Preventing Youth Substance Use with Dr. Jason Burrow-Sanchez University of Utah

May 12, 2021 | CTC Blog

Youth substance use has significant impacts on the developing adolescent brain. Join Dr. Jason Burrow-Sanchez, Professor of Counseling Psychology as he reviews major social and biological markers of adolescent development and implications for ways to approach substance use prevention/intervention. 

Specific objectives of this webinar are: 

1) Review prevalence rates for adolescent substance use in Utah

2) Review social and biological (brain development) milestones for adolescents

3) Review relation between developmental milestones and prevention/intervention of substance use

Presenter Bio: 

Dr. Jason Burrow-Sánchez is a Professor of Counseling Psychology and the Chair of the Department of Educational Psychology at the University of Utah. He is also the Director of the Mountain Plains Region 8 Prevention Technology Transfer Center (PTTC) funded by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) at the University of Utah. His research interests include the prevention and treatment of substance use for adolescents in school and community settings. His research has been funded at the local, state, and national levels and has published numerous articles, chapters and books. He is also licensed psychologist in the State of Utah.

Mary Christa Smith
Thanks for attending and welcome. We’ll give people a few minutes to stream in here. So happy that you are here joining us for our webinar tonight. So welcome to our attendees who are coming in to our webinar, zoom meeting. Glad to have you. And we’ll take a few minutes to let people file in and then we’ll get started. Okay, we’ll give people just a couple more minutes to join us. Thank you for entering the Zoom Room. And we’ll get started in just a minute, happier here. Again, welcome. We’ll get started in just a minute. And all of this will be recorded and available on our website within a week. So you can share it with folks who may not be attending tonight. But who would love to have this information? Well, in honor of people’s time, I’m an I’m a time tracker. I think we should go ahead and get started and people can come in and join us as we continue along here. Thank you for being here tonight for an event during May Mental Health Awareness Month. My name is Mary Crista Smith, and I’m the executive director of Communities That Care Summit County. And we are the Prevention Coalition for our community. And one of our priorities is to really empower adults with relevant and credible information about youth substance use the impacts of that on the developing brain so that you as a family can make the best decisions possible for what your guidance is for the youth in your care. And so I am really pleased to welcome Dr. Jason burrow Sanchez, who was a professor of counseling psychology at the University of Utah. And he’s going to be discussing with us the major social and biological biological markers of adolescent development and the implications for ways to approach substance use and prevention. So tonight, Jason will be sharing with us prevalence rates for you substance use, we’ll be looking at brain development and milestones in adolescence. And also review the relation between developmental milestones and prevention and intervention for substance use, we will have a q&a for all of you participants at the end. But you don’t have to wait till the end. If you do not want to feel free to use the q&a icon at the bottom of your screen. And you can pop questions into the q&a. And we’ll be monitoring those as we go along. You will also see a raise hand feature and feel free during the presentation to raise your hand and ask a question as we go along. You don’t have to wait all the way until the end. So there are a couple options for you as participants to ask questions. So either raise the hand at the bottom of the screen or pop things into the into the q&a feature. And so without further ado, I would like to turn this webinar over to Dr. Jason Burrow Sanchez, thank you for joining us. Tonight. We’re grateful to have you.

 

Dr. Jason Burrow Sanchez
Great, thank you, Christy. And I just want to make sure you can see my screen, right. Correct. Perfect. Thank you. Thank you everybody out there for spending the evening. With with us. So I think the goal is for the next 45 minutes or so I’ll try to go over some some slides and some background information. And then we’ll have some time at the end to do some q&a if you have some questions and so forth. And I’d be happy to answer questions, and so on. Tonight, I’m gonna be talking about the social and biological aspects of adolescent development implications for substance use prevention. I am a psychologist by training. I’m also a professor at the University of Utah and you’re about 20 years or so my research is focused on adolescent substance use in the prevention realm and treatment realm. So I have a lot of experience in that. And I’m just going to present some background information tonight about some things that I err area in terms of how do we prevent adolescent substance use? So what are some of the what are some of the factors that we probably want to consider? Before doing that, however, I wanted to let you know about a center we have housed here at the University of Utah. It’s called the mountain plains prevention Technology Transfer Center. It’s funded by samsa, or the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. So it’s federally funded, we serve region eight of the US, the upside for you is everything on our central website is free. So we do a lot of webinars like the one I’m doing tonight, we do a lot of trainings and technical assistance, and we record all those and you can access any of those you want. So we are in the third year of our five year center. These are grant granted centers. So basically, please go on and find things that you’re interested in and use them, we can give us some feedback about how they go and the website is there, you can also do a quick Google search to find it. The other thing in order to keep our center ready to do presentations like I’m doing tonight, we ask you to fill out a really quick evaluation form, which I’ll give you a QR code at the end and also drop a link in the chat at the end as well. It’s just kind of an evaluation of what you think our presentations on what kind of like and so forth. Okay, so I’m going to get right into it. These are some data from grade six, 810 and 12. From the sharp data, you may be familiar with that sharp data is taken every other year in the state of Utah since 2003. The last year we had data for is 2019. And the current year we’re collecting data for 2021. I just wanted to point out some some differences in substance use and also point out what are the most prevalent substances used by students in those grades. So as you can see on the left hand side here is to South 2017 data and then the following data set is 2019. And 2017. Alcohol was the top use substance basically in terms of frequency that flips in 2019. And what e cigarettes so probably if you work with us like I do, you probably think of alcohol, e cigarettes and marijuana or cannabis being the most prevalent substances used. Those are the most common things you’re likely to see. I know we hear a lot about prescription medications and prescription drugs which are which are bad substances Of course because of the threat of overdose and so forth. But they are not the most commonly used at least by adolescents or at least youth in this these grades. The other thing I wanted to point out is the differences between the bars here the darker blue is lifetime Yes. So basically we consider that experimental use or how to use the substance in your lifetime. And then 30 day use which we consider regular use. So if someone’s use the substance in the past 30 days We consider a regular use. So if we just look at that 2019 data here, we can see that about 18.9% of youth in the state of Utah in these grades, on average, indicate they’re using e cigarettes and about 10% indicate they’re using in the past 30 days. Okay, so just to give you some frequency counts and prevalence rates on that. The other thing I’d like to point out, however, is because the, these rates are averages, when you actually look at specific grades, they may look a little different. So as I said before, in this slide, basically 910 percent of you they’re using in the past 30 days, and so, but when you look, it really depends on what grade you’re looking at. So if you’re looking at 10th graders, it’s about 13.6, if you’re looking at 12th graders is about 15.9. So it changes. So it depends on how you’re looking at the statistics and what they tell you. But the bigger picture here, what I like to really talk about is how are you? What are the differences between youth that are using substances and youth that are not? So if we go back to the data that we just looked at in terms of E cigarettes, basically, it indicated in the past 30 days, about 90% of youth actually are not using e cigarettes, at least they indicate that, but about 10% of you are in the state of Utah. Okay. So what I like to think about is what differentiates youth from the green part of the triangle, if you will, and the yellow part of the triangle? And that’s what our conversation is really going to be about tonight, in terms of what are some things that we can think about? And from a social or behavioral perspective? And also a biological perspective? And how do we link those things together to find out kind of who ends up one part of the triangle or another? So what are things that are risk factors for us? And what are things are our protective factors, or things that protect against us? Okay. So risk and protective factors I’ll start out with and really, these are kind of the social and behavioral behavioral aspects of things that that basically put kids at risk or protect them from certain behaviors. So today, we’re going to be talking about substance use for this, this could be a behavior, this could be chapter, this could be problem behavior, this could be a violent behavior, it just depends substance use doesn’t occur in a vacuum. It clusters with other behaviors, but but tonight, we’re just gonna be talking about substance use. So if we think about a specific risk for substance use a risk may be something like the availability. So when substances are more available in a community community, they’re more likely to be used. So we consider that as a risk factor. And then we think the idea is that if there’s a risk factor involved, that leads to a higher rate of substance use, so in communities where substances are more available, they’re more likely to be used to the idea. So that would be the outcome. However, the other thing we know is that there’s protective factors, right. So protective factor, maybe something like where you may be in an environment with as high as high or higher availability of substances. But however, they have a perception of risk of using that. So they don’t think of themselves well, if I use this, this isn’t really good for me, we call that perception of risk and in the literature, and so forth. And that’s a protective factor. So that protective factor can actually intervene between the risk and the outcome. And that’s the idea. So so we’ll be talking about in a in the next slide, some more specific risk and protective factors, but I was just wanted to give you that relationship around how those three things kind of interact. So some risk factors that you’re probably already aware of are things in kind of the individual and peer domains are things like early use of substances, the earlier adolescence, or you start using substances, unfortunately, that predicts later on, they’re going to continue to use substances. Some other ones that I want to point out, I know there’s a number on this list, I’m not going to go through all of them. But the other one I want to point out is favorable attitudes towards substances, which is the third one down. If adolescents have favorable attitudes towards substances, or they’re around others who have favorable attitudes towards substances, they’re more likely to use them. Another one I want to point out is pure use of substances, which is the, I believe, the fifth one down, and pill use of substances. And a lot of these studies correlate behaviors. So it’s not a causal action, but it’s a correlation. So if you’re around other youth who use substances are you likely to use substances in terms of a correlational relationship, and we find that one of the best predictors unfortunately, so poor use of substances is one of the best predictors of whether an adolescent is using substance. So let me put this another way, if they’re hanging around peers who were using substances, a high likelihood, they are as well. Some of the family factors that also tend to come out in the literature that we we talk more about than others. I’m not going to go through all of these but a couple of ones that I just want to highlight is favorable parental attitudes towards the use of substances. If you throw around either peers, family members or older siblings, who have parental or have favorable attitudes towards substances influence tends to influence their substance use as well, but also a family history of substance use, which is unfortunately, if youth has is in a family where substance use is the norm or Common, then they’re more likely to use substances as well. Some of these risk factors we can’t necessarily control. But we can think about how we can modify or buffer them through the use of protective factors, which is what I’m going to go to in this next slide. So protective factors, one that I really want to point out, I know there’s a number of the individual level, but what I really want to point out this top one here, socio emotional, behavioral, cognitive and moral competence. So what what does that mean? So basically, we’re going to be talking about that a lot tonight, I really think about, about that as how youth make decisions, how they problem solve, how they set boundaries for themselves, and how they have a sense of self and how they operate in their environments, if they have a good sense of being able to do those things that turned out better outcomes, not just for substance use, or what for a lot of things because we know that substance use doesn’t occur in a vacuum, but it clusters with other kind of problem behaviors, if you will. Another one I want to point out is, at least to the family, school, and community level is bonding. It’s the third one down. And we know the three most most social three kind of prevalent socializing agents for youth are peers, family, and school. And the idea is that if youth has bonding or connection, at least one of those areas, they’re more likely to have better outcomes than if they don’t have bonding or connection, any of those areas. Of course, we want to have body to connection to all three of those areas are possible. But that may or may not always be the reality for some use. Okay, so risk and protective factors. I know you probably talk a lot about these. And so I’m not going to belabor these points too much. And so what I want to jump to next is adolescent brain development. And and many times, when we have we do these talks, we don’t talk about adolescent brain development enough, we spend more time talking about the social, or the behavioral aspects, which will, which the risk of protective factors fall into. But the thing about adolescent brain development is why is that important? So Well, we’ll talk about why it is part of the reason it’s important because neuroscience has really put adolescent brain development the past 25 years or so in the public space. So people don’t know more about adolescent brain development now than they ever have, in terms of one of the things that’s commonly known is the brain doesn’t fully develop until person’s mid 20s, on average. And what do we mean by that, and we’ll talk about that more specifically. But what we really mean by that is the front part of the brain or the top part of the brain, rather, this prefrontal cortex. And then another slide, I’ll kind of examine that more in terms of what that looks like. Also, we know from brain development, that the brain is structured in its different regions. So each region has a specific thing or function that it does. But there’s also interconnection between the brain, right between the parts of the brain and so forth. And we also know that the brain develops from the bottom to the top, and from the back to the front. And what do we mean mean, but brain development like so what happens is the brain get larger what what is what is going on? So basically, in a nutshell, I don’t I don’t have slides, this is a time tonight to illustrate this next point for what it means is the neurons, the connection between the neurons in the brains become more depths. And so across time, the brain is learning things. It’s a very, it’s a very specialized organ, but it’s also a very efficient organ. So as it learns things, it’s make the makes connections between the neurons. And as it doesn’t meet things in those connections drop off, there’s about 100 billion neurons when we’re born, most of those Stay with us. And those things become more specialized across time. Okay, so let’s jump into the major parts of the brain. The bottom part of the brain, which is here, this is the kind of the first part of the brain to have, you know, major connections, and so forth. This is really online when we’re born, and so forth. This helps us with things that we don’t really think about a lot kind of like autonomic processes, like respiration, blood pressure, digestion, that’s good, because when we’re young, we don’t want to have to think about those things a lot. And the middle part of the brain, which is the brain called the limbic area, we also call the emotional part of the brain is the part of the brain just starts to come online during adolescence, or puberty, if you will, and three structures that I like to point out the middle part of the brain is one called the amygdala. And if you ever heard the fight or flight response they make dilla is really connected to that response, the hippocampus which is connected to forming new memories, and also the hypothalamus, which is connected to hormones and the release of hormones, and regulating hormones. So if you work with adolescents, you not, you know that the hormones can be all over the place, or the or the observation of those in terms of moods, and so forth. And part of the reason is because the brain is learning how to emotionally regulate itself during adolescence. And that’s one of the things that’s actually supposed to stop the middle part of the brain. The last part of the brain to develop, as we talked about in the prior slide is the prefrontal cortex, which we know doesn’t fully develop on average until a person has been 20s or so. So if you think about it, one of the theories is it’s called a deficit theory. And the idea is that this part of the brain isn’t fully fully developed. So a person’s mid 20s, this middle part of the brain actually really comes alive and is developing during adolescence. So if you think about it, That way, the emotional part of the brain or the limbic area, part of the brain is fully developed during lessons, the top part of the brain is not so another. Another way to think about this is you have a Ferrari engine in the middle here, and you have the brakes, maybe you have a hybrid, so to speak, I’ve had actually adolescence kind of told me that connotation of how they think about it. Okay, but the main thing is just to think about here is there different parts of the brain and they’re developing at different times across development, I think that’s one of the major things that we’ve learned from neuroscience in the past 25 years. The other thing I really want to point out as although that what I’ve just said, is kind of based on averages, like the average adolescent, and so on and so forth. There’s incredible individual variability. So if you look at the axis here, this is age. So this is someone who’s five, and the end, x axis is someone who’s 35, zero here to five here, all this means is there’s more control for better decision making, basically, as you get higher on the scale. And so you can see this curve here, which is an average, right, but the individual dots here represent individual scores. So what I’m really trying to point out is, even though we say the top part of the brain doesn’t fully develop, and the middle part of the brain, or till a person’s mid 20s, and the middle part of the brain is developed, and somewhere in adolescence, there’s individual variability. So you’ll, you’ll run across you clearly, you’ll run across adolescents, who are 15, who make better decisions, the 25 year olds, and so forth. And that’s part of that individual variability. Okay, one of the other things that I’d like to point out is one of the markers, kind of one of the social behavioral, but also biological markers of adolescence is puberty. And how does that tie into and we’re going to try to tie this into brain development, kind of what we’re talking about puberty, the average age of puberty currently is about 12 years old. Now, the average age of puberty about 100 years ago was about 17. So it was older, it’s gotten younger, there’s some theories for that some is, in developing countries or developed countries, there’s access to better foods, or there’s more growth hormones and foods, there’s there’s no conclusion on that. But those are some of the theories, and so forth. So but what I really want you to think about is in terms of puberty is what the expectations are for adolescence. So some cultures celebrate puberty at age 13. Right, they have celebrations for it, or age 15 and the end, and when I present on this stuff, I usually ask the audience like, what are some of the things that that we observe? Or we are what are some of our expectations around puberty? For adolescence, when we see them going through these these changes? What are the expectations typically, the folks in the audience Tell me about is there’s expectations for behavior changes, there’s some idea or there’s some norm or there’s, there’s some way that we can vision that as adolescents go through puberty, the expectations for what they’re going to do is gonna be more like small adults than they are like kids, right? There’s some transitions that takes place. So really, what I’m trying to point out is, is that there is some expectation that behavior changes, and it becomes more mature when puberty occurs. But the reality is kind of what we know from the brain development is the brain doesn’t necessarily is not developing that way. In terms of what if we go back to one of the last parts of the brain to develop is the prefrontal cortex where you’re making your decisions? You’re doing your planful, thinking, consequential thinking and so forth? Why would we expect that puberty is really going to be some marker of when we should expect different behaviors? What’s really occurring from a biological perspective is that middle part of the brain is coming online, right? The hormones, emotional regulation, emotional functioning, and so forth. Learning how really to regulate those within their environment. Okay. The other thing I really like to point out is that our age based markers, and I found the left hand side, the ages are kind of chronological ages. And then the the right hand side are the markers. So at age 13, right, we consider that a youth a teenager, but what does that really mean? Based on what we just learned about brain development? Should it be age 13? You know, I don’t know, generally from a behavioral perspective, or expectations change. But if we really think about the adolescent brain development should that age 16 driver’s license, right? adolescents can can then drive, but we know insurance companies charge a heck of a lot more for insurance for adolescents, rental car companies, you can’t rent cars, it’s 25. They do that because they know the averages, in terms of getting into an accident are higher for adolescence. So from a brain perspective, probably 16 isn’t a great age for don’t tell adolescence to snap to the driving isn’t isn’t a great idea. Age 16 ajt voting, you can join the military, so on and so forth. Again, that’s great. Usually, these things are based on legislation and social norms are not necessarily based on adolescent brain development. Same thing with use of tobacco products. How did we decide that 18 or 21 is the right age to use tobacco products? Or to use alcohol? How did we decide? 21 is the right age. She’s out So what I’m trying to get out here is some of our social norms, or our legislative norms are not based on science, per se. They’re based on on some idea, the why when we should do things wet. And they don’t always connect with what we know now about the brain. Okay, one of the other things I do like to point out, and this is kind of a good new slide. And the good news is, by and large, most adolescents are actually pretty good at decision making, even though we know that the brain develops at different times across time during adolescence. And again, on average, the prefrontal cortex isn’t fully developed until merces, person’s mid 20s. And so when they’ve done studies looking at youth, and how they make decisions, and in this, this actual study here, that I that I cite here is not from a substance use case study, it’s just from a decision making task, and so forth. So what I just want to point out is the dark line here, the black line, basically is indicating that as the youth is getting older, this is dropping, and what it means is they’re dropping, and the propensity to make risky decisions. And what this known means is when the risks are known, adolescents tend to make less risky decisions as they get older. Okay. The other one, the blue line here is ambiguous. So when the risks are ambiguous, it tends to peak out around 16 to 20. And then it tends to drop. So even when adolescents are ambiguous about the riskiness of making a particular decision, it tends to drop off across time. There is one subset of adolescence, and this is a smaller sort of, subset of adolescents and where the red line here, and these adolescents, we can usually tell from a younger age, because they exhibited, exhibit various behaviors, like using substances at younger age or other problem behaviors flowing out of schools, so on and so forth. And there’s a chart here or there’s the graph here, that’s kind of indicating that they tend to peak out at 12, and 14, so their capacity to make more risky decisions. And they we call these youth insensitive to knowing the risks or not, it really doesn’t matter. And sometimes we call these common vernacular, impulsive youth and so forth, that they tend to pick out earlier. So many times with, when we work with youth, we find ourselves having more problems earlier on, these tend to be these youth in the red by, and it’s a smaller subset of us. So we go back to our triangle, this is probably the 10% of you, who are actually using substances early on or more at risk for doing that. The other thing I really want to point out, overall from this slide, is that when you know the risks of making certain decisions, they tend to make less risky decisions. And that points going to be important as we as we continue to move forward in this conversation. Okay, so we’re going to go back to the brain. So we’re kind of going back and forth between some social behavioral aspects, and then some biological aspects. And I wanted to point out what kind of really happens with the, with the brain in terms of when substances are introduced. So the interesting thing about substances, if we didn’t have substances in the environment, we’d really never have to talk about this per se, right? But we do. And then substances get us and that there’s a connection, and there’s an interaction with how they operate within the brain. And really what they do with the brain is they they change the chemical balance of what’s going on in the brain. And one of the things that we really pay attention to in terms of the research literature and so forth is how substances influence what we call the reward pathway. And so you can see this slide here, the activation reward pathway by addictive drugs, you can see very much when we take that away, you can see various drugs, here’s heroin, here’s alcohol, here’s cocaine, so you can tear and tear when again, nicotine. So what you can see here is the reward pathways activated by certain and these are not this list of substances is not exhaustive by any means. But they’re all substances that that are used react in very similar ways across this reward pathway. And so you can see either substances react directly or more indirectly, in the case of alcohol here on this reward pathway. So what happens? So basically, just from when when we’re not talking about substances, anytime we experience things, something that’s pleasurable, like we eat food, we have sex, we have we are, we are nurtured in some ways, things that we experience as pleasurable. What happens in the reward pathway is dopamine is released. Okay? And dopamine is released in these two areas. Here, one’s called the ventral tegmental area, and you don’t need to know that at the BTA the nucleus accumbens, and then up here, it’s connected to the prefrontal cortex. As dopamine gets released, it tells the brain I like this, keep doing it. So for eating food, right, I’d like this, keep doing it until the mechanism in your body says I’m sated, and that’s enough. You don’t have to eat anymore, and so forth. And those are good things because those are things we want to have happen. Well, it turns out when substances are introduced to the brain, they mimic that action. So they also release dopamine. It’s the reward pathway. So what substances do is mimic the action that naturally occurring reinforcers do in the environment. The issue with that, though, is that drugs or substances can also mimic the body’s response to stress. So as dopamine gets released, what’s also gets released is a thing called cortisol. Okay, so remember what I talked about the middle part of the brain, and the middle part of the brain, especially the, the amygdala, the fight or flight response, and so forth. One of the things that happens when we have the fight or flight response, it releases some chemicals in the brain, with the hypothalamus, and one of the chemicals that get released is called cortisol. And we’re cortisol, it’s a good it’s a good chemicals, gives increases our adrenaline, so on so forth. One of the things that it does in terms of impacting the brain, it also slows down the prefrontal cortex. So that’s good, because it’s kind of fight or flight response. For example, if we have to think about things too long, that’s not good for us. So if we put our hand on a hot stove, right, and we immediately pull it back, that’s kind of the fight or flight response, inaction. And it what it what’s happening is very quickly, it’s it’s throwing out cortisol, and it’s saying, front part of the brain or top part of the brain where we make decisions, I want you to slow down, I don’t want you to think about this too long, I just want you to pull your hand off. Because if we stuck it, if we thought about it too long and kept our hand on the burner, we’d burn ourselves, right and more so than we probably wrote, we’ve already done. But what happens is substances that youth and adults use, they also mimic that the interaction between the dopamine and the reward pathway. So as dopamine gets released, also, chemicals like cortisol get released, which slow down the prefrontal cortex. So even though the brain saying I like this, I like this, do more, do more, do more. Our capacity for making decisions and making judgment actually sounds down. So when someone’s under the influence of particular substances, that’s one of the things you’re seeing is a reduced capacity for decision making, because in fact, the prefrontal cortex is getting slowed down. That’s also one of the concerns of adolescent development. When we talk about how does the brain become disrupted across time of adolescence consistently use various substances, one of the things that that we think we don’t know for sure, is that the prefrontal cortex or this top part of the brain gets disrupted. And its ability to make connections, because it actually because of things like cortisol and other things getting getting pushed out to the brain, these are chemicals, that it slows down the capacity to make these connections across time, which is something we actually want to have happen. We want this top part of the brain to become stronger through experience, through making difficult decisions, and so forth. Because that’s how we know in terms of how neurons Connect, how we make decisions, or how we learn behavior, through repetitive action, and so forth. And that’s what we really want to have happen. But if the if substances slows down that process, the availability or the opportunity for that to happen, slows down as well. Let me give you another example. Watching, this is just my circles here. So green part of the brain, or green part here is just the reward pathway top for the brain’s prefrontal cortex. So we’ve already talked about those a few slides back. But this is another slide this this particular slide is actually referring to its dopamine, which I just talked about, which is one of the neurotransmitters in the brain, and one of the ones is pretty well studied. This is referring to cocaine. But again, you all substances that are used pretty much react in very similar ways. But what it’s saying here is is inheres them this middle part of the brain that I just pointed out. So here’s what I talked about the ventral tegmental area, which is that part of the nucleus accumbens, and then the prefrontal cortex and these things interact together. And what happens when we do things like eat food, and that reward pathway, dopamine gets released, and that’s good. And it tells our brain, you know, do this again, do the scan? Well, unfortunately, what happens with particular drugs that are that are used or overused, or abuse is the dopamine gets released an exaggerated amount. So you can see this here, and this is one example of cocaine. And what we think one of the problems with that is that it gets it reduced and exaggerated amounts in terms of the reward calf pathway. And it actually changes the influence or the mechanism of how that’s getting released in the brain in terms of the reward pathway, but also a house house is getting processed. And one of the two things that that’s really becomes troublesome for is one, if you’ve if you’ve worked with folks who use substances over a long period of time, typically they tend to need more substance to get the same pleasure and amount of pleasure. That’s called tolerance. And that’s where part of what we think’s going on here is that the dope mean needs to have more higher levels across time to experience that same level of pleasure. And then if the substance is taken away, essentially what happens is the dopamine decreases within the prefrontal cortex I’m sorry, the the reward pathway and we Call that withdraw in the sense that the body reacts to that and says, I don’t like that I want more dopamine, which, you know, the levels that I had before and so forth. So one of the questions I always get is, if drugs are not used over a period of time, will this mechanism, go back to what it was before? And that’s one of the things we don’t know. So if you’ve worked with folks who use substances over long periods of time, some of the things they do tell you is, I can’t experience joy in the way that I have in the past. Or I don’t experience it in the same way, and so forth. And what we think from a biological perspective is it’s it’s this relationship or this mechanism for how dopamine is released, and the reward pathway changes. Okay, but we don’t know the thing is we don’t know how long that takes, how much substance that takes, and how many years that takes so to speak. Okay, because that’s, that’s just a simple kind of overview of brain development, and so forth. And now I want to talk about some, some things that are related. So kind of bringing this picture home, adolescent risk taking impulsivity and cognitive control, because when we talk about adolescent risk taking, it’s something that we anticipate occurring during adolescence. And when we go back to thinking about that middle part of the brain, especially that reward pathway with the ventral tegmental area, and the nucleus accumbens, those are two structures that are really related to adolescent risk taking. And as those things come online, during during the adolescent period of development, we actually expect that adolescents are going to take more risks, they’re going to engage in more some sensation seeking behavior. And we actually, when we study this, across time, we know that adolescence, just observational data, we know that adolescents take more risky behavior than younger youth do, or that older youth do show when I showed you those curves on other chart, by and large, there’s, they tend to top out, you know, like by 16, to 18. But adolescents by and large, do take more risks, but we anticipate that just from kind of typical brain development. The other thing we know is that impulsivity correlates with risk taking. So this is when you kind of don’t think about specific behavior, and so forth. And we think part of the reason this occurs is because that middle part of the brain is really coming online during adolescence. And that top part of the brain isn’t fully online. So the brain is kind of adjusted to how do I make decisions, right? How do I how do I hold off consequences? Right? How do I if I want to get a reward really quickly? Well, how do I hold off other consequences, which you can think of, like planful decision making are consequential thinking, and so forth? And how does that work? And if if you don’t, if you work with adolescents, you know that that’s sometimes what they struggle with, in terms of how to make decisions and how to do things, how to hold off on certain rewards, how to have longer term outcomes, and so on and so forth. But if we think about it from a biological perspective, and from an observational perspective, in terms of what they actually do, we actually anticipate that happening. The problem is when we introduce substances, and so forth, like I showed you through reward pathway actually kind of fouls up that process. So it slows down the prefrontal cortex. And it makes it even more difficult, more challenging to make good decisions. which throws us to our next point, which is cognitive control, this is what we actually want adolescents to do, I think, is make good decisions have consequential thinking of good and problem solving skills, because we know what adolescents have these things, they can have better outcomes, not just in substance use, but a whole lot of life outcomes in terms of what they do. So really what the when we kind of bring together with the social behavioral, and in the brain development stuff tells us, it kind of tells us what are some of the things that we should be working on with adolescents. So if we know the middle part of the brains pretty much coming online during adolescence, but that top part of the brain is not fully online. So teaching things like decision making and problem solving skills, and capacity for emotional regulation are probably pretty good things that we could be teaching adolescents, especially if we want to enhance and build that prefrontal cortex. And we’re from a, from a really fundamental biological perspective, it’s really making those connections, those neuronal connections in the top part of the brain. Okay, so prevention principles, and so forth. Some things that I want to kind of wrap this all up or tie this together with is one, well, I have a number here. But here’s the first one, prevention is important. It’s important to either prevent substance use in the first place. So to prevent the youth from getting to the, to the yellow part of the triangle, right? Keep them in the green part of the triangle. Or if they get to the old part of the triangle, how do we how do we get them back down to the green part of the triangle? So how do we prevent something from getting worse? Right prevention in the first part is just kind of primary prevention, probably something we should be doing anyway. So how do we kind of the next next points here? How do we go about doing that? One of the ways is just be really honest about teaching, teaching youth about changes in the brain, the body. We know there’s developmental growth periods. We know there’s the facts. On substances in the brain and body, we know that we know more now than we ever have. And we’ll know more, you know, five years from now than we ever have. So the idea is, there’s no reason this is not a mystery that shouldn’t be hidden. One way I’ve worked with adolescents and focus groups and ask them, What are things that they want to know, number one on their list is what substances do to your brain in your body? They want to know what are some of the risks if I use these particular substances, if we look back to the problem solving kind of decision making literature graph that I showed you, we know that adolescents make better decisions when they have more accurate information. If you don’t give them that information, it’s really hard for them to make better decisions. Most adolescents I’ve worked with, are going to spend more time researching their next iPhone purchase, then they’re going to research the next substance they’re going to put in their body. Okay, but the next substance they put in their body can have a bigger impact than what their next iPhone is. Another thing we know, for just thinking about the adolescent brain development, middle part of the brain is coming online, that limbic area or emotional part of the brain, if you will. So there’s nothing wrong with teaching emotional regulation, right in concert with teaching how to make decisions around that. And we know from a biological perspective, or from the adolescent brain development perspective, that’s going to be something that’s probably pretty important to teach during adolescence. One of the things when I work in schools, I always talk about Unfortunately, we don’t spend time teaching these things directly, we usually do indirectly. So basically, if we do if we teach about what we teach concepts like problem solving, it’s usually more indirect. So an algebra class, we maybe teach how to solve for x. But how does not alesund solve for x when they offered substances at a party? Right? Do we teach that explicitly, and most the time we don’t. And also teaching more specifically teach about problem solving and decision making skills, understanding the consequences of choices and plan for behavior. So these things are all part of the brain stuff, we want to teach those things specifically, there’s no reason we shouldn’t. And actually, we know that when adolescents have better decision making capacity, better problem solving capacity, they tend to do better, and a lot of different areas. And the other thing I want to leave you with here, too, in terms of prevention principles and intervention principles, is really teach the influence of contextual pressure. For things like peer pressure, social media advertising, you know, we can use this example in terms of substances, how does that influence what they do? e cigarettes we can use as an example, I have a whole nother lecture I do on E cigarettes. E cigarettes are great at advertising, unfortunately. And they do market towards us. And so how do we teach youth about the marketing strategies that businesses have about getting them to use their products or wanting them to use their products? And how can they overcome that, using their front part of the brain that we know that’s fully developed yet, but we can actually impact that by teaching those skills that they need? So this slide is really to give you some ideas for extending one of the things that I always get asked is, well, what program should I use? Or how do we prevent it, and so forth, you know, I don’t really care what program you use, per se, what I want you to use is, is a program or whatever that means, that makes sense for the setting that you’re in and is really serving the goals of what you want to do. But I would say more importantly, whatever program or whatever intervention you choose, should have elements of the bullet points here should have something around how do we prevent these things in the first place, teaching about what we know about the brain in the body, right? The social, the behavioral, the biological aspects, teaching about emotional regulation, teaching about problem solving, decision making skills, teaching influence, and contextual pressure from if we just take it fundamentally, from a social, behavioral and biological perspective, we kind of know, these are some of the things that adolescents are probably going to need to know in order to make better decisions and make better choices, which I think ultimately, that’s kind of what we want them to do. Okay. So as I said, at the beginning of first 45 minutes or so was just going to be me going over some slides and giving you some background information. I think the next part, we’re going to spend some time to q&a, I’m happy to answer some questions around q&a. And the other thing I just wanted to say is there’s my contact information, if you, you know, wanted to reach out to me at any one time. And the other thing is, I said, as I said at the beginning, we have a center that in which we’re able to do these types of presentations. So you can actually take a picture of that with your on your QR scanner on your cell phone right now. It’ll take you right to a survey. It’s a really quick survey that we use for our center. And I would really appreciate if you did that, also drop a link in the chat in which I can you can use as well. We’ll take you right there to your web browser. So I am going to just give folks a few more seconds to do that. But I’m happy to answer your questions or do what you need me to do.

 

Mary Christa Smith
So thank you so much. Wow, that was a fabulous and information packed. We have a q&a. You can see at the bottom of your screen it says q&a. So feel free to put questions in there. Or you can also see in under the right next to it, it has a raise hand feature. And you can raise your hand and we will unmute you and allow you to ask your question directly. And while we’re waiting for you to do that, I have a question and in relationship to what you said about youth, and if they’re given the information about the impacts on the brain and the body, that that is, it helps them to make healthier choices, and it’s a prevention strategy. Do you have any particular resources that you point, youth to for that information that they find compelling?

 

Dr. Jason Burrow Sanchez
That’s a that’s a great point. So honestly, I think one of the best things, so I’ve done this work with youth as young as sixth grade. So I’ve taught the brain development stuff to really young youth. And usually when you work in sixth grade, it’s more about keeping them in their seat. And you know that it’s a little bit different than 12 pairs and say so, but they get the concepts. And I think the main thing is, is teaching the basic fundamental concepts of how the brain operates, the connection to using various substances, and so forth. I do I don’t have it in this slide deck. But I do have some things there’s a NightA, or the National Institute on Drug Abuse has a great website called metta for teens. And it has a lot of great information that it’s geared towards teachers or parents or teams, that explains a lot of this stuff. They’re using the brain development, kind of piece of evidence, and developmental piece of things, to really provide good explanations to youth in ways that make sense. And they do it they do it in a number of different ways from kind of a fundamental level of how to listen graded on work, also across particular substances. Even though I made some generalizations about substances, there’s there are some differences and some nuances of various substances. Nicotine is one I didn’t talk about as much. I have a whole nother lecture on that only do I talk about e cigarettes and so forth. But nicotine is a really potent substance, that youth is one of the first things that you pick up. And so on. So so I really think it depends on the age of the youth you’re working with, because that’ll kind of connect to their kind of cognitive. You know, cognitively where they’re at. and comprehension in terms of in terms of that. So sixth graders, for example, you know, my example sixth graders very different controls better. So

 

Mary Christa Smith
Thank you, that’s really helpful to know. Is there a way that you could put that is it nyda? 

 

Dr. Jason Burrow Sanchez
Yeah. 

 

Mary Christa Smith
In the chat,

 

Dr. Jason Burrow Sanchez
Teams, you can just so that there’s a national drug abuse, and you can actually just Google that they’ll come right up.

 

Mary Christa Smith
Thank you. Any other questions or comments? Now’s your time to ask your burning questions. And you can either raise your hand, or put it in the q&a.

 

Dr. Jason Burrow Sanchez
So I’ll just share some stuff. Sometimes I’ve done these conversations. And sometimes parents are at home with their teams are watching the screen when I put up these various slides, and they have conversations right there. I’ve had them tell me like, some of the, you know, prevalence data, or whatever it is more than anything, I hope that some of the information I’ve provided you as a conversation starter, for how to talk with teens about various substances or, or what questions that have really, I think it’s around dispelling any of the myths and really kind of using factual information about what we know.

 

Mary Christa Smith
Have you seen any communities or organizations that you feel like are doing this work really well, that you could point to as models or examples?

 

Dr. Jason Burrow Sanchez
Well, I think so I think Utah so I work across six different states for our center. And actually, I will say, I don’t have any specific communities per se that I’ll point to, but I’ll point to some specific states and I think you talk she does a pretty well. One of the things we look at is use rates kind of prevalence rates across the various substances, you know, the most frequently used substances by youth are e cig and disorder, e cigarettes, alcohol and cannabis. And we also look at one of the protective factors that that is measured is, is the perception of risk. And what we find is that there’s a correlation so as youth perceive a substance to be more harmful to the to the brain or to the body or just in general to them. They’re less than I can use it. And actually out of the six states that we kind of track from our center in Utah, she does pretty well, in terms of that. So I would say it’s, it’s probably about one, you know, kind of strategies in terms of one, knowing your knowing your audience, knowing your community, using the data that you have to kind of know your community, what the prevalence rates are finding intervention or or prevention, preventive interventions, you know, whatever you want to call them, that makes sense for your community based on what you’re really trying to address. So I would really say what are the things you’re trying to address should probably come first, and then choose interventions or preventive interventions make sense to address those things. So if you’re trying to focus on you know, a couple different risk factors or a few different or, or highlighting or enhancing specific protective factors, you know, then those are things you want to do. So I think each, you know, for better or for worse, each community is always different, you know, in terms of how they can approach things and what resources they have, and community involvement and so forth. So, but I think as a state action yutan, I’m not just saying that I actually, from the data actually need to do the job. So

 

Mary Christa Smith
I have to say, I agree with you, I have colleagues in California and Colorado, and they, because of the much more liberal attitudes towards substance use. They they have a bigger struggle and much larger use rates amongst.

 

Dr. Jason Burrow Sanchez
Yeah, so we have states reach out to us in our six states that we cover. So we cover the States. In our center, we cover the states of Utah, Colorado, Wyoming, Montana, North and South Dakota. So we have different states in our our area three is called region eight, reach out to us and ask us about, you know, how do we were going to restructure our prevention efforts? What should we do? And the first thing I always say, well, let’s kind of look at your data and see what you have, in terms of what are the things you really want to address? So, you know, I know we talked about data informed decisions and so forth. But But what you know, what kind of picture can we kind of see in terms of what’s going on, because you could choose, that’s why I always say, I, as people talk about interventions, and so forth, I know, you know, there’s a lot of great interventions out there. And you can have the best intervention since sliced bread, or you know, since the pocket it sure, whatever you want to say. But the reality is that only work is really addressing things you want us to address. So if it works for your community, so to speak. So I really think it’s starting at a place where you can really figure out what that is. And I think having communication with your community members with the youth, you know, will help kind of help you better understand what that looks like.

 

Mary Christa Smith
Well, interestingly, for us, one of our priority risk factors is parental attitudes that are important one, when we look at Summit County, in general, and Park City, in particular, we tend to have higher use rates than the state average. And one of the you know, some of the data that we look at, indicates that because of our social norms, and our party culture, and people come here to vacation, that that plays a role. And that we also know that the number one place kids are using alcohol, and marijuana is at home with their parents permission. And so what’s fascinating to me is, on the one hand, I think parents are doing harm reduction. They’re saying it’s safer if you use at home with me, because then you’re not driving in your car. And, you know, you know what happens with youth when they are unsupervised, whether it’s assault or what have you, that can happen. But on the other hand, we know that favorable parental attitudes actually increase the risk.

 

Dr. Jason Burrow Sanchez
Yeah,

 

Mary Christa Smith
I hope our community here with somewhat liberal attitudes about youth substance use and, you know, a pattern in our community of hosting parties for kids or allowing them to use at home out of a sense for some folks have, it’s better at home under my watchful eye than not, how do we, how do we talk to parents about that? What advice?

 

Dr. Jason Burrow Sanchez
No, I think that’s a great question. So So the three socialized agents, you know, that I really see with in, you know, my work with us, our peers, family, in school, right? So, you know, because they spend the most of their time in one of those, and then all those, of course, are surrounded by community. But you know, what I’ve done a lot of I’ve done parent nights for schools, and I get I get questions like this from parents, and so forth. And I say, Well, one of the things that I would say as a parent, just be really clear on what your norms are, right? Because if you’re not clear on what your norms off, if you leave that ambiguous, there’s a high likelihood that you are getting these substances such as kind of the weight or do or do some other things. It’s not, you know, nicad is such a substance use. One of the things, we also noticed that we just did a paper on E cigarettes with the sharp data using the 2009 2017 data I just present on this. And actually what we did is we took all the risk and protective factors. And we looked at what are the what are the ones that predict the most? And what are the ones in terms of risk factors? What are the ones that are kind of predict better in terms of protective factors and what we found for risk factors, that the one predicted the highest for kids who are actually going to use e cigarettes is having been around peers who are also using cigarettes, right? So not surprising. But one of the ones that actually predicted the best in terms of productive protective factor is viewing e cigarette as being harmful. So it goes back to the idea that if you’ve used something as being harmful, you’re actually less likely to do it. And then the data actually correlate this by we look at state state as well. So what I would say is one for parents to have an honest conversation are now a conversation, at least, about what substances are. And because one of the things we want adolescents to do is start making their own decisions using accurate information, right, we think about adolescent brain development, so forth. And we know that adolescents tend to make better decisions when they have better information that also comes from the kind of adolescent decision making literature and so forth. And also teach them about some of the things we know and we don’t know about what substances do to the brain and body. E cigarettes is a great one with it, we don’t know a lot about to be quite honest, I have a whole nother presentation I do an E cigarettes, it’s a fairly newer substance that hasn’t been around as long and we have less data on regular combustible cigarettes, we have decade’s worth of data on right. Unfortunately, that’s one of the the the substances that youth pick up early on his regular combustible cigarettes. As some of the things we also know from, when we look at the popular media is we hear a lot about opiates. And of course, that’s that’s really horrible. And, and one of the reasons we’re sure about those is the number of deaths, because I think this year, we’re going to talk probably at 90,000 deaths in the US from overdose, which is horrible. But I think the other thing people don’t always understand is that number when you compare that to other substances, so if we multiply that number by five and then add some, we then we get close to how many people die every year from smoking combustible cigarettes. Okay, so that’s about half a million, which people don’t always take into account. And that’s one of the first substances that you start to pick up. If we got if we got rid of smoking combustible cigarettes, we get rid of about a third of all cancers, believe it or not. So those are some of the conversations that I think parents should have, you know, with youth around what what the substances are, what are the some of the things we do know about it? What are some things we go, I’ve worked enough in prevention, I’ve done treatment studies where I have plenty of youth in treatment studies who come in and tell me about the all the benefits of cannabis and so forth. And my job is not to be pro or con against one thing or another. And especially as the legalization of cannabis changes, every voter, every voter cycle, right? Every ballot cycle in terms of what that looks like. And now if you haven’t looked at it recently, Utah surrounded by by states, please three states that have medicinal and recreational use of cannabis. Right? So we know that’s going to, it’s going to change soon, probably. We already have medicinal use cannabis can use all. But then I talked about some of the facts that what what do we really know? What is the science really know about medicinal use of cannabis and other things? Right. So you can really have some reasons, discussion about what we know, and what we don’t know about what some of these things are. So I really think about your questionnaire. That’s kind of a long winded answer. But go back to your question. I really think it’s about having conversations, these things being conversation starters about what the information is about. And if you don’t know, as a parent, I don’t always know how many times I start these talks by saying there isn’t any one person who knows all there is to know about substances by far. So I go look it up, right? Why wouldn’t I want a model? How do I research things? And how do I find information? And how do I tell what’s more accurate information or not? And some of the interventions we deal with you with that’s actually one of the modules. We do a research based intervention, because they’re taught how to do research papers and how to research information, why wouldn’t why wouldn’t we teach them how to research things that they may put into the body, and so forth? Anyway, so that’s kind of a long answer to your question but no.

 

Mary Christa Smith
Thank you. That’s super helpful. I think Heather has a question, Heather, are you there?

 

Heather
Yes. Hello, I have a question for you. First of all, thank you for this high level science evidence based overview of the impact of substance use on developing brains. And my question is for a teen who may be challenges this information or parent who wants to task their youth to Write a, you know, a paper on the impact of this on their brain? What resources do you recommend they they turn to for a deeper dive?

 

Dr. Jason Burrow Sanchez
So so one of the things like I said, 1940s is a great resource. But one of the, one of the things we do in our work with teams is we actually, we post some of those questions, actually. And we have them do we even call it we don’t call it homework. We call them practice sheets, or, you know, practice opportunities. And the idea is that we, we get them, we asked them, What are the three things? What are the things you want to know about substances? Like, what are the burning questions that you have? Because whatever motivates us not this may not be what motivates the team. So we really want to find something that motivates the team. Right? So what questions do you want to know? Do you have a burning question about cannabis? Or e cigarettes or whatever? Maybe, and find that? And and then we say, what is the next step? In terms of where would you go to look for information? So one of my jokes is if they’re going to High Times calm, then I always say in the audience, if you don’t know what that is, go look it up. But if that’s your main resource, or your primary source, that’s probably a lot different than night, right? That’s what’s your drug abuse? But the thing is, I think what we’re trying to teach is how do you research information? And then how do you verify resource resources are primary sources? In terms of what they look like? Right? What is the information you’re gathering? Where do they come from? and so forth. So so that’s one aspect of it. The other aspect you mentioned, Heather, is is the challenging piece. And and I in my goal is I think I was answering all the questions, because I’m not a pro or con guy, right? I’m not going to tell you to do this, you’re not to this. So when I teach this, I teach a substance abuse counseling course in my graduate program here, and I get graduates all the time, they won’t argue with me about you know, whether marijuana cannabis should be legalized. And I go, that’s that’s not my thing. You know, I’ll leave that to the voters. I’ll leave that to the politicians, because I’m not going to influence that anyway. However, what I’m here to tell you about is what the science what science? Do we know, does this campus really help with depression? anxiety? I haven’t seen those things. I don’t know that to be the case from a science based perspective. But what what do we what do we know? Or what we don’t know. And let’s be honest about that. So when I’ve had youth who come in, who’ve been in my treatment studies and said, Can brought in just kind of what you’re talking about, say, Well, you know, cannabis is good for you. It’s natural, it’s nerve, it’s from the earth, all that stuff. And I said, you know, I’m not going to transfer. But I’m going to say, give me some information that kind of helps me understand that helps me understand your perspective. So what I really think is more important, is being able to connect with the adolescent and understand their perspective. And can I think, at the same time connecting so that they can understand your perspective in terms of what you’re both trying to talk about. But I really think coming to coming to common ground, and what’s kind of, you know, science based evidence based information that seems reasonable, because sometimes some of the arguments, I’ve worked enough with adolescence, to know that some of their arguments kind of fall apart, when they get them out inside their head. And they start to you know, explicate them in the in the ether spear there and just tried to talk about them, they don’t always make as much sense as that. And it’s really hard, you know, as as we start to move forward in some of these concepts is to really negate or really not take account into all the stuff we know about brain science and how the brain operates, and so on and so forth. So I think more than anything, I want to empower them with information, good information, and how they can access that because I think that’s so much more important. And if I have to generalize some of their, how do I find the next best iPhone skills, research skills, then I’ll do that. Right. I’ll ask him, like, how did you find your next iPhone purchase? Because you know, the research now? And then I’ll say, how do you generalize that to someone else? Now, when you want to know? And so I always kind of turn it around into a bit of a challenge. And and when we’ve done sessions with adolescents, around one of the sessions we do is why did why do we think people use substances, even the toughest adolescents I’ve worked with, when I when I posed the idea, why do you think people use substances I haven’t met one yet, doesn’t have some reason why they think that occurs, whether it’s, you know, kind of right or wrong, or whatever. But the idea is just engagement engaging in the process.

 

Mary Christa Smith
Thank you. That was a great question, Heather, and I appreciate your thoughtful answer, Jason. Is there anyone else besides Heather Knight, who would like to pose a question in our last few minutes, this is your, this is your chance, this is your opportunity. So if you would like to, you can raise your hand at the bottom of the screen and give you a minute or two to decide. And if not, then just know that this webinar will be posted to our website, usually within a week, and we’ll share it out with all of you. And we’ll post some links along with that on our blog. So That you can share this with other folks who will be interested in hearing this information that we’ve heard here tonight. So not seeing other hands. Jason, I just want to thank you so much for sharing your expertise. This is one of you know, when we when you talk about, you know, what are the risk factors in your community, we’ve identified perceived risk of substance use, kids don’t see it as risky, parental attitudes favorable to substance abuse, as well as depression and anxiety. And so yeah,

 

Dr. Jason Burrow Sanchez
I’ve seen your stuff. I think, actually, you’re right on. So so we do empirical studies in the backend testing those. And I think you’re right on, honestly. So with the things you’re looking at, to be quite honest, I’ll send you a paper we just did on E cigarettes that looks at all the risk and protective factors in the sharp for that. But yeah, I think you’re, you’re onto the right things.

 

Mary Christa Smith
Well, it’s a big issue to tackle. And I’m just so pleased that our community now has this resource, because I agree with you that the more parents understand the impact on the adolescent brain, and the more youth understand that impact empowers them to make informed and hopefully healthier, better choices for themselves. So this webinar tonight has certainly provided us a resource for our community to have that information. So I’m really appreciative of you for coming and sharing with our community today.

 

Dr. Jason Burrow Sanchez
Thank you for so I was happy to do it. I hope it’s it’s practical information that folks can use. That’s my big goal. 

 

Mary Christa Smith
It absolutely is. So thank you. Dr. Jason burrows Sanchez, thank you to all of you for attending. You will be able to find all this on our website at CTC summit county.org. Have a wonderful night.

 

Dr. Jason Burrow Sanchez
Thank you. 

 

Mary Christa Smith
Bye

“Utilizamos un servicio automatizado para esta traducción. Somos conscientes de que puede haber errores y agradecemos su comprensión”.

María Christa Smith
Gracias por asistir y bienvenidos. Le daremos a la gente unos minutos para transmitir aquí. Muy feliz de que se unan a nosotros para nuestro seminario web de esta noche. Así que bienvenidos a nuestros asistentes que vienen a nuestro seminario web, reunión de zoom. Afortunado de tenerte. Y nos tomaremos unos minutos para permitir que la gente ingrese y luego comenzaremos. Bien, les daremos a las personas solo un par de minutos más para que se unan a nosotros. Gracias por entrar en Zoom Room. Y comenzaremos en solo un minuto, más felices aquí. De nuevo, bienvenido. Empezaremos en un minuto. Y todo esto se grabará y estará disponible en nuestro sitio web dentro de una semana. Para que pueda compartirlo con personas que quizás no asistan esta noche. Pero, ¿a quién le encantaría tener esta información? Bueno, en honor al tiempo de la gente, soy un rastreador de tiempo. Creo que deberíamos seguir adelante y empezar y la gente puede entrar y unirse a nosotros mientras continuamos aquí. Gracias por estar aquí esta noche para un evento durante el Mes de Concientización sobre la Salud Mental de mayo. Mi nombre es Mary Crista Smith y soy la directora ejecutiva de Communities That Care Summit County. Y somos la Coalición de Prevención para nuestra comunidad. Y una de nuestras prioridades es empoderar realmente a los adultos con información relevante y creíble sobre el uso de sustancias en los jóvenes y los impactos de eso en el cerebro en desarrollo para que ustedes, como familia, puedan tomar las mejores decisiones posibles sobre cuál es su guía para los jóvenes a su cargo. . Por eso, me complace mucho dar la bienvenida al Dr. Jason Burrow Sánchez, quien fue profesor de psicología de consejería en la Universidad de Utah. Y va a discutir con nosotros los principales marcadores biológicos sociales y biológicos del desarrollo adolescente y las implicaciones de las formas de abordar el uso y la prevención de sustancias. Así que esta noche, Jason compartirá con nosotros las tasas de prevalencia del consumo de sustancias, analizaremos el desarrollo del cerebro y los hitos en la adolescencia. Y también revise la relación entre los hitos del desarrollo y la prevención e intervención para el uso de sustancias, tendremos una pregunta y respuesta para todos los participantes al final. Pero no tienes que esperar hasta el final. Si no quiere, no dude en utilizar el icono de preguntas y respuestas en la parte inferior de la pantalla. Y puede hacer preguntas en las preguntas y respuestas. Y los monitorearemos a medida que avanzamos. También verá una función de levantar la mano y se sentirá libre durante la presentación para levantar la mano y hacer una pregunta a medida que avanzamos. No tienes que esperar todo el camino hasta el final. Así que hay un par de opciones para que ustedes, como participantes, hagan preguntas. Así que levante la mano en la parte inferior de la pantalla o coloque cosas en la función de preguntas y respuestas. Y sin más preámbulos, me gustaría entregar este seminario web al Dr. Jason Burrow Sanchez, gracias por acompañarnos. Esta noche. Estamos agradecidos de tenerte.



Dr. Jason Burrow Sánchez
Genial, gracias, Christy. Y solo quiero asegurarme de que puedas ver mi pantalla, ¿verdad? Correcto. Perfecto. Gracias. Gracias a todos por pasar la noche. Con con nosotros. Así que creo que el objetivo es durante los próximos 45 minutos, trataré de repasar algunas diapositivas e información de fondo. Y luego tendremos algo de tiempo al final para hacer algunas preguntas y respuestas si tiene algunas preguntas, etc. Y estaría encantado de responder preguntas, etc. Esta noche, hablaré sobre los aspectos sociales y biológicos de las implicaciones del desarrollo adolescente para la prevención del uso de sustancias. Soy psicólogo de formación. También soy profesor en la Universidad de Utah y tienes unos 20 años más o menos. Mi investigación se centra en el uso de sustancias en los adolescentes en el ámbito de la prevención y el ámbito del tratamiento. Entonces tengo mucha experiencia en eso. Y esta noche solo voy a presentar algunos antecedentes sobre algunas cosas en las que me equivoco en términos de cómo prevenimos el uso de sustancias en los adolescentes. Entonces, ¿cuáles son algunas de las ¿Cuáles son algunos de los factores que probablemente queramos considerar? Sin embargo, antes de hacer eso, quería informarles sobre un centro que tenemos aquí en la Universidad de Utah. Se llama Centro de Transferencia de Tecnología para la prevención de las llanuras montañosas. Está financiado por samsa, o la Administración de Servicios de Salud Mental y Abuso de Sustancias. Por lo tanto, es financiado con fondos federales, servimos a la región ocho de los EE. UU., La ventaja para usted es que todo en nuestro sitio web central es gratis. Así que hacemos muchos seminarios web como el que estoy haciendo esta noche, hacemos muchos entrenamientos y asistencia técnica, y grabamos todos esos y puedes acceder a cualquiera de los que quieras. Así que estamos en el tercer año de nuestro centro de cinco años. Estos son centros subvencionados. Básicamente, continúe y busque cosas que le interesen y utilícelas, podemos darnos algunos comentarios sobre cómo funcionan y el sitio web está allí, también puede hacer una búsqueda rápida en Google para encontrarlo. La otra cosa para mantener nuestro centro listo para hacer presentaciones como lo estoy haciendo esta noche, les pedimos que llenen un formulario de evaluación muy rápido, que les daré un código QR al final y también colocaré un enlace en la charla al final también. Es solo una especie de evaluación de lo que piensan nuestras presentaciones sobre qué tipo de gustos y demás. Bien, voy a entrar de lleno en ello. Estos son algunos datos del sexto grado, 810 y 12. A partir de los datos nítidos, es posible que esté familiarizado con que los datos nítidos se toman cada dos años en el estado de Utah desde 2003. El último año para el que tuvimos datos es 2019. Y el El año en curso estamos recopilando datos para el 2021. Solo quería señalar algunas diferencias en el uso de sustancias y también señalar cuáles son las sustancias más prevalentes utilizadas por los estudiantes en esos grados. Entonces, como puede ver en el lado izquierdo, aquí están los datos de South 2017 y luego el siguiente conjunto de datos es 2019. Y 2017. El alcohol fue la sustancia de uso principal básicamente en términos de frecuencia que cambia en 2019. Y qué cigarrillos electrónicos es tan probable Si trabaja con nosotros como yo, probablemente piense que el alcohol, los cigarrillos electrónicos y la marihuana o el cannabis son las sustancias que más se consumen. Esas son las cosas más comunes que probablemente verá. Sé que escuchamos mucho sobre medicamentos recetados y medicamentos recetados que son sustancias malas. Por supuesto, debido a la amenaza de sobredosis, etc. Pero no son los más utilizados al menos por los adolescentes o al menos por los jóvenes en estos estos grados. La otra cosa que quería señalar son las diferencias entre las barras aquí, el azul más oscuro es de por vida. Sí. Entonces, básicamente, consideramos ese uso experimental o cómo usar la sustancia en su vida. Y luego 30 días de uso que consideramos uso regular. Por lo tanto, si alguien ha consumido la sustancia en los últimos 30 días, lo consideramos un uso regular. Entonces, si solo miramos los datos de 2019 aquí, podemos ver que aproximadamente el 18.9% de los jóvenes en el estado de Utah en estos grados, en promedio, indican que están usando cigarrillos electrónicos y aproximadamente el 10% indica que están usando en el últimos 30 días. Bien, solo para darle algunos recuentos de frecuencia y tasas de prevalencia sobre eso. Sin embargo, la otra cosa que me gustaría señalar es que, debido a que estas tasas son promedios, cuando realmente miras calificaciones específicas, pueden verse un poco diferentes. Entonces, como dije antes, en esta diapositiva, básicamente el 910 por ciento de ustedes lo están usando en los últimos 30 días, y así, pero cuando miran, realmente depende de la calificación que estén viendo. Entonces, si está mirando a los estudiantes de décimo grado, es aproximadamente 13.6, si está mirando a los estudiantes de 12 ° grado, es aproximadamente 15.9. Entonces cambia. Depende de cómo mires las estadísticas y de lo que te digan. Pero el panorama general aquí, de lo que realmente me gusta hablar es ¿cómo estás? ¿Cuáles son las diferencias entre los jóvenes que consumen sustancias y los que no las consumen? Entonces, si volvemos a los datos que acabamos de ver en términos de cigarrillos electrónicos, básicamente, indicaron en los últimos 30 días, alrededor del 90% de los jóvenes en realidad no están usando cigarrillos electrónicos, al menos lo indican, pero alrededor de 10 % de ustedes están en el estado de Utah. Bueno. Entonces, en lo que me gusta pensar es en lo que diferencia a los jóvenes de la parte verde del triángulo, por así decirlo, y la parte amarilla del triángulo? Y de eso se tratará realmente nuestra conversación esta noche, en términos de ¿cuáles son algunas de las cosas en las que podemos pensar? ¿Y desde una perspectiva social o conductual? ¿Y también una perspectiva biológica? ¿Y cómo unimos esas cosas para descubrir quién termina en una parte del triángulo u otra? Entonces, ¿cuáles son las cosas que son factores de riesgo para nosotros? ¿Y cuáles son las cosas que son nuestros factores de protección o las cosas que nos protegen? Bueno. Entonces, comenzaré con los factores de riesgo y protección y, en realidad, estos son aspectos sociales y conductuales de las cosas que básicamente ponen a los niños en riesgo o los protegen de ciertos comportamientos. Así que hoy, vamos a hablar sobre el uso de sustancias para esto, esto podría ser un comportamiento, esto podría ser un capítulo, esto podría ser un comportamiento problemático, esto podría ser un comportamiento violento, solo depende que el uso de sustancias no ocurra en una aspiradora. Se agrupa con otros comportamientos, pero esta noche, solo hablaremos sobre el uso de sustancias. Entonces, si pensamos en un riesgo específico por el uso de sustancias, un riesgo puede ser algo como la disponibilidad. Entonces, cuando las sustancias están más disponibles en una comunidad comunitaria, es más probable que se consuman. Así que lo consideramos un factor de riesgo. Y luego pensamos que la idea es que si hay un factor de riesgo involucrado, eso conduce a una mayor tasa de uso de sustancias, por lo que en las comunidades donde las sustancias están más disponibles, es más probable que estén acostumbrados a la idea. Entonces ese sería el resultado. Sin embargo, la otra cosa que sabemos es que existen factores protectores, ¿no? Entonces, factor de protección, tal vez algo así como el lugar donde puede estar en un entorno con una disponibilidad de sustancias tan alta o más alta. Pero, sin embargo, tienen una percepción de riesgo de usar eso. Entonces ellos no piensan bien en sí mismos, si uso esto, esto no es realmente bueno para mí, a eso lo llamamos percepción de riesgo y en la literatura, y así sucesivamente. Y ese es un factor protector. De modo que ese factor protector realmente puede intervenir entre el riesgo y el resultado. Y esa es la idea. Entonces, en la siguiente diapositiva, hablaremos de algunos factores de riesgo y protección más específicos, pero solo quería brindarles esa relación en torno a cómo interactúan esas tres cosas. Por lo tanto, algunos factores de riesgo de los que probablemente ya esté consciente son cosas del tipo individual y los dominios de los pares son cosas como el uso temprano de sustancias, la adolescencia más temprana o comienza a usar sustancias, desafortunadamente, eso predice más adelante, son va a seguir consumiendo sustancias. Algunos otros que quiero señalar, sé que hay un número en esta lista, no voy a revisarlos todos. Pero la otra que quiero señalar son las actitudes favorables hacia las sustancias, que es la tercera a la baja. Si los adolescentes tienen actitudes favorables hacia las sustancias, o están cerca de otras personas que tienen actitudes favorables hacia las sustancias, es más probable que las consuman. Otro que quiero señalar es el uso puro de sustancias, que es, creo, el quinto y el uso de píldoras de sustancias. Y muchos de estos estudios correlacionan comportamientos. Entonces no es una acción causal, pero es una correlación. Entonces, si estás cerca de otros jóvenes que consumen sustancias, ¿es probable que las uses en términos de una relación correlacional? Y encontramos que, lamentablemente, uno de los mejores predictores, por lo que el mal uso de sustancias es uno de los mejores predictores de si un adolescente está consumiendo sustancia. Permítanme decirlo de otra manera, si se juntan con compañeros que estaban usando sustancias, es muy probable que también lo hagan. Algunos de los factores familiares que también suelen salir en la literatura de los que hablamos más que otros. No voy a pasar por todos estos, pero algunos de los que solo quiero resaltar son las actitudes favorables de los padres hacia el uso de sustancias. Si se burla de sus compañeros, familiares o hermanos mayores, que tienen actitudes favorables o de sus padres hacia las sustancias, la influencia tiende a influir también en su consumo de sustancias, pero también en un antecedentes familiares de uso de sustancias, que desafortunadamente, si el joven está en una familia donde el uso de sustancias es la norma o común, entonces es más probable que también consuman sustancias. Algunos de estos factores de riesgo no los podemos controlar necesariamente. Pero podemos pensar en cómo podemos modificarlos o amortiguarlos mediante el uso de factores protectores, que es a lo que voy a ir en la siguiente diapositiva. Entonces, los factores protectores, uno que realmente quiero señalar, sé que hay varios a nivel individual, pero lo que realmente quiero señalar es este principal aquí, la competencia socioemocional, conductual, cognitiva y moral. Entonces, ¿qué significa eso? Básicamente, vamos a hablar mucho sobre eso esta noche, realmente pienso en cómo los jóvenes toman decisiones, cómo resuelven problemas, cómo se establecen límites para sí mismos y cómo tienen un sentido de sí mismos y cómo operan en sus entornos, si tienen un buen sentido de poder hacer aquellas cosas que resultaron mejores resultados, no solo para el uso de sustancias, o para muchas cosas porque sabemos que el uso de sustancias no ocurre en un vacío, pero se agrupa con otro tipo de problemas de comportamiento, por así decirlo. Otro que quiero señalar es que, al menos a nivel familiar, escolar y comunitario, es la vinculación. Es el tercero abajo. Y sabemos que los tres tipos más sociales de agentes socializadores predominantes para los jóvenes son los compañeros, la familia y la escuela. Y la idea es que si los jóvenes tienen vínculos o vínculos, al menos en una de esas áreas, es más probable que obtengan mejores resultados que si no tienen vínculos o vínculos, en ninguna de esas áreas. Por supuesto, queremos tener cuerpo a la conexión a las tres de esas áreas son posibles. Pero esa puede o no ser siempre la realidad para algún uso. Bien, entonces factores de riesgo y de protección. Sé que probablemente hablas mucho sobre estos. Así que no voy a insistir demasiado en estos puntos. Entonces, lo que quiero pasar a continuación es el desarrollo del cerebro de los adolescentes. Y muchas veces, cuando hacemos estas charlas, no hablamos lo suficiente sobre el desarrollo del cerebro de los adolescentes, pasamos más tiempo hablando de los aspectos sociales, o conductuales, cuáles serán, en los que caen los factores de riesgo de protección. Pero lo que pasa con el desarrollo del cerebro de los adolescentes es ¿por qué es tan importante? Bueno, hablaremos sobre por qué es parte de la razón por la que es importante porque la neurociencia realmente ha puesto el desarrollo del cerebro de los adolescentes en los últimos 25 años en el espacio público. Así que la gente no sabe más sobre el desarrollo del cerebro de los adolescentes ahora que nunca, en términos de una de las cosas que se conoce comúnmente es que el cerebro no se desarrolla por completo hasta los 20 años, en promedio. ¿Y qué queremos decir con eso? Hablaremos de eso más específicamente. Pero lo que realmente queremos decir con eso es la parte frontal del cerebro o la parte superior del cerebro, más bien, esta corteza prefrontal. Y luego otra diapositiva, lo examinaré más en términos de cómo se ve. Además, sabemos por el desarrollo del cerebro que el cerebro está estructurado en sus diferentes regiones. Entonces, cada región tiene una cosa o función específica que hace. Pero también existe una interconexión entre el cerebro, justo entre las partes del cerebro, etc. Y también sabemos que el cerebro se desarrolla de abajo hacia arriba y de atrás hacia adelante. ¿Y a qué nos referimos con el desarrollo del cerebro? ¿Qué pasa si el cerebro se agranda? ¿Qué es lo que está pasando? Básicamente, en pocas palabras, no, no tengo diapositivas, esta noche es el momento de ilustrar el siguiente punto porque lo que significa son las neuronas, la conexión entre las neuronas en el cerebro se vuelve más profunda. Y así, a lo largo del tiempo, el cerebro está aprendiendo cosas. Es un órgano muy, muy especializado, pero también es un órgano muy eficiente. Entonces, a medida que aprende cosas, establece conexiones entre las neuronas. Y como no cumple con las cosas en esas conexiones, hay alrededor de 100 mil millones de neuronas cuando nacemos, la mayoría de ellas se quedan con nosotros. Y esas cosas se vuelven más especializadas a lo largo del tiempo. Está bien, así que saltemos en las partes principales del cerebro. La parte inferior del cerebro, que está aquí, es el tipo de la primera parte del cerebro que tiene, ya sabes, conexiones importantes, etc. Esto está realmente en línea cuando nacemos, y así sucesivamente. Esto nos ayuda con cosas en las que realmente no pensamos mucho, como los procesos autónomos, como la respiración, la presión arterial, la digestión, eso es bueno, porque cuando somos jóvenes, no queremos tener que pensar en ellos. muchas cosas. Y la parte media del cerebro, que es el cerebro llamado área límbica, también llamamos parte emocional del cerebro, es la parte del cerebro que comienza a conectarse durante la adolescencia, o la pubertad, por así decirlo, y tres estructuras que me gusta señalar que la parte media del cerebro se llama amígdala. Y si alguna vez escuchaste la respuesta de lucha o huida que hacen que la dilla esté realmente relacionada con esa respuesta, el hipocampo, que está conectado para formar nuevos recuerdos, y también el hipotálamo, que está conectado con las hormonas y la liberación de hormonas, y las hormonas reguladoras. Entonces, si trabaja con adolescentes, no es así, sabe que las hormonas pueden estar por todas partes, o la observación de ellas en términos de estados de ánimo, etc. Y parte de la razón es que el cerebro está aprendiendo a regularse emocionalmente durante la adolescencia. Y esa es una de las cosas que se supone que debe detener la parte media del cerebro. La última parte del cerebro en desarrollarse, como mencionamos en la diapositiva anterior, es la corteza prefrontal, que sabemos que no se desarrolla por completo en promedio hasta que una persona tiene 20 años aproximadamente. Entonces, si lo piensas bien, una de las teorías es que se llama teoría del déficit. Y la idea es que esta parte del cerebro no está completamente desarrollada. Entonces, una persona a mediados de los 20, esta parte media del cerebro realmente cobra vida y se desarrolla durante la adolescencia. Entonces, si lo piensas, de esa manera, la parte emocional del cerebro o el área límbica, parte del cerebro se desarrolla completamente durante las lecciones, la parte superior del cerebro no es otra. Otra forma de pensar en esto es que tienes un motor Ferrari en el medio aquí, y tienes los frenos, tal vez tienes un híbrido, por así decirlo, en realidad la adolescencia me dijo esa connotación de cómo piensan ellos. eso. De acuerdo, pero lo principal es pensar aquí si hay diferentes partes del cerebro y se están desarrollando en diferentes momentos a lo largo del desarrollo, creo que esa es una de las principales cosas que hemos aprendido de la neurociencia en los últimos 25 años. . La otra cosa que realmente quiero señalar es que lo que acabo de decir se basa en promedios, como el adolescente promedio, y así sucesivamente. Existe una increíble variabilidad individual. Entonces, si miras el eje aquí, esta es la edad. Entonces, este es alguien que tiene cinco años, y al final, el eje x es alguien que tiene 35 años, de cero aquí a cinco aquí, todo esto significa que hay más control para una mejor toma de decisiones, básicamente, a medida que asciende en la escala. Y entonces puede ver esta curva aquí, que es un promedio, correcto, pero los puntos individuales aquí representan puntajes individuales. Entonces, lo que realmente estoy tratando de señalar es que, a pesar de que decimos que la parte superior del cerebro no se desarrolla completamente, y la parte media del cerebro, o hasta que una persona tiene 20 años, y la parte media del cerebro se desarrolla, y en algún momento de la adolescencia, hay variabilidad individual. Entonces te cruzarás con claridad, te encontrarás con adolescentes, que tienen 15 años, que toman mejores decisiones, los de 25, etc. Y eso es parte de esa variabilidad individual. Bien, una de las otras cosas que me gustaría señalar es uno de los marcadores, una especie de marcador de comportamiento social, pero también biológico, de la adolescencia es la pubertad. ¿Y cómo se relaciona eso y vamos a tratar de vincular esto con el desarrollo del cerebro, algo así como lo que estamos hablando de la pubertad? La edad promedio de la pubertad actualmente es de unos 12 años. Ahora, la edad promedio de la pubertad hace unos 100 años era alrededor de los 17. Así que era más viejo, más joven, hay algunas teorías de que algunos lo están, en países en desarrollo o países desarrollados, hay acceso a mejores alimentos, o hay más hormonas de crecimiento y alimentos, no hay ninguna conclusión al respecto. Pero esas son algunas de las teorías, etc. Entonces, pero lo que realmente quiero que pienses es en términos de pubertad, cuáles son las expectativas para la adolescencia. Entonces, algunas culturas celebran la pubertad a los 13 años. Cierto, tienen celebraciones para eso, o los 15 años y el final, y cuando presento estas cosas, generalmente le pregunto a la audiencia, ¿cuáles son algunas de las cosas que observamos? ¿O cuáles son algunas de nuestras expectativas en torno a la pubertad? Para la adolescencia, ¿cuándo los vemos atravesar estos cambios? ¿Cuáles son las expectativas típicamente, la gente de la audiencia? Cuéntame si hay expectativas de cambios de comportamiento, hay alguna idea o hay alguna norma o hay alguna forma en que podemos visualizar que a medida que los adolescentes atraviesan la pubertad, las expectativas de lo que lo que vas a hacer es ser más como pequeños adultos que como niños, ¿verdad? Hay algunas transiciones que tienen lugar. Entonces, en realidad, lo que estoy tratando de señalar es que existe cierta expectativa de que el comportamiento cambia y se vuelve más maduro cuando ocurre la pubertad. Pero la realidad es que lo que sabemos del desarrollo del cerebro es que el cerebro no necesariamente no se está desarrollando de esa manera. En términos de ¿qué pasa si volvemos a una de las últimas partes del cerebro en desarrollarse es la corteza prefrontal donde estás tomando tus decisiones? ¿Estás haciendo tu pensamiento planificado, consecuente, etc.? ¿Por qué esperaríamos que la pubertad sea realmente un indicador de cuándo deberíamos esperar comportamientos diferentes? Lo que realmente está ocurriendo desde una perspectiva biológica es que la parte media del cerebro se está conectando, ¿verdad? Las hormonas, la regulación emocional, el funcionamiento emocional, etc. Aprender a regular realmente a los que están dentro de su entorno. Bueno. La otra cosa que realmente me gusta señalar es que nuestros marcadores basados ​​en la edad, y encontré el lado izquierdo, las edades son una especie de edades cronológicas. Y luego del lado derecho están los marcadores. Entonces, a los 13 años, sí, consideramos que un joven es un adolescente, pero ¿qué significa eso realmente? ¿Basado en lo que acabamos de aprender sobre el desarrollo del cerebro? ¿Debería tener 13 años? Ya sabes, no lo sé, generalmente desde una perspectiva de comportamiento, o las expectativas cambian. Pero si realmente pensamos en el desarrollo del cerebro de los adolescentes, ¿debería tener licencia de conducir a los 16 años, verdad? los adolescentes pueden conducir, pero sabemos que las compañías de seguros cobran mucho más por los seguros para adolescentes, las compañías de alquiler de autos, no se pueden alquilar autos, son 25. Lo hacen porque conocen los promedios, en términos de obtener en un accidente son mayores para la adolescencia. Entonces, desde la perspectiva del cerebro, probablemente 16 años no sea una buena edad para no decirle a la adolescencia que no le diga que conducir no es una gran idea. A los 16 años después de votar, puede unirse al ejército, y así sucesivamente. Una vez más, eso es genial. Por lo general, estas cosas se basan en la legislación y las normas sociales no se basan necesariamente en el desarrollo del cerebro de los adolescentes. Lo mismo ocurre con el uso de productos de tabaco. ¿Cómo decidimos que 18 o 21 es la edad adecuada para consumir productos de tabaco? ¿O consumir alcohol? ¿Cómo decidimos? 21 es la edad adecuada. Ella está fuera De modo que lo que estoy tratando de sacar aquí son algunas de nuestras normas sociales, o nuestras normas legislativas no se basan en la ciencia, per se. Se basan en alguna idea, el por qué cuando deberíamos hacer las cosas húmedas. Y no siempre se conectan con lo que sabemos ahora sobre el cerebro. Bien, una de las otras cosas que me gusta señalar, y esta es una buena diapositiva nueva. Y la buena noticia es que, en general, la mayoría de los adolescentes son bastante buenos en la toma de decisiones, aunque sabemos que el cerebro se desarrolla en diferentes momentos a lo largo del tiempo durante la adolescencia. Y nuevamente, en promedio, la corteza prefrontal no está completamente desarrollada hasta Merces, la persona a mediados de los 20 años. Entonces, cuando han realizado estudios que analizan a los jóvenes y cómo toman decisiones, y en esto, este estudio aquí, que cito aquí no es de un estudio de caso de uso de sustancias, es solo de una tarea de toma de decisiones, y así sucesivamente. Entonces, lo que solo quiero señalar es la línea oscura aquí, la línea negra, básicamente indica que a medida que los jóvenes envejecen, esto está disminuyendo, y lo que significa es que están disminuyendo y la propensión a tomar decisiones arriesgadas. . Y lo que esto significa es que cuando se conocen los riesgos, los adolescentes tienden a tomar decisiones menos riesgosas a medida que envejecen. Bueno. El otro, la línea azul aquí es ambigua. Entonces, cuando los riesgos son ambiguos, tiende a alcanzar su punto máximo alrededor de los 16 a 20. Y luego tiende a disminuir. Entonces, incluso cuando los adolescentes son ambiguos sobre el riesgo de tomar una decisión en particular, tiende a disminuir con el tiempo. Hay un subconjunto de la adolescencia, y este es un tipo más pequeño de, subconjunto de adolescentes y donde la línea roja aquí, y estos adolescentes, generalmente podemos decir desde una edad más temprana, porque exhibieron, exhiben varios comportamientos, como consumir sustancias en una edad más joven u otros comportamientos problemáticos que surgen de las escuelas, etc., etc. Y hay un gráfico aquí o está el gráfico aquí, que indica que tienden a alcanzar su punto máximo en 12 y 14, por lo que su capacidad para tomar decisiones más riesgosas. Y a estos jóvenes los llamamos insensibles a conocer los riesgos o no, realmente no importa. Y a veces los llamamos jóvenes impulsivos, vernáculos comunes, etc., que tienden a distinguir antes. Muchas veces, cuando trabajamos con jóvenes, nos encontramos teniendo más problemas antes, estos tienden a ser estos jóvenes en números rojos, y es un subconjunto más pequeño de nosotros. Así que volvemos a nuestro triángulo, este es probablemente el 10% de ustedes, que en realidad está usando sustancias al principio o tiene más riesgo de hacerlo. La otra cosa que realmente quiero señalar, en general de esta diapositiva, es que cuando conoce los riesgos de tomar ciertas decisiones, tienden a tomar decisiones menos riesgosas. Y esos puntos serán importantes a medida que seguimos avanzando en esta conversación. Bien, entonces vamos a volver al cerebro. Así que estamos yendo y viniendo entre algunos aspectos del comportamiento social y luego algunos aspectos biológicos. Y quería señalar qué tipo de sucede realmente con el, con el cerebro en términos de cuándo se introducen las sustancias. Entonces, lo interesante de las sustancias, si no tuviéramos sustancias en el medio ambiente, nunca tendríamos que hablar de esto per se, ¿verdad? Pero lo hacemos. Y luego las sustancias nos atrapan y hay una conexión, y hay una interacción con la forma en que operan dentro del cerebro. Y realmente lo que hacen con el cerebro es cambiar el equilibrio químico de lo que sucede en el cerebro. Y una de las cosas a las que realmente prestamos atención en términos de la literatura de investigación y demás es cómo las sustancias influyen en lo que llamamos la vía de la recompensa. Y para que puedan ver esta diapositiva aquí, la vía de recompensa de activación por drogas adictivas, pueden ver mucho cuando quitamos eso, pueden ver varias drogas, aquí está la heroína, aquí está el alcohol, aquí está la cocaína, para que pueda desgarrar y romper cuando de nuevo, nicotina. Entonces, lo que puede ver aquí son las vías de recompensa activadas por ciertas y estas no son, esta lista de sustancias no es exhaustiva de ninguna manera. Pero todas son sustancias que se utilizan reaccionan de manera muy similar a través de esta vía de recompensa. Y entonces puede ver que las sustancias reaccionan directa o indirectamente, en el caso del alcohol aquí en esta vía de recompensa. ¿Así que lo que pasa? Entonces, básicamente, solo desde cuando no estamos hablando de sustancias, cada vez que experimentamos cosas, algo que es placentero, como comemos comida, tenemos sexo, tenemos somos, somos nutridos de alguna manera, cosas que experimentamos como agradable. Lo que sucede en la vía de recompensa es que se libera dopamina. ¿Okey? Y la dopamina se libera en estas dos áreas. Aquí, uno se llama el área tegmental ventral, y no necesita saber que en el BTA el núcleo accumbens, y luego aquí arriba, está conectado a la corteza prefrontal. A medida que se libera la dopamina, le dice al cerebro que me gusta, siga haciéndolo. Entonces, para comer, me gustaría esto, seguir haciéndolo hasta que el mecanismo en tu cuerpo diga que estoy saciado, y eso es suficiente. Ya no tienes que comer, etcétera. Y esas son cosas buenas porque son cosas que queremos que sucedan. Bueno, resulta que cuando se introducen sustancias en el cerebro, imitan esa acción. Entonces también liberan dopamina. Es el camino de la recompensa. Entonces, lo que hacen las sustancias es imitar la acción que hacen los reforzadores naturales en el medio ambiente. Sin embargo, el problema con eso es que las drogas o sustancias también pueden imitar la respuesta del cuerpo al estrés. Entonces, a medida que se libera dopamina, lo que también se libera es una cosa llamada cortisol. Bien, recuerde lo que hablé sobre la parte media del cerebro y la parte media del cerebro, especialmente la amígdala, la respuesta de lucha o huida, etc. Una de las cosas que sucede cuando tenemos la respuesta de lucha o huida, libera algunas sustancias químicas en el cerebro, con el hipotálamo, y una de las sustancias químicas que se liberan se llama cortisol. Y somos cortisol, es bueno, es un buen químico, aumenta nuestra adrenalina, etc. Una de las cosas que hace en términos de impactar el cerebro, también ralentiza la corteza prefrontal. Eso es bueno, porque es una especie de respuesta de lucha o huida. Por ejemplo, si tenemos que pensar en las cosas demasiado tiempo, eso no es bueno para nosotros. Entonces, si ponemos nuestra mano sobre una estufa caliente, e inmediatamente la retiramos, esa es una especie de respuesta de lucha o huida, inacción. Y lo que está sucediendo es muy rápido, está arrojando cortisol, y está diciendo, parte frontal del cerebro o parte superior del cerebro donde tomamos decisiones, quiero que disminuyas la velocidad, no quiero que lo hagas. Piense en esto demasiado tiempo, solo quiero que retire su mano. Porque si lo atascamos, si lo pensamos demasiado y mantenemos la mano en el mechero, nos quemaríamos, cierto y más de lo que probablemente escribimos, ya lo hemos hecho. Pero lo que sucede son sustancias que consumen jóvenes y adultos, que también imitan la interacción entre la dopamina y la vía de recompensa. Entonces, a medida que se libera la dopamina, también se liberan sustancias químicas como el cortisol, que ralentizan la corteza prefrontal. Entonces, aunque el cerebro dice que me gusta esto, me gusta esto, hago más, hago más, hago más. Nuestra capacidad para tomar decisiones y emitir juicios en realidad suena mal. Entonces, cuando alguien está bajo la influencia de sustancias particulares, una de las cosas que está viendo es una capacidad reducida para tomar decisiones, porque de hecho, la corteza prefrontal se está ralentizando. Esa también es una de las preocupaciones del desarrollo de los adolescentes. Cuando hablamos de cómo se interrumpe el cerebro a lo largo de la adolescencia, el uso constante de varias sustancias es una de las cosas que creemos que no sabemos con certeza, es que la corteza prefrontal o esta parte superior del cerebro se interrumpe. Y su capacidad para hacer conexiones, porque en realidad debido a que cosas como el cortisol y otras cosas son empujadas al cerebro, estos son químicos, que ralentiza la capacidad de hacer estas conexiones a lo largo del tiempo, que es algo que realmente queremos. ha sucedido. Queremos que esta parte superior del cerebro se fortalezca a través de la experiencia, al tomar decisiones difíciles, etc. Porque así es como sabemos en términos de cómo se conectan las neuronas, cómo tomamos decisiones o cómo aprendemos el comportamiento, a través de acciones repetitivas, etc. Y eso es lo que realmente queremos que suceda. Pero si las sustancias if ralentizan ese proceso, la disponibilidad o la oportunidad de que eso suceda, también se ralentiza. Déjame darte otro ejemplo. Mirando, estos son solo mis círculos aquí. Entonces, la parte verde del cerebro, o la parte verde aquí, es solo la parte superior de la vía de recompensa para la corteza prefrontal del cerebro. Así que ya hemos hablado de esas algunas diapositivas. Pero esta es otra diapositiva, esta diapositiva en particular es en realidad refiriéndose a su dopamina, de la que acabo de hablar, que es uno de los neurotransmisores en el cerebro, y uno de los que está bastante bien estudiado. Esto se refiere a la cocaína. Pero nuevamente, todas las sustancias que se usan reaccionan de manera muy similar. Pero lo que está diciendo aquí es que les pertenece esta parte media del cerebro que acabo de señalar. Así que esto es lo que hablé sobre el área tegmental ventral, que es esa parte del núcleo accumbens, y luego la corteza prefrontal y estas cosas interactúan juntas. Y qué sucede cuando hacemos cosas como comer, y esa vía de recompensa, la dopamina se libera, y eso es bueno. Y le dice a nuestro cerebro, ya sabes, haz esto de nuevo, ¿haz el escaneo? Bueno, desafortunadamente, lo que sucede con determinadas drogas que se usan o abusan o abusan es que la dopamina se libera en una cantidad exagerada. Entonces pueden ver esto aquí, y este es un ejemplo de cocaína. Y lo que creemos que es uno de los problemas con eso es que obtiene cantidades reducidas y exageradas en términos de la vía de recompensa del ternero. Y en realidad cambia la influencia o el mecanismo de cómo se libera en el cerebro en términos de la vía de recompensa, pero también se procesa una casa. Y una de las dos cosas por las que eso realmente se vuelve problemático es una, si ha trabajado con personas que consumen sustancias durante un largo período de tiempo, por lo general tienden a necesitar más sustancia para obtener el mismo placer y la misma cantidad. de placer. Eso se llama tolerancia. Y ahí es donde parte de lo que creemos que está sucediendo aquí es que la droga necesita tener niveles más altos a lo largo del tiempo para experimentar ese mismo nivel de placer. Y luego, si se quita la sustancia, esencialmente lo que sucede es que la dopamina disminuye dentro de la corteza prefrontal, lo siento, la vía de recompensa y llamamos a que se retire en el sentido de que el cuerpo reacciona a eso y dice, yo no así quiero más dopamina, que, ya sabes, los niveles que tenía antes y así sucesivamente. Entonces, una de las preguntas que siempre me hacen es, si las drogas no se usan durante un período de tiempo, ¿este mecanismo volverá a ser lo que era antes? Y esa es una de las cosas que no sabemos. Entonces, si ha trabajado con personas que consumen sustancias durante largos períodos de tiempo, algunas de las cosas que sí le dicen es que no puedo experimentar la alegría de la forma en que lo he hecho en el pasado. O no lo experimento de la misma manera, etcétera. Y lo que pensamos desde una perspectiva biológica es que es esta relación o este mecanismo de cómo se libera la dopamina, y la vía de recompensa cambia. Está bien, pero no sabemos, la cosa es que no sabemos cuánto tiempo lleva eso, cuánta sustancia toma y cuántos años toma, por así decirlo. De acuerdo, porque eso es solo una especie de descripción general simple del desarrollo del cerebro, y así sucesivamente. Y ahora quiero hablar de algunas cosas que están relacionadas. Así que, como llevar esta imagen a casa, los adolescentes se arriesgan a asumir la impulsividad y el control cognitivo, porque cuando hablamos de los adolescentes que asumen riesgos, anticipamos que ocurrirá durante la adolescencia. Y cuando volvemos a pensar en esa parte media del cerebro, especialmente en la vía de recompensa con el área tegmental ventral y el núcleo accumbens, esas son dos estructuras que están realmente relacionadas con la toma de riesgos de los adolescentes. Y a medida que esas cosas se ponen en línea, durante el período de desarrollo de la adolescencia, en realidad esperamos que los adolescentes asuman más riesgos, se involucren en más conductas de búsqueda de sensaciones. Y de hecho, cuando estudiamos esto, a lo largo del tiempo, sabemos que la adolescencia, solo datos de observación, sabemos que los adolescentes toman comportamientos más riesgosos que los jóvenes más jóvenes, o que los jóvenes mayores sí muestran cuando les mostré esas curvas en otro gráfico, en general, tienden a alcanzar su punto máximo, ya sabes, entre los 16 y los 18 años. Pero los adolescentes, en general, corren más riesgos, pero anticipamos eso solo por el tipo de desarrollo cerebral típico. La otra cosa que sabemos es que la impulsividad se correlaciona con la toma de riesgos. Entonces, esto es cuando no piensas en un comportamiento específico, y así sucesivamente. Y creemos que parte de la razón por la que esto ocurre se debe a que la parte media del cerebro realmente se conecta durante la adolescencia. Y esa parte superior del cerebro no está completamente en línea. Entonces, el cerebro se ajusta a cómo tomo decisiones, ¿verdad? ¿Cómo puedo retrasar las consecuencias? ¿Derecha? ¿Cómo hago si quiero obtener una recompensa realmente rápido? Bueno, ¿cómo evito otras consecuencias, en las que puede pensar, como la toma de decisiones planificada, el pensamiento consecuente, etc.? ¿Y cómo funciona? Y si no lo hace, si trabaja con adolescentes, sabe que eso es a veces con lo que ellos luchan, en términos de cómo tomar decisiones y cómo hacer las cosas, cómo postergar ciertas recompensas, cómo tener un plazo más largo. resultados, y así sucesivamente. Pero si lo pensamos desde una perspectiva biológica, y desde una perspectiva de observación, en términos de lo que realmente hacen, anticipamos que eso sucederá. El problema es cuando introducimos sustancias, y así sucesivamente, como les mostré a través de la vía de recompensa, en realidad, se ensucia ese proceso. Por lo que ralentiza la corteza prefrontal. Y hace que sea aún más difícil, más desafiante tomar buenas decisiones. lo que nos lleva a nuestro siguiente punto, que es el control cognitivo, esto es lo que realmente queremos que hagan los adolescentes, creo, es que tomen buenas decisiones tengan un pensamiento consecuente de lo bueno y habilidades de resolución de problemas, porque sabemos lo que los adolescentes tienen estas cosas, ellos pueden tener mejores resultados, no solo en el uso de sustancias, sino en una gran cantidad de resultados en la vida en términos de lo que hacen. Entonces, realmente, ¿qué nos dice el cuando unimos el comportamiento social y el desarrollo del cerebro? Nos dice cuáles son algunas de las cosas en las que deberíamos trabajar con los adolescentes. Entonces, si sabemos que la parte media del cerebro se conecta prácticamente durante la adolescencia, pero esa parte superior del cerebro no está completamente en línea. Entonces, enseñar cosas como la toma de decisiones y las habilidades para resolver problemas, y la capacidad de regulación emocional son probablemente cosas bastante buenas que podríamos estar enseñando a los adolescentes, especialmente si queremos mejorar y desarrollar esa corteza prefrontal. Y somos desde una perspectiva biológica realmente fundamental, realmente está haciendo esas conexiones, esas conexiones neuronales en la parte superior del cerebro. Bien, principios de prevención y demás. Algunas cosas con las que quiero resumir todo esto o unir esto es una, bueno, tengo un número aquí. Pero aquí está el primero, la prevención es importante. Es importante prevenir el consumo de sustancias en primer lugar. Entonces, para evitar que los jóvenes lleguen a la parte amarilla del triángulo, ¿verdad? Mantenlos en la parte verde del triángulo. O si llegan a la parte antigua del triángulo, ¿cómo hacemos para que regresen a la parte verde del triángulo? Entonces, ¿cómo evitamos que algo empeore? La prevención correcta en la primera parte es solo una especie de prevención primaria, probablemente algo que deberíamos estar haciendo de todos modos. Entonces, ¿cómo pensamos en los siguientes puntos aquí? ¿Cómo lo hacemos? Una de las formas es ser realmente honesto al enseñar, enseñar a los jóvenes sobre los cambios en el cerebro, el cuerpo. Sabemos que hay períodos de crecimiento del desarrollo. Sabemos que existen los hechos. Sobre las sustancias en el cerebro y el cuerpo, sabemos que sabemos más ahora que nunca. Y sabremos más, ya sabes, dentro de cinco años que nunca. Entonces, la idea es que no hay razón para que esto no sea un misterio que no deba ocultarse. Una forma en la que he trabajado con adolescentes y grupos focales y les he preguntado: ¿Qué cosas quieren saber? El número uno en su lista es qué sustancias le hacen al cerebro en su cuerpo. Quieren saber cuáles son algunos de los riesgos si uso estas sustancias en particular, si miramos hacia atrás al tipo de gráfico de literatura de toma de decisiones de resolución de problemas que les mostré, sabemos que los adolescentes toman mejores decisiones cuando tienen más precisión. información. Si no les da esa información, es muy difícil para ellos tomar mejores decisiones. La mayoría de los adolescentes con los que he trabajado pasarán más tiempo investigando su próxima compra de iPhone, luego investigarán la próxima sustancia que pondrán en su cuerpo. Está bien, pero la próxima sustancia que pongan en su cuerpo puede tener un impacto mayor que su próximo iPhone. Otra cosa que sabemos, por solo pensar en el desarrollo del cerebro adolescente, la parte media del cerebro se está conectando, esa área límbica o parte emocional del cerebro, por así decirlo. Así que no hay nada de malo en enseñar la regulación emocional, en conjunto con enseñar cómo tomar decisiones en torno a eso. Y sabemos, desde una perspectiva biológica, o desde la perspectiva del desarrollo del cerebro adolescente, que probablemente será algo muy importante de enseñar durante la adolescencia. Una de las cosas de las que siempre hablo cuando trabajo en las escuelas es Desafortunadamente, no dedicamos tiempo a enseñar estas cosas directamente, generalmente lo hacemos de manera indirecta. Entonces, básicamente, si lo hacemos si enseñamos sobre lo que enseñamos conceptos como resolución de problemas, generalmente es más indirecto. Entonces, en una clase de álgebra, tal vez enseñemos cómo resolver para x. Pero, ¿cómo no resuelve Alesund para x cuando ofrecieron sustancias en una fiesta? ¿Derecha? ¿Enseñamos eso explícitamente, y la mayoría de las veces no lo hacemos? Y la enseñanza también enseña más específicamente sobre la resolución de problemas y las habilidades para la toma de decisiones, la comprensión de las consecuencias de las elecciones y el plan de comportamiento. Así que todas estas cosas son parte del cerebro, queremos enseñar esas cosas específicamente, no hay ninguna razón por la que no deberíamos hacerlo. Y, de hecho, sabemos que cuando los adolescentes tienen una mejor capacidad de toma de decisiones, una mejor capacidad de resolución de problemas, tienden a hacerlo mejor y en muchas áreas diferentes. Y la otra cosa que quiero dejarles aquí también, en términos de principios de prevención y principios de intervención, es enseñar realmente la influencia de la presión contextual. Para cosas como la presión de los compañeros, la publicidad en las redes sociales, ya sabes, podemos usar este ejemplo en términos de sustancias, ¿cómo influye eso en lo que hacen? Los cigarrillos electrónicos que podemos usar como ejemplo, tengo una conferencia completamente diferente que doy sobre los cigarrillos electrónicos. Desafortunadamente, los cigarrillos electrónicos son excelentes para la publicidad. Y comercializan hacia nosotros. Entonces, ¿cómo enseñamos a los jóvenes sobre las estrategias de marketing que tienen las empresas para lograr que usen sus productos o que quieran que usen sus productos? ¿Y cómo pueden superar eso, usando su parte frontal del cerebro que sabemos que está completamente desarrollada todavía, pero que en realidad podemos impactar eso al enseñar las habilidades que necesitan? Entonces, esta diapositiva es realmente para darle algunas ideas para extender una de las cosas que siempre me preguntan es, bueno, ¿qué programa debo usar? O cómo lo prevenimos, y así sucesivamente, ya sabes, realmente no me importa qué programa uses, per se, lo que quiero que uses es, es un programa o lo que sea que eso signifique, que tenga sentido para el entorno en el que estás y realmente está cumpliendo los objetivos de lo que quieres hacer. Pero diría que, lo que es más importante, cualquier programa o intervención que elijas, debería tener elementos de las viñetas aquí, debería tener algo sobre cómo prevenir estas cosas en primer lugar, enseñando sobre lo que sabemos sobre el cerebro en el cuerpo, ¿derecho? Los aspectos sociales, conductuales, biológicos, la enseñanza sobre la regulación emocional, la enseñanza sobre la resolución de problemas, las habilidades para la toma de decisiones, la influencia de la enseñanza y la presión contextual, si lo tomamos fundamentalmente, desde una perspectiva social, conductual y biológica, es como que Estas son algunas de las cosas que los adolescentes probablemente necesitarán saber para poder tomar mejores decisiones y tomar mejores decisiones, que creo que, en última instancia, eso es lo que queremos que hagan. Bueno. Entonces, como dije, al comienzo de los primeros 45 minutos más o menos, solo iba a estar yo repasando algunas diapositivas y brindando información de fondo. Creo que la siguiente parte, vamos a gastar un poco tiempo para preguntas y respuestas, estoy feliz de responder algunas preguntas sobre preguntas y respuestas. Y la otra cosa que solo quería decir es que está mi información de contacto, si usted, ya sabe, quisiera comunicarse conmigo en cualquier momento. Y la otra cosa es, dije, como dije al principio, tenemos un centro en el que podemos hacer este tipo de presentaciones. Así que puedes tomar una foto de eso con tu escáner QR en tu teléfono celular ahora mismo. Te llevará directamente a una encuesta. Es una encuesta muy rápida que usamos para nuestro centro. Y realmente te agradecería que hicieras eso, también soltar un enlace en el chat en el que puedo que puedas usar también. Lo llevaremos directamente a su navegador web. Así que les voy a dar a la gente unos segundos más para hacer eso. Pero me complacerá responder a sus preguntas o hacer lo que necesite que haga.


María Christa Smith
Así que muchas gracias. Vaya, eso fue fabuloso y lleno de información. Tenemos una sesión de preguntas y respuestas. Puede ver en la parte inferior de la pantalla que dice preguntas y respuestas. Así que siéntete libre de hacer preguntas allí. O también puede ver debajo de la derecha junto a él, tiene una función de levantar la mano. Y puede levantar la mano y lo activaremos y le permitiremos hacer su pregunta directamente. Y mientras esperamos que hagas eso, tengo una pregunta relacionada con lo que dijiste sobre la juventud, y si se les da la información sobre los impactos en el cerebro y el cuerpo, eso es, ayuda. ellos para tomar decisiones más saludables, y es una estrategia de prevención. ¿Tiene algún recurso en particular al que señale a los jóvenes para obtener esa información que les resulta convincente?



Dr. Jason Burrow Sánchez
Eso es un gran punto. Entonces, honestamente, creo que es una de las mejores cosas, así que he hecho este trabajo con jóvenes desde sexto grado. Así que he enseñado el desarrollo del cerebro a jóvenes realmente jóvenes. Y por lo general, cuando trabajas en sexto grado, se trata más de mantenerlos en su asiento. Y sabes que es un poco diferente a 12 pares y lo dices, pero entienden los conceptos. Y creo que lo principal es enseñar los conceptos fundamentales básicos de cómo funciona el cerebro, la conexión con el uso de diversas sustancias, etc. No lo tengo en esta plataforma de diapositivas. Pero tengo algunas cosas que hay un NightA, o el Instituto Nacional sobre el Abuso de Drogas tiene un gran sitio web llamado metta para adolescentes. Y tiene mucha información excelente que está dirigida a maestros, padres o equipos, que explica muchas de estas cosas. Están usando el desarrollo del cerebro, una especie de evidencia y una parte del desarrollo, para brindar realmente buenas explicaciones a los jóvenes de maneras que tengan sentido. Y lo hacen, lo hacen de diferentes maneras, desde un nivel fundamental de cómo escuchar el trabajo calificado, también a través de sustancias particulares. Aunque hice algunas generalizaciones sobre las sustancias, existen algunas diferencias y algunos matices de varias sustancias. La nicotina es algo de lo que no hablé mucho. Tengo una conferencia completamente diferente sobre eso, solo hablo de los cigarrillos electrónicos y demás. Pero la nicotina es una sustancia realmente potente, esa juventud es una de las primeras cosas que captas. Y así. Entonces, realmente creo que depende de la edad de los jóvenes con los que está trabajando, porque eso se conectará con su tipo de cognición. Ya sabes, cognitivamente dónde están. y comprensión en términos de eso. Así que los estudiantes de sexto grado, por ejemplo, ya saben, mi ejemplo los estudiantes de sexto grado controlan mejor muy diferentes. Entonces



María Christa Smith
Gracias, es muy útil saberlo. ¿Hay alguna manera de decir que es nyda?

 

Dr. Jason Burrow Sánchez
Si.

 

María Christa Smith
En el chat

 

Dr. Jason Burrow Sánchez
Equipos, pueden simplemente para que haya un abuso de drogas a nivel nacional, y de hecho pueden simplemente buscar en Google para que surjan de inmediato.

 

María Christa Smith
Gracias. ¿Alguna otra pregunta o comentario? Ahora es el momento de hacer sus preguntas candentes. Y puede levantar la mano o ponerla en las preguntas y respuestas.

 

Dr. Jason Burrow Sánchez
Así que solo compartiré algunas cosas. A veces he mantenido estas conversaciones. Y a veces los padres están en casa con sus equipos mirando la pantalla cuando coloco estas diapositivas y tienen conversaciones allí mismo. Les he pedido que me digan, algunos de los datos de prevalencia, ya sabes, o lo que sea, más que nada, espero que parte de la información que te he proporcionado para iniciar una conversación, sobre cómo hablar con los adolescentes acerca de varias sustancias o, o qué preguntas tienen realmente, creo que se trata de disipar cualquiera de los mitos y realmente utilizar información objetiva sobre lo que sabemos.



María Christa Smith
¿Ha visto alguna comunidad u organización que sienta que está haciendo este trabajo realmente bien, que podría señalar como modelo o ejemplo?

 

Dr. Jason Burrow Sánchez
Bueno, creo que sí, creo que Utah, así que trabajo en seis estados diferentes para nuestro centro. Y de hecho, diré, no tengo ninguna comunidad específica per se a la que señalaré, pero señalaré algunos estados específicos y creo que usted dice que ella lo hace bastante bien. Una de las cosas que observamos es el uso de tasas de prevalencia entre las diversas sustancias, ya sabes, las sustancias consumidas con más frecuencia por los jóvenes son cigarrillos electrónicos y desorden, cigarrillos electrónicos, alcohol y cannabis. Y también nos fijamos en uno de los factores protectores que se mide, es la percepción de riesgo. Y lo que encontramos es que existe una correlación para que los jóvenes perciban que una sustancia es más dañina para el cerebro o el cuerpo o simplemente en general para ellos. Son menos de los que puedo usar. Y de hecho, de los seis estados que seguimos desde nuestro centro en Utah, a ella le va bastante bien, en términos de eso. Así que diría que es, probablemente, se trata de una, ya sabes, tipo de estrategias en términos de una, saber que conoces a tu audiencia, que conoces a tu comunidad, que utilizas los datos que tienes para conocer tu comunidad, cuáles son las tasas de prevalencia. encontrar intervención o prevención, intervenciones preventivas, ya sabes, como quieras llamarlas, eso hace sentido para su comunidad basado en lo que realmente está tratando de abordar. Entonces, realmente diría que cuáles son las cosas que está tratando de abordar probablemente deberían ser lo primero, y luego elegir intervenciones o intervenciones preventivas que tengan sentido para abordar esas cosas. Entonces, si está tratando de concentrarse en lo que sabe, en un par de factores de riesgo diferentes o en algunos diferentes o, o resaltar o mejorar factores de protección específicos, ya sabe, entonces esas son las cosas que desea hacer. Entonces creo que cada uno, ya sabe, para bien o para mal, cada comunidad es siempre diferente, ya sabe, en términos de cómo pueden abordar las cosas y qué recursos tienen, y participación comunitaria, etc. Entonces, pero creo que, como acción estatal, Yutan, no solo estoy diciendo que en realidad, a partir de los datos, realmente necesito hacer el trabajo. Entonces


María Christa Smith
Debo decir, estoy de acuerdo con usted, tengo colegas en California y Colorado, y ellos, debido a las actitudes mucho más liberales hacia el uso de sustancias. Tienen una lucha mayor y tasas de uso mucho mayores entre ellos.

 

Dr. Jason Burrow Sánchez
Sí, tenemos estados que se comunican con nosotros en los seis estados que cubrimos. Entonces cubrimos los Estados. En nuestro centro, cubrimos los estados de Utah, Colorado, Wyoming, Montana, Dakota del Norte y del Sur. Entonces tenemos diferentes estados en nuestra área tres se llama región ocho, comuníquese con nosotros y pregúntenos sobre, ¿saben, cómo íbamos a reestructurar nuestros esfuerzos de prevención? ¿Qué debemos hacer? Y lo primero que siempre digo, bueno, veamos tus datos y veamos qué tienes, en términos de cuáles son las cosas que realmente quieres abordar. Entonces, ya sabes, sé que hablamos de decisiones basadas en datos, etc. Pero, ¿qué sabes? ¿Qué tipo de imagen podemos ver en términos de lo que está pasando? Porque puedes elegir, por eso siempre digo, yo, como la gente habla de intervenciones, y demás, lo sé, lo sabes. , hay muchas intervenciones geniales por ahí. Y puedes tener la mejor intervención desde el pan de molde, o ya sabes, desde el bolsillo seguro, lo que quieras decir. Pero la realidad es que solo el trabajo realmente aborda las cosas que usted quiere que abordemos. Entonces, si funciona para su comunidad, por así decirlo. Así que realmente creo que está comenzando en un lugar donde realmente puedes descubrir qué es eso. Y creo que tener comunicación con los miembros de la comunidad con los jóvenes, ya sabes, te ayudará a entender mejor cómo se ve eso.

 

María Christa Smith
Bueno, curiosamente, para nosotros, uno de nuestros factores de riesgo prioritarios son las actitudes de los padres que son importantes, cuando miramos el condado de Summit, en general, y Park City, en particular, tendemos a tener tasas de uso más altas que el promedio estatal. Y uno de los que saben, algunos de los datos que miramos, indican que debido a nuestras normas sociales y nuestra cultura de fiesta, y la gente viene aquí de vacaciones, eso juega un papel. Y que también sabemos que el lugar número uno en el que los niños consumen alcohol y marihuana es en casa con el permiso de sus padres. Entonces, lo que me fascina es, por un lado, creo que los padres están haciendo reducción de daños. Dicen que es más seguro si lo usa en casa conmigo, porque entonces no está conduciendo en su automóvil. Y, ya sabes, sabes lo que sucede con los jóvenes cuando no están supervisados, ya sea por asalto o lo que sea, eso puede suceder. Pero, por otro lado, sabemos que las actitudes favorables de los padres en realidad aumentan el riesgo.



Dr. Jason Burrow Sánchez
Si,

 

María Christa Smith
Espero que nuestra comunidad aquí, con actitudes un tanto liberales sobre el consumo de sustancias por parte de los jóvenes y, ya sabes, un patrón en nuestra comunidad de organizar fiestas para niños o permitirles usar en casa por un sentido que algunas personas tienen, es mejor en casa bajo mi ojo vigilante que no, ¿cómo, cómo hablamos con los padres sobre eso? ¿Que Consejo?

 

Dr. Jason Burrow Sánchez
No, creo que es una gran pregunta. Entonces, los tres agentes socializados, ya sabes, que realmente veo en, ya sabes, mi trabajo con nosotros, nuestros compañeros, la familia, en la escuela, ¿verdad? Entonces, ya sabes, porque pasan la mayor parte de su tiempo en uno de esos, y luego todos esos, por supuesto, están rodeados de comunidad. Pero ya sabes, lo que he hecho mucho he hecho noches de padres para las escuelas, y recibo preguntas como esta de los padres, y así sucesivamente. Y yo digo, bueno, una de las cosas que diría como padre, es que tengan muy claro cuáles son sus normas, ¿verdad? Porque si no tienes claro cuáles son tus normas, si lo dejas ambiguo, existe una alta probabilidad de que estés consumiendo estas sustancias, como el peso o hacer o hacer algunas otras cosas. No es, ya sabes, el nicad es un uso de sustancias de ese tipo. Una de las cosas, también notamos que acabamos de hacer un artículo sobre los cigarrillos electrónicos con los datos nítidos utilizando los datos de 2009 2017 que acabo de presentar sobre esto. Y en realidad lo que hicimos fue tomar todos los factores de riesgo y protección. Y miramos ¿cuáles son los que más predicen? ¿Y cuáles son los de factores de riesgo? ¿Cuáles son los que predicen mejor en términos de factores de protección y lo que encontramos para los factores de riesgo, que el que predice más alto para los niños que realmente van a usar cigarrillos electrónicos es haber estado con compañeros que también usan cigarrillos? ¿derecho? Así que no es sorprendente. Pero uno de los que realmente predijo lo mejor en términos de factor protector productivo es considerar que el cigarrillo electrónico es dañino. Entonces, se remonta a la idea de que si ha usado algo como dañino, en realidad es menos probable que lo haga. Y luego, los datos realmente correlacionan esto al observar el estado del estado también. Entonces, lo que yo diría es que los padres tengan una conversación honesta que ahora es una conversación, al menos, sobre qué son las sustancias. Y debido a que una de las cosas que queremos que hagan los adolescentes es comenzar a tomar sus propias decisiones utilizando información precisa, pensamos en el desarrollo del cerebro de los adolescentes, etc. Y sabemos que los adolescentes tienden a tomar mejores decisiones cuando tienen mejor información que también proviene del tipo de literatura sobre toma de decisiones de adolescentes, etc. Y también enséñeles sobre algunas de las cosas que sabemos y no sabemos sobre lo que las sustancias le hacen al cerebro y al cuerpo. Los cigarrillos electrónicos son geniales con eso, no sabemos mucho acerca de ser bastante honestos, tengo una presentación completamente diferente, hago un cigarrillo electrónico, es una sustancia bastante nueva que no ha existido por tanto tiempo y tenemos menos datos sobre los cigarrillos combustibles regulares, tenemos los datos de una década a la derecha. Desafortunadamente, esa es una de las sustancias que los jóvenes adquieren al principio de sus cigarrillos combustibles habituales. Como algunas de las cosas de las que también sabemos, cuando miramos los medios de comunicación populares, escuchamos mucho sobre los opiáceos. Y, por supuesto, eso es realmente horrible. Y, y una de las razones estamos seguros de que ese es el número de muertes, porque creo que este año vamos a hablar probablemente de 90.000 muertes en los Estados Unidos por sobredosis, lo cual es horrible. Pero creo que la otra cosa que la gente no siempre entiende es ese número cuando lo comparas con otras sustancias, así que si multiplicamos ese número por cinco y luego sumamos algo, entonces nos acercamos a cuántas personas mueren cada año por fumar. cigarrillos combustibles. De acuerdo, eso es alrededor de medio millón, lo que la gente no siempre tiene en cuenta. Y esa es una de las primeras sustancias que empiezas a captar. Si nos deshacemos de fumar cigarrillos combustibles, nos deshacemos de aproximadamente un tercio de todos los cánceres, lo crea o no. Entonces, esas son algunas de las conversaciones que creo que los padres deberían tener, ya sabes, con los jóvenes sobre qué son las sustancias, cuáles son algunas de las cosas que sabemos al respecto. ¿Cuáles son algunas de las cosas a las que vamos? He trabajado lo suficiente en prevención, he realizado estudios de tratamiento en los que tengo muchos jóvenes en estudios de tratamiento que vienen y me cuentan todos los beneficios del cannabis, etc. Y mi trabajo no es estar a favor o en contra de una cosa u otra. Y especialmente a medida que cambia la legalización del cannabis, cada votante, cada ciclo de votantes, ¿verdad? Cada ciclo de votación en términos de cómo se ve. Y ahora, si no lo ha mirado recientemente, Utah rodeado de estados, por favor, tres estados que tienen uso medicinal y recreativo del cannabis. ¿Derecha? Entonces sabemos que eso va a cambiar pronto, probablemente. Ya tenemos cannabis de uso medicinal que podemos usar todos. Pero luego hablé sobre algunos de los hechos que ¿qué es lo que realmente sabemos? ¿Qué sabe realmente la ciencia sobre el uso medicinal del cannabis y otras cosas? Derecha. Entonces, realmente puede tener algunas razones, una discusión sobre lo que sabemos y lo que no sabemos sobre algunas de estas cosas. Así que realmente pienso en tu cuestionario. Esa es una respuesta bastante larga. Pero vuelve a tu pregunta. Realmente creo que se trata de tener conversaciones, estas cosas son temas de conversación sobre de qué se trata la información. Y si no lo sabe, como padre, no siempre sé cuántas veces comienzo estas charlas diciendo que no hay una sola persona que sepa todo lo que hay que saber sobre las sustancias. Así que voy a buscarlo, ¿verdad? ¿Por qué no querría un modelo? ¿Cómo investigo cosas? ¿Y cómo encuentro información? ¿Y cómo puedo saber cuál es la información más precisa o no? Y algunas de las intervenciones con las que nos ocupamos es en realidad uno de los módulos. Hacemos una intervención basada en la investigación, porque se les enseña cómo hacer trabajos de investigación y cómo investigar información, ¿por qué no por qué no les enseñaríamos a investigar cosas que pueden introducir en el cuerpo, etc.? De todos modos, esa es una respuesta larga a tu pregunta, pero no.


María Christa Smith
Gracias. Eso es muy útil. Creo que Heather tiene una pregunta, Heather, ¿estás ahí?

 

Heather
Si. Hola, tengo una pregunta para ti. En primer lugar, gracias por esta descripción general basada en evidencia científica de alto nivel sobre el impacto del uso de sustancias en los cerebros en desarrollo. Y mi pregunta es para un adolescente que puede desafiar esta información o para un padre que quiere pedirle a su joven que escriba un, ya sabes, un documento sobre el impacto de esto en su cerebro. ¿A qué recursos les recomienda que recurran para profundizar más?


Dr. Jason Burrow Sánchez
Entonces, una de las cosas que dije, la década de 1940 es un gran recurso. Pero una de las cosas que hacemos en nuestro trabajo con equipos es que, de hecho, publicamos algunas de esas preguntas. Y los tenemos, incluso lo llamamos, no lo llamamos tarea. Las llamamos hojas de práctica o, ya sabes, oportunidades de práctica. Y la idea es que nosotros, los conseguimos, les preguntamos, ¿Cuáles son las tres cosas? ¿Qué es lo que desea saber sobre las sustancias? ¿Cuáles son las preguntas candentes que tienes? Porque lo que no nos motiva puede que no sea eso lo que motiva al equipo. Así que realmente queremos encontrar algo que motive al equipo. ¿Derecha? Entonces, ¿qué preguntas quieres saber? ¿Tienes una pregunta candente sobre el cannabis? ¿O cigarrillos electrónicos o lo que sea? ¿Quizás y encontrar eso? Y luego decimos, ¿cuál es el siguiente paso? ¿En términos de dónde iría a buscar información? Así que una de mis bromas es que si van a High Times tranquilos, entonces siempre digo en la audiencia, si no saben lo que es, vayan a buscarlo. Pero si ese es su recurso principal, o su fuente principal, probablemente sea muy diferente a la noche, ¿verdad? ¿Ese es tu abuso de drogas? Pero la cuestión es que creo que lo que estamos tratando de enseñar es ¿cómo se investiga la información? ¿Y luego cómo se verifica que los recursos de recursos sean fuentes primarias? ¿En términos de cómo se ven? ¿Derecha? ¿Cuál es la información que está recopilando? ¿De dónde vienen? Etcétera. Así que ese es un aspecto. El otro aspecto que mencionaste, Heather, es la pieza desafiante. Y yo en mi objetivo es que creo que estaba respondiendo todas las preguntas, porque no soy un tipo a favor o en contra, ¿verdad? No te voy a decir que hagas esto, no estás en esto. Entonces, cuando enseño esto, doy un curso de consejería sobre abuso de sustancias en mi programa de posgrado aquí, y obtengo graduados todo el tiempo, ellos no discutirán conmigo sobre si la marihuana debería legalizarse. Y voy, eso no es lo mío. Sabes, eso se lo dejo a los votantes. Eso se lo dejo a los políticos, porque de todos modos no voy a influir en eso. Sin embargo, lo que estoy aquí para decirles es ¿qué ciencia qué ciencia? ¿Sabemos, este campus realmente ayuda con la depresión? ¿ansiedad? No he visto esas cosas. No sé que ese sea el caso desde una perspectiva basada en la ciencia. Pero, ¿qué hacemos, qué sabemos? O lo que no sabemos. Y seamos honestos al respecto. Entonces, cuando he tenido jóvenes que vienen, que han estado en mis estudios de tratamiento y me han dicho: “Puede traer algo de lo que estás hablando”, diga: Bueno, ya sabes, el cannabis es bueno para ti. Es natural, es nervio, es de la tierra, todas esas cosas. Y dije, ya sabes, no me voy a transferir. Pero voy a decir, dame algo de información que me ayude a entender y que me ayude a entender tu perspectiva. Entonces, lo que realmente creo que es más importante es poder conectarme con el adolescente y comprender su perspectiva. Y puedo pensar, al mismo tiempo, conectar para que puedan entender su perspectiva en términos de lo que ambos están tratando de hablar. Pero realmente creo que llegar a un terreno común, y lo que es, ya sabes, información basada en la evidencia basada en la ciencia que parece razonable, porque a veces algunos de los argumentos, he trabajado lo suficiente con la adolescencia, para saber que algunos de sus argumentos tipo de desmoronarse, cuando los sacan dentro de su cabeza. Y comienzan a saber, a explicarlos en la lanza del éter allí y solo intentaron hablar sobre ellos, no siempre tienen tanto sentido como eso. Y es realmente difícil, ya sabes, cuando empezamos a avanzar en algunos de estos conceptos es realmente negar o no tener en cuenta todo lo que sabemos sobre la ciencia del cerebro y cómo funciona el cerebro, y así sucesivamente. . Así que creo que, más que nada, quiero empoderarlos con información, buena información y cómo pueden acceder a eso porque creo que eso es mucho más importante. Y si tengo que generalizar algunos de ellos, ¿Cómo encuentro las siguientes mejores habilidades de iPhone, habilidades de investigación? Entonces lo haré. Derecha. Le preguntaré, como, ¿cómo encontraste tu próxima compra de iPhone? Porque sabes, la investigación ahora? Y luego diré, ¿cómo se lo generaliza a otra persona? Ahora, ¿cuándo quieres saberlo? Así que siempre lo convierto en un desafío. Y cuando hemos hecho sesiones con adolescentes, en torno a una de las sesiones que hacemos es por qué pensamos que la gente usa sustancias, incluso los adolescentes más duros con los que he trabajado, cuando yo cuando planteé la idea, ¿por qué tú Creo que la gente consume sustancias. Todavía no he conocido ninguna, no tengo ninguna razón por la que piensan que eso ocurre, ya sea, ya sabes, algo correcto o incorrecto, o lo que sea. Pero la idea es simplemente participar en el proceso.


María Christa Smith
Gracias. Esa fue una gran pregunta, Heather, y agradezco tu atenta respuesta, Jason. ¿Hay alguien más además de Heather Knight, a quien le gustaría hacer una pregunta en nuestros últimos minutos? Esta es su, esta es su oportunidad, esta es su oportunidad. Entonces, si lo desea, puede levantar la mano en la parte inferior de la pantalla y darle uno o dos minutos para decidir. Y si no es así, entonces sepa que este seminario web se publicará en nuestro sitio web, generalmente dentro de una semana, y lo compartiremos con todos ustedes. Y publicaremos algunos enlaces junto con eso en nuestro blog. Para que pueda compartir esto con otras personas que estarán interesadas en escuchar esta información que hemos escuchado aquí esta noche. Así que no veo otras manos. Jason, solo quiero agradecerle mucho por compartir su experiencia. Este es uno de ustedes, cuando hablamos de, ya sabes, cuáles son los factores de riesgo en tu comunidad, hemos identificado el riesgo percibido de consumo de sustancias, los niños no lo ven como un riesgo, actitudes de los padres favorables a las sustancias. abuso, así como depresión y ansiedad. Y si

 

Dr. Jason Burrow Sánchez
He visto tus cosas. Creo que, en realidad, tienes razón. Entonces hacemos estudios empíricos en el backend probándolos. Y creo que tienes razón, honestamente. Entonces, con las cosas que está viendo, para ser honesto, le enviaré un artículo que acabamos de hacer sobre los cigarrillos electrónicos que analiza todos los factores de riesgo y protección en la aguda para eso. Pero sí, creo que estás, estás en las cosas correctas.

 

María Christa Smith
Bueno, es un gran problema que abordar. Y estoy muy contento de que nuestra comunidad ahora tenga este recurso, porque estoy de acuerdo con usted en que cuanto más comprendan los padres el impacto en el cerebro adolescente y más jóvenes comprendan que el impacto los empodera para tomar mejores decisiones informadas y, con suerte, más saludables. para ellos mismos. Así que este seminario web de esta noche sin duda nos ha proporcionado un recurso para que nuestra comunidad tenga esa información. Así que estoy realmente agradecido por venir y compartir con nuestra comunidad hoy.

 

Dr. Jason Burrow Sánchez
Gracias por eso estaba feliz de hacerlo. Espero que sea información práctica que la gente pueda usar. Ese es mi gran objetivo.

 

María Christa Smith
Absolutamente lo es. Así que gracias. Dr. Jason Burrows Sánchez, gracias a todos por asistir. Podrá encontrar todo esto en nuestro sitio web en CTC summit county.org. Que tengas una noche maravillosa.

 

Dr. Jason Burrow Sánchez
Gracias.

 

María Christa Smith
Adiós

Upcoming Events