien que ha estado allí ocho horas, diez horas, a veces puede que tenga que hacer un turno doble. Entonces, ¿cómo podemos ver oportunidades para ayudar a otros? Y eso es algo realmente importante. Hay muchos grupos de voluntarios y, para volver al tema anterior sobre los espacios verdes y tener algún tipo de exposición a la naturaleza. Numerosos estudios. Y esto es de nuevo, prepandémico, se han realizado muchos sitios en el centro de la ciudad, en particular los niños, el centro de la ciudad, los niños que nunca, por ejemplo, habían podido ver una vía láctea debido a la contaminación lumínica, que nunca habían tenido ningún tipo de aventura o experiencia, como lo damos por sentado en Utah. Y luego los llevan a un campamento de verano o un viaje de verano. Y llegan a ver, por ejemplo, como dije, las estrellas La Vía Láctea, o llegan a la balsa de aguas bravas, o llegan a la bicicleta de montaña. Y lo que hace es trae una sensación de esperanza trae una sensación de Bien, ahora puedo estudiar más, puedo intentar ir a la universidad, y puedo intentar tener la vida o tal vez cada mes o cada año, puedo ir a hacer esto y tomar mi familia a ello, porque ahora Mis ojos han estado abiertos a esto. Y la otra parte es realmente la conexión con la naturaleza, los cielos oscuros, para mí es muy importante. Porque poder ver las estrellas y poder ver una vía láctea y ver lo pequeños que somos, independientemente de lo pequeños que seamos, seguimos siendo parte de la tela, todos estamos hechos de polvo de estrellas, esencialmente. Entonces, poder ver esta conexión, encontrar su lugar en el universo, eso es algo con lo que mucha gente realmente lucha. Mucha gente lo dice, lo ha hecho y es posible que no pueda vocalizarlo. Pero se puede decir que no tienen sentido de pertenencia. ¿Dónde estoy? aquí en los EE.UU. la gente en promedio, y esta era una estadística, un poco de una estadística más antigua, la gente se mueve en promedio, siete veces durante su vida. Y estoy seguro de que ese número ha aumentado mucho desde entonces creo que hay una estadística de los 90. ¿Así que de dónde eres? Siempre es una pregunta que hace que la gente diga cosas como, Oh, estuve la última vez en este otro lugar, o nací aquí, pero me crié allí. Y la gente realmente pierde una especie de sentido de a dónde pertenece. Y, obviamente, su lugar en el universo es la mejor dirección para usted, supongo. Entonces, poder conectarse de esa manera, creo que establece a muchas personas, por ejemplo. E incluso sabemos esto por una presentación formal de alguien de ascendencia nativa americana, explica de dónde son, de dónde son sus padres, de dónde son sus madres, a qué lugar pertenece su tribu. Y eso realmente establece a estos miembros de la comunidad, y realmente no se preguntan de dónde son, te dirán exactamente de dónde son. Y es por eso que no tienen este problema que pueden tener otras personas. Entonces, eso es algo que realmente debemos considerar, es realmente comprender quiénes somos y de dónde venimos, que obviamente, es la pregunta fundamental.

 

Jessica Crate
Me encanta que también me encanta el nivel superior de pensamiento, y mucha autorreflexión en la que hablas del cuidado personal, la autorrealización, la actualización y muchas de esas cosas y factores clave que nos conoces como seres humanos, solo para reconocer un eres único, tu ser humano, tienes un propósito, tienes esperanza. Y eso, ya sabes, para que si alguna vez te sientes atascado, sé que esto es malo. Mi gracia salvadora también es, ya sabes, cuando te sientas estancado o frustrado, o ay de mí, sal y ayuda a alguien más. Envíe una nota, envíe un mensaje de texto, llame al teléfono, haga algo por alguien más que no pueda esperar pagar por pintar, haga algo por otra persona y lo beneficiará 1000 veces, tal como decía documentar las dosis. Así que ama esas cosas. Espero que estén tomando notas. Siéntete libre de detener esto, rebobinarlo, jugar esto de nuevo, hay tantas pepitas geniales aquí. Ahora, una de mis preguntas favoritas también es el Dr. Daniel Mendoza. ¿Sabes? Si pudieras mover tu varita mágica, nos encantaría esta pregunta. ¿Qué crearía o le gustaría ver en nuestras comunidades, especialmente durante, ya sabe, una pandemia y, con suerte, estamos pasando de ella a algo más grande?

 

Dr. Daniel Mendoza
Sí, esa es una muy buena pregunta. Y creo que hay algunas cosas que creo que son importantes, pero creo que si voy a enfatizar más, lo que acabas de decir, cuando estamos saliendo de esto, es mirar hacia atrás y muchas cosas. Una vez que las personas salen de una situación difícil, es posible que no estén haciendo tanto balance en cuanto a lo que salió bien y lo que deben evitar en el futuro. Creo que, por mucho que podamos, ya sabes, estar molestos por la pérdida de un año, y esa es una expresión que muchas personas han dicho, creo que lo que podemos entender lo que deberíamos quitar es lo positivo de toda la experiencia, es muy fácil. Y me gusta que tu expresión sea yo, realmente yo, mucha gente usa eso y mucha gente vive eso. Pero creo que en lo que tenemos que pensar es en lo que salió bien. Y lo que fue positivo de la experiencia, porque si todos los días, solo somos ensaladas con, oh, es otro día después de mi máscara, o puedo ver a mis amigos o lo que sea, es muy fácil caer en una espiral de depresión. Pero piense en todos los aspectos positivos. Y quiero decir, puedo darte algunos ejemplos. En mi caso, y esto es extremadamente egoísta, pude aislarme y trabajar realmente en gran parte de mi investigación, porque no tenía distracciones adicionales, pude sentarme en casa y luego tener ese tiempo. . Y luego, si es muy diferente a cuando uno está en una oficina, o lo que sea, y tienes personas deambulando, o simplemente reuniones aleatorias que son reuniones improvisadas, simplemente apago Internet, y solo trabajo en mi trabajo y no puedes comunicarte. yo, es físicamente imposible. Así que sé que algunos otros colegas también han adoptado ese enfoque. Y fueron muy afortunados, pudieron hacer su trabajo y han avanzado para muchas personas. es descubrir o redescubrir el aire libre. Para muchas personas poder tener esta flexibilidad. Para algunas personas, han tenido flexibilidad, y ahora pudieron. Bueno, desafortunadamente, si te has perdido un tiempo de vacaciones, tal vez hayas ahorrado algo de dinero, y ahora has podido comprar, ya sabes, un nuevo juego de esquís o una bicicleta o algo por el estilo. Así que ahora, esta es la perspectiva de las personas que están en mejor situación, las personas que están en peor situación, bueno, tal vez hayan aprendido sobre los recursos comunitarios, tal vez algunas otras organizaciones les hayan ayudado a pasar por estos momentos. Sé que, lamentablemente, muchas personas han perdido a sus seres queridos. Eso es algo que no podemos enfatizar lo suficiente, esto ha sido muy difícil, especialmente porque se ha llevado a familias enteras. Y eso es algo a lo que nunca podemos ponerle un valor. Obviamente, no hay nada positivo. Pero para muchas personas, el tiempo adicional con la familia y nuestras vidas, hemos estado muy ocupados. Quiero decir, básicamente estamos overclockeados constantemente aquí en los EE. UU. Queremos tener otra reunión y otra reunión y hacer otra cosa. Y es solo que es esta cinta de correr que es nuevamente una gran causa de enfermedad mental porque ahora estamos pensando, Oh, bueno, la otra persona se quedó una hora más o la otra persona está respondiendo correos electrónicos a las 10 de la noche, ¿Por qué no estoy haciendo eso? ¿No voy a, ya sabes, ser retenido? ¿No voy a conseguir esa carrera? Sé que esta otra persona está haciendo esto o aquello o lo otro. Eso es un factor estresante general. Pero, por ejemplo, ya sabes, no soy padre, así que no puedo hablar de eso. Pero muchos padres se han perdido hitos importantes en la vida de sus hijos. Entonces creo que al poder estar en casa ahora, sé que hace que sea muy difícil trabajar. Y sé que hay un impacto desproporcionado en las mujeres. Sabemos que, en promedio, las mujeres han perdido al menos en la academia acostumbrada a leer esos informes. Los hombres han perdido alrededor de 500 horas de trabajo, mientras que las mujeres han perdido entre 750 y 800 horas en promedio. Y de nuevo, es la cantidad desproporcionada en la que la sociedad hace hincapié en las mujeres que compiten con niños en la sociedad en nuestra sociedad actual. Así que tenemos que ser muy conscientes de eso. Podemos simplemente decir, Oh, mira, pasaste todo el tiempo con tus hijos, porque puede ser un arma de doble filo, cierto, puedes verlos más. Pero ahora hay que prestarles mucha más atención. Pero finalmente sucedió. Y debes simplemente, creo que debes aceptar eso. Bueno, estuvo genial. Sí, mi trabajo no salió lo mejor posible. Pero al menos pude ver a mi hijo aprender a caminar o hablar o qué no. Así que debemos estar agradecidos por lo positivo que ha sucedido. Pero también sea consciente de lo que salió mal y no tenga miedo de discutir eso, particularmente con nuestras partes interesadas locales y funcionarios electos, debemos entender, mire, ya sabe, probablemente fue un error reabrir esto, ya sabe, o, por ejemplo, reducir un mandato de máscara, o hacer esto o aquello o lo otro y realmente entender esto y ser consciente, y luego trabajar con otras personas de ideas afines y hablar. Debido a que estas pandemias no van a desaparecer, es probable que las tengamos cada cinco a diez años. Por eso, ahora debemos estar mucho más preparados. Parte de la razón por la que esto se extendió tan rápido fue por el aumento en los viajes internacionales que todos vuelan, volar se ha convertido en una de las formas más rápidas y así es como se extendió desde China al resto del mundo muy, muy rápidamente. Y los gobiernos no pudieron reaccionar con la suficiente rapidez, que es lo que provocó todos estos problemas. Así que realmente tenemos que pensarlo. La varita mágica sería una de las que agradecería reconocer una visión positiva. Para ver lo positivo y lo que sucedió, estar agradecido por eso. Porque en última instancia, eso es todo lo que tienes, no puedes rebobinar, incluso si estás realmente molesto por lo que pasó, puedes rebobinar, y todos hemos pasado demasiado tiempo en negativo, piensa en el positivo, se agradecido por eso. Pero luego recuerde, qué salió bien, qué salió mal y esté más preparado para la próxima vez.

 

Jessica Crate
Me encanta, ya sabes, la gratitud lo cambia todo. Y, ya sabes, si estás sentado aquí hoy, tal vez tome una nota mental o anote en un diario, tal vez en una pizarra, ya sabe, qué lección aprendió, tal vez comparta esto con su familia, sus hijos, quien sea tu tu tu círculo es, ya sabes, pídele a algunas personas que compartan algunas ideas, ya sabes, ¿qué aprendiste de la pandemia? ¿Qué es algo que le enseñaste a otra persona? Y, ya sabes, ¿cómo podemos pagar esto y estar mejor preparados en el futuro, además de preparar a la generación futura? Entonces, ya sabes, siempre digo, enciende el interruptor, enciende el interruptor en tu, tu forma de pensar en tu vida, ya sabes, si eres tu aflicción, soy yo, o donde sea que estés, cambia ese interruptor a positivo , tómate un momento de gratitud, todos podemos encontrar algo por lo que estar agradecidos, y todos y cada uno de los momentos, sin importar cuales son nuestras circunstancias. Entonces, Dr. Daniel Mendoza, me encantan algunas de estas pepitas y, y solo su nivel más alto de pensamiento del lado de la investigación, y cómo también está interconectado, realmente es una sinergia efectiva, ya sabes, nosotros como humanos como En conjunto, a medida que caminamos por esta vida, debemos estar conscientes de las cosas para seguir adelante, todos podemos vivir nuestra mejor vida. Por último, pero no menos importante, ya sabes, estás muy involucrado en muchas comunidades. ¿Cómo es ser parte de Communities That Care y trabajar con nosotros conociendo nuestra organización, cómo te ha ayudado eso en tu trabajo?

 

Dr. Daniel Mendoza
Creo que tener una organización como Communities That Care, que no está, por ejemplo, anteriormente asociada con una agencia gubernamental, y realmente puede atraer a personas con ideas afines que de otra manera podrían sentirse intimidadas por, digamos, un puesto formal en un grupo de partes interesadas, creo que hay muchas personas que realmente quieren ayudar que tienen la experiencia del Laboratorio de Energía, que tienen el deseo de ayudar y unir ideas a un grupo de ideas afines. Creo que eso realmente agrega un valor significativo. Porque entonces, por ejemplo, con un podcast que está creando, puede educar, informar y empoderar a otras personas y presentar sus ideas sin, por ejemplo, tener un papel formal, por ejemplo, en un consejo comunitario, o incluso como funcionario electo, eso puede ser algo a lo que la gente no necesariamente quiera dedicar una cantidad significativa de tiempo, porque simplemente no pueden, o no quieren, pero todos tienen algún conocimiento que podría ser útil para la comunidad en general, todos, ya sea a través de capacitación formal o simplemente a través de experiencias de vida, tienen algo que podemos compartir. Y eso, creo, es parte de realmente empoderar a las personas. Y, y realmente preguntar, porque, nuevamente, eso es parte del aspecto de la salud mental, no pienses que eres insignificante, tu vida es única. Y hay al menos una cosa que puede presentar que puede ayudar a la comunidad a crecer, desarrollarse y mejorar. Así que creo que poder realmente mirar eso es poder invitar a la gente a compartir eso. Creo que ese es un papel realmente importante para las comunidades de atención.

 

Jessica Crate
Estoy de acuerdo 110.000%. Y es genial tenerte parte de este pueblo, esta tribu, esta comunidad, de la gente que estamos uniendo, porque se necesitan muchas personas que colectivamente están avanzando y quieren ayudar más, no solo raza humana, sino a las personas en general y para ayudar a brindar conciencia y educación. Muy emocionado de tenerte aquí. Y antes de que te dejemos ir, me encantaría que dejaras a nuestros espectadores cuál es tu cita, tu mantra, el Dr. Mendoza con el que vives y que te gustaría compartir con nuestros espectadores o tal vez un consejo del día que puedes dejarnos con

 

 

Dr. Daniel Mendoza
Hmm, eso no era parte de las preguntas. Tengo una pequeña sorpresa ahora. Pero creo que algo que siempre he hecho y esto realmente va en el espíritu, te arrepentirás más de lo que no hiciste que de lo que hiciste. Y por eso, diría que si tuviera que resumirlo en una cita es que no se puede volver a hacer en la vida. Cuando pienso simplemente sigue lo que quieres hacer. Y sigue tu pasión. No dejes que las cosas se interpongan en mi camino. Y lo que vi que realmente me impresionó fue en mi clase de graduación, cuando obtuve mi doctorado había una estudiante que también obtuvo su doctorado. Tuvo muchos contratiempos en la vida, tuvo una familia y luego tuvo todo tipo de problemas que sucedieron y finalmente pudo graduarse con su doctorado a los 91 años.

 

Jessica Crate
Guau eso es increible. Nunca eres demasiado viejo y nunca eres demasiado joven no es una cosa. Así que ama que no se arrepienta, vive la vida sin arrepentimientos. Tienes una oportunidad de esta hermosa cosa llamada vida. Entonces, tantas grandes pepitas de inspiración, sabiduría, educación. Tantas cosas geniales aquí. Tan delicioso. Así que muchas gracias, Dr. Mendoza, por sintonizarnos hoy en nuestros lunes de salud mental en un video podcast con CTC que hacemos todas y cada una de las semanas, así que siéntase libre de compartir esto, sintonice en nombre de nuestro ejecutivo. directora, Mary Krista Smith y yo. Gracias por sintonizarnos y compartir esto. Y puede encontrar un enlace a todos nuestros podcasts de video. Estoy en CTC Summit County.org. suelte un enlace a continuación. Obtenga más información sobre lo que hace Daniel Mendoza mucho más sobre sus formas de trabajo para conectarse. Y te veré de nuevo en nuestro próximo lunes de salud mental. Así que gracias de nuevo por sintonizar el documento doza. Muchísimas gracias por su tiempo. Y volveremos a hablar con todos ustedes pronto. Adiós por ahora.