Mental Health Mondays with Mary Christa Smith; Executive Director of CTC Summit County

Jul 15, 2021 | Mental Health Mondays

Mary Christa Smith is the director for CTC Summit County – our community’s youth prevention coalition.  She shares the mission and the work of the organization and how you can get involved with supporting youth and families.
Jessica Crate
Awesome, Happy Monday. Welcome to our mental health Mondays, a Communities That Care video podcast discussing mental health. At CTC Summit County, our vision is truly a world of connection, vitality and well being where kids and families thrive. And our mission is truly to collaboratively improve the lives of youth and families by fostering a culture of health through prevention. And connection is prevention. And and an essence of that we have one of my favorite people, our executive director of Communities That Care here in Summit County, Mrs. Mary, Christa Smith. So Mary, Krista, thank you so much for joining us today. And for all the work that you do with CTC and beyond in our community. So I’m excited to interview you today. So tell us a little bit more about yourself, you know, the organization really why you’re excited to not only partner with the chamber, but some things that you have going on. 

 

Mary Christa Smith
Thanks so much, Jess, this is fun. I’m glad that we get to do this together. I’m Mary Christa Smith, and I’m the executive director for Communities That Care. I’m a lifelong yutan. I grew up in Salt Lake City and moved to New York City in 1991. And I’ve been here ever since. And have a deep love and care for our community and feel really honored to be able to work in this capacity for a cause that I care so deeply about fostering a culture of health and preventing youth substance use and suicide. It’s such important work. And so this, you know, this work with CTC began in 2017. And we just continue to grow and expand and bring in more and more partners and collaborators like the Chamber of Commerce, we’re so delighted to have their support of this podcast, so that we can meet more folks connect our community to greater resources, and really help people empower their kids to make healthy choices. And you know, it is true that connection is prevention. And so we we like to connect people with resources with each other. And this podcast is a wonderful way to do that. 

 

Jessica Crate 
Awesome. Well, we appreciate you. And it’s been really fun kicking this off and launching this together. Let’s talk a little bit more about the organization Communities That Care. Really, this is such an amazing focal point in our community here in Summit County. So let’s talk about how CTC fosters mental health and wholeness in throughout the community.

 

Mary Christa Smith 
Well, I think our model is somewhat unique in our community, but it’s used all across the country and all across the world. We are a coalition model. So we really focus on process rather than programs. And our process is to gather our stakeholders, all those us serving organizations in our community together. So if you were to come to one of our meetings and look around the room, you would see folks from the hospital and local nonprofits and our business community as well as local government and just concerned parents, physicians, all kinds of people who care about youth health and well being. And we gather our coalition together, we look at data together, we look at needs, and gaps in our community. We also identify our strengths, where were we strong? Where are we resilient. And then we work together to create a community strategic plan to promote resilience to to strengthen those protective factors like community connection, positive relationships with parents, and we look to reduce risk factors such as perceived risk of substance use anxiety and depression. And so the model is really to gather the community together and say, who’s best position to do this important work and how can we support one another in this important work? And there are incredible programs for any parent who is listening today. If you were to go to our website, CTC Summit county.org, and click on our calendar of events, you would see community programs and events all across Summit County that are here to help you to provide spaces for your kids to do awesome things for you to connect with other parents and especially for our middle school parents and high school parents. thoughtful and empowering resources about boundaries and staying connected even when our kids are pulling away and forging their own path, there are things that we can absolutely do as parents to keep them healthy and safe. And so that’s really the model for Communities That Care to drive that community wide impact. And it’s, it’s a long term game, you know, this is not something that happens just in one year or two years. We look at prevention outcomes that happen over decades, and having been in the community for four and a half years, we are, we have traction, we have momentum, we have great engagement. And I feel like we’re really living into the potential of our organization at this point in time, 

 

Jessica Crate 
100%. And you have done such a phenomenal job really integrating and, you know, we always talk about it takes a village, and we have such an amazing community of individuals organizations. So let’s talk about you know, from your perspective, as well as CTCs how you think community connectedness not only plays in our mental health, but how has DTC? Really, I mean, you highlighted several key factors that how is it contributed to the mental health and wholeness within our community? 

 

Mary Christa Smith
Thanks. That’s such a great question Jess you know, when we look at risk factors and protective factors, one of the key protective factors is community connectedness. And we look at connectedness in different domains within youth in their peers, within their families, but also more broadly in our community. And the survey data that we gather, ask questions such as do your neighbors know who they are, who you are, with, they recognize that you’ve done a good job. And it’s so essential for young people not just to have close relationships with their parents, but close relationships with church leaders and teachers and the neighbor down the street, and that they know that their community cares about them. And the way that they know that is that there is an actual personal connection. We know that this is at the heart of what makes a resilient community and I think about COVID-19 and what we’ve all gone through together as a glow. And here in Park City in Summit County, I could really see those threads of connections strengthen the way in which people reached out to one another, checked in on one another so generously donated their time and their and their funds, the Park City Community Foundation raised $3.4 million community response fund to help people with rent and utilities and that outpouring of care is so essential. And so I really believe that’s at the heart of who we are as a community and Park City. And you know, it’s at risk of fraying. And one of the ways that’s at risk is that 80% of our homes in Summit County are second homes, that it’s hard to have neighborhoods, when you don’t have neighbors. We have a lot of our homes that are used as Airbnb and vacation rentals. And it’s, it’s really different when you have people coming in and out of your neighborhood on a daily or weekly basis rather than the neighbor next door who you can rely upon and get to know on a personal level. So it’s, it’s essential for our well being and it’s essential for our kids to know that they’re held within a community and beyond just their family systems. So we, you know, one of the ways that we worked over COVID was to really show our educators and our first responders that we care about them. We believe that caring is a it’s a verb. It’s something that you do, it’s an action that you take, it’s not just a feeling. And so for everyone out there who’s thinking about, you know, what role do I play in prevention? What role do I play in fostering well being? Please find ways to support the youth that are in your neighborhood and in your community, get to know them? Volunteer in organizations that work for them, say hello, how are you doing, find out what they’re up to and build and foster those relationships because they are protective factors. They are the love bubble that keep our kids safe and healthy and thriving. 

 

Jessica Crate
I love that you brought up the love bubble. And, you know, we talk a lot about living in a resort town and the different factors that go into, you know, mental health and how it correlates with living in a resort town. And, and it is, you know, the influx in and out of having people that may not be permanent or consistent neighbors and trying to develop community. So let’s dive into that a little bit more, let’s talk about some of the specific mental health issues that are related to living in a resort town that not only you see in your work, but some tips that you might recommend to our viewers some action items that people can say, oh, wow, okay, I haven’t thought about that, or this is something I need to be aware of. And here’s what I can do moving forward.

 

Mary Christa Smith
It’s interesting that you asked that question, just cat the cats hamsterdam Foundation is a family foundation and they focus on mental health across the Vail resort communities, and they have a real passion project for mental health as anyone who’s worked with Vail knows. And they have commissioned a rather in depth study from all their resort towns and looked at common risk factors for mental health, specifically in resort towns. And this has been very instructive for Communities That Care because we are different than Salt Lake City, or Murray, or Pleasant Grove, or what have you. We have a different kind of economy here in Park City, and Summit County. And what the studies and findings have found is the number one mental health risk factor in resort communities is lack of affordable housing. And that the second is party culture. And people come here on vacation, they come here to have a good time, they come here to celebrate. And oftentimes that involves substance use, specifically alcohol. And so we have a tagline in our recent public service campaign. And it goes something along the lines of growing up in a resort town makes an impression on our youth, but not every day is our prey, especially for our kids. So what happens when kids see that the way in which we celebrate the way in which we connect the way in which we wind down involves drinking it, it, it makes an impact in how they perceive the risks involved in that. And I would say to any parent who’s listening, we know so much more about brain science today than we did when I was growing up. And what we know is that the brains of our adolescence are highly plastic, they are growing new synapses and making new connections and the prefrontal cortex is coming online. And this is where all that higher order thinking takes place. But it’s not there yet. And if we introduce substances, while kids are teenagers, it hardwires the brain for addiction, those synapses get wired in concert with substance use. And the data bears this out. So for a teen who’s Sue starts drinking before the age of 15, or at the age of 15, their chance of being alcohol dependent is 43%. If they wait until they are 21, it’s 7%. So it really, really matters. And we have a culture of drinking in our town, there’s a saying that we live in a drinking town with a ski problem. And, you know, it is infused not only here, but across ski resort communities all over our, our country. And so we have a lot of work to do when it comes to culture and norms and what what we think it means to celebrate and those kinds of boundaries that we set with our kids around clear communication. So I I encourage folks to model other ways to connect and relax and celebrate and show your kids and show the teams around you that isn’t the only way necessarily the healthiest way and it’s certainly not an appropriate way for kids whose brains are still developing to be doing that.

 

Jessica Crate
100% and that’s a it’s a huge point to bring up too as we’re working with youth and families and how the to interconnect and how synergistic. Both of those relationships are. And that brings me to our next question, which is, you know, really, when we get down to it, what is one action item someone can do right now? Today to foster their well being during this time for for not only ourselves, but for our children for each other, to stay connected in our community, 

 

Mary Christa Smith
There’s one thing that I could share with families that I think is kind of the secret sauce is to set aside time every week, with your kids phones off computers off in a way that allows you to have a space in which conversations can take place. So, you know, some people call these family meetings, I call it pancakes on Sunday, whatever it is, but what that does is it creates the space where when your kids have things that are going to arise for them, they know and there’s this opportunity to talk through with you what’s going on. So I would say being very intentional about creating that space and time and taking it as an opportunity to talk about what are your values as a family? And what are your family rules around substance use? And what are the consequences for the kids if they use and to be super explicit about that. There’s another saying in our campaign, which is, our kids can’t keep a boundary we don’t set for sure. So have those family meetings, those Sunday pancakes, make intentional time to be together as a family, and utilize that time to talk about your values and your boundaries around substance use within your family. And it is the greatest protective practice that you can give to your kids.

 

Jessica Crate  

I love that we call it you know, disconnect to reconnect and we’re going to shut off the phones and we’re going to reconnect and I love that you you know really set that set in stone and be intentional to you know, with your family, with your kids, but with yourselves and understand what that looks like for your household. So that that’s the ripple effect. And you know, when you can positively affect change in your own lives. And it stems from the leadership in the household. It’s it can cascade over, not only your kids, but their friends and the families. So, such great advice. Love it. And now you know what one of my favorite questions is, if you can wave your magic wand, what would you like to see or create an envision in our community moving forward. 

 

Mary Christa Smith
If I could wave my magic wand today, it would be this practice this very practical practice that we all treat each other with kindness and respect. There’s such a there’s such a lack of that in our public discourse these days, and what I yearn for and wish for and if I could wave my magic wand would bea return toward a return towards kindness and listening and respectful conversation because our kids are watching, they are modeling our behavior. And we have an obligation to them to set a hopeful tone, a kind tone, a respectful tone, to treat each other with consideration and grace. And so that would be my magic wand.

 

Jessica Crate
I love it. So powerful and just you know having that that love that. People know that they come to Park City and they’re going to experience what I love to call a hallmark town right and, and just meeting amazing individuals like yourself. Now we are we do have the Chamber of Commerce as our title sponsor, which we are so excited to be partnering with them moving forward with not only our video podcast, but with Communities That Care. Let’s talk a little bit more about that partnership and how the chamber has helped you with your work. And what that looks like moving forward. 

 

Mary Christa Smith
Thanks Jess the chamber is such an important partner. Our business community is at the heart of our community. It’s not separate from our community. It is integrated within it, whether its owners or employees or you know, the brick and mortar buildings that you and I go to every day. Our business community is integral to our sense of community and who we are and how we thrive. And I think businesses have a unique opportunity and role to play in fostering Youth Connection and well being and doing prevention work, whether it’s being mindful that the products that they’re offering providing opportunities for young people to learn skills and, and grow in their entrepreneurial and professional lives. There’s an incredible opportunity for mentorship. And I’m really delighted that Jennifer Wessel Hoff is the new CEO and president of the Chamber of Commerce, because she brings with her a wealth of experience from Tucson. No, excuse me from Sedona, Arizona, as their former president of their chamber around sustainable tourism. And at its heart sustainable tourism asks, those who come here to care for the place that they’re visiting, as deeply as we all care for it, that were those of us who are here. And so there’s a understanding at the heart of sustainable tourism, about the importance of the community that lives here and the natural environment that is here, and the children that are here in the community. And I really love that we have a president who can weave these things together instead of, you know, what I have seen in the past, which has been businesses over here and community is over here, right. And they have separate interests. Now we have shared interests. And so I think that the Chamber’s generous sponsorship of this podcast is evidence of their commitment and care for our community and a desire to foster this, this wellbeing across our community. And so I’m really excited with this first step with them and to see where we can take it together. This is just the beginning of good things. 

 

Jessica Crate 
So it is it’s so exciting. And it’s so awesome to have such an amazing integral community to be able to reach out Connect, you know, uplift, inspire and help others continue to succeed and thrive. So last but not least, Mary Christa, what is your legacy, a quote, a mantra, something that you’d like to leave with our guests and viewers today?

 

Mary Christa Smith
Well, a legacy you know, I there’s a saying that we plant trees who shaped we will never see. And I it’s my legacy. As you know, I do this not for myself, I do this not even for my own kids. But I do it for the generations that are to come. And for the foundation that we’re laying for their health and well being and that when they’re born 100 years from now, 1000 years from now, they’ll look back and say, you know, this community thought about us and cared about us and created this world that we’re being born into with thought and love and courage. And so  I hope to be a small part of creating that legacy. 

 

Jessica Crate
Just think about that those of you tuning in, you know that the seeds you’re planting now may provide shade for generations to come gives me chills, so powerful and such an amazing ripple effect and, you know, legacy and life that you’re leading and leaving. So thank you so much, Mary Krista and those of you tuning in. Thank you so much for joining us on our mental health Mondays. A video podcast is CTC Summit County, and on behalf of our executive director, Mary Christa, Mike and myself, as well as the Chamber of Commerce. We’d like to thank you for tuning in and sharing this and plugging in. You can find a link to all of our podcasts at CTC summit county.org as well as our Facebook page. So please continue to tune in and share this as we continue to provide and support with resources. So thanks again. And you have a wonderful day. Bye for now

Jessica Crate
Impresionante, feliz lunes. Bienvenido a nuestros lunes de salud mental, un video podcast de Communities That Care que trata sobre la salud mental. En CTC Summit County, nuestra visión es verdaderamente un mundo de conexión, vitalidad y bienestar donde los niños y las familias prosperen. Y nuestra misión es verdaderamente mejorar de manera colaborativa las vidas de los jóvenes y las familias fomentando una cultura de salud a través de la prevención. Y la conexión es prevención. Y como esencia de eso, tenemos a una de mis personas favoritas, nuestra directora ejecutiva de Communities That Care aquí en el condado de Summit, la Sra. Mary, Christa Smith. Mary, Krista, muchas gracias por acompañarnos hoy. Y por todo el trabajo que hacen con CTC y más allá en nuestra comunidad. Así que estoy emocionado de entrevistarte hoy. Así que cuéntenos un poco más sobre usted, ya sabe, la organización, realmente, por qué está emocionado no solo de asociarse con la cámara, sino también de algunas cosas que está sucediendo.

 

María Christa Smith
Muchas gracias, Jess, esto es divertido. Me alegro de que podamos hacer esto juntos. Soy Mary Christa Smith y soy la directora ejecutiva de Communities That Care. Soy un yután de toda la vida. Crecí en Salt Lake City y me mudé a la ciudad de Nueva York en 1991. Y he estado aquí desde entonces. Y tengo un profundo amor y cuidado por nuestra comunidad y me siento realmente honrado de poder trabajar en esta capacidad por una causa que me importa tanto fomentar una cultura de salud y prevenir el uso de sustancias y el suicidio entre los jóvenes. Es un trabajo tan importante. Y entonces, este trabajo con CTC comenzó en 2017. Y simplemente continuamos creciendo y expandiéndonos y atrayendo más y más socios y colaboradores como la Cámara de Comercio, estamos muy contentos de contar con su apoyo para este podcast. , para que podamos conocer a más personas, conectar nuestra comunidad con mayores recursos y realmente ayudar a las personas a capacitar a sus hijos para que tomen decisiones saludables. Y sabes, es cierto que la conexión es prevención. Por eso nos gusta conectar a las personas con los recursos entre sí. Y este podcast es una forma maravillosa de hacerlo.

 

Jessica Crate
Impresionante. Bueno, te agradecemos. Y ha sido muy divertido empezar y lanzar esto juntos. Hablemos un poco más sobre la organización Communities That Care. Realmente, este es un punto focal increíble en nuestra comunidad aquí en el condado de Summit. Así que hablemos de cómo CTC fomenta la salud mental y la integridad en toda la comunidad.



María Christa Smith
Bueno, creo que nuestro modelo es algo único en nuestra comunidad, pero se usa en todo el país y en todo el mundo. Somos un modelo de coalición. Así que realmente nos enfocamos en el proceso más que en los programas. Y nuestro proceso es reunir a nuestras partes interesadas, a todos aquellos que servimos a las organizaciones de nuestra comunidad. Entonces, si viniera a una de nuestras reuniones y mirara alrededor de la sala, vería personas del hospital y organizaciones sin fines de lucro locales y nuestra comunidad empresarial, así como del gobierno local y solo padres preocupados, médicos, todo tipo de personas que se preocupan por salud y bienestar de los jóvenes. Y reunimos a nuestra coalición, analizamos los datos juntos, analizamos las necesidades y las brechas en nuestra comunidad. También identificamos nuestras fortalezas, ¿dónde éramos fuertes? ¿Dónde somos resilientes? Y luego trabajamos juntos para crear un plan estratégico comunitario para promover la resiliencia para fortalecer esos factores protectores como la conexión con la comunidad, las relaciones positivas con los padres, y buscamos reducir los factores de riesgo como el riesgo percibido de ansiedad y depresión por el uso de sustancias. Entonces, el modelo es realmente reunir a la comunidad y decir, ¿quién está en la mejor posición para hacer este importante trabajo y cómo podemos apoyarnos unos a otros en este importante trabajo? Y hay programas increíbles para cualquier padre que esté escuchando hoy. Si fuera a nuestro sitio web, CTC Summit county.org, y haga clic en nuestro calendario de eventos, verá programas y eventos comunitarios en todo el condado de Summit que están aquí para ayudarlo a proporcionar espacios para que sus hijos hagan cosas increíbles. para que se conecte con otros padres y especialmente con nuestros padres de escuela intermedia y secundaria. Recursos reflexivos y empoderadores sobre los límites y mantenerse conectados incluso cuando nuestros hijos se están alejando y forjando su propio camino, hay cosas que podemos hacer absolutamente como padres para mantenerlos sanos y seguros. Y ese es realmente el modelo para que Communities That Care impulse ese impacto en toda la comunidad. Y es, es un juego a largo plazo, ya sabes, esto no es algo que suceda solo en uno o dos años. Observamos los resultados de la prevención que suceden durante décadas, y habiendo estado en la comunidad durante cuatro años y medio, estamos, tenemos tracción, tenemos impulso, tenemos un gran compromiso. Y siento que realmente estamos viviendo el potencial de nuestra organización en este momento,

 

Jessica Crate
100%. Y han hecho un trabajo fenomenal realmente integrando y, ya saben, siempre hablamos de que se necesita un pueblo, y tenemos una comunidad increíble de organizaciones individuales. Así que hablemos de lo que sabe, desde su perspectiva, así como de los CTC, cómo cree que la conexión comunitaria no solo influye en nuestra salud mental, sino que ¿cómo lo ha hecho el DTC? Realmente, quiero decir, destacó varios factores clave sobre cómo se contribuye a la salud mental y la integridad dentro de nuestra comunidad.



María Christa Smith
Gracias. Esa es una gran pregunta Jess, sabes, cuando miramos los factores de riesgo y los factores de protección, uno de los factores de protección clave es la conexión con la comunidad. Y miramos la conectividad en diferentes dominios dentro de los jóvenes en sus pares, dentro de sus familias, pero también más ampliamente en nuestra comunidad. Y los datos de la encuesta que recopilamos, hacen preguntas como si sus vecinos saben quiénes son, con quién es usted, reconocen que ha hecho un buen trabajo. Y es tan esencial que los jóvenes no solo tengan una relación cercana con sus padres, sino también una relación cercana con los líderes y maestros de la iglesia y el vecino de la calle, y que sepan que su comunidad se preocupa por ellos. Y la forma en que lo saben es que existe una conexión personal real. Sabemos que esto está en el corazón de lo que hace a una comunidad resiliente y pienso en COVID-19 y lo que todos hemos pasado juntos como un resplandor. Y aquí en Park City en el condado de Summit, realmente pude ver que esos hilos de conexiones fortalecen la forma en que las personas se comunican entre sí, se comunican entre sí de manera tan generosa y donan su tiempo y sus fondos, la Fundación Comunitaria de Park City. recaudó $ 3.4 millones de fondos de respuesta comunitaria para ayudar a las personas con el alquiler y los servicios públicos y que la atención es tan esencial. Y realmente creo que eso es la esencia de quiénes somos como comunidad y Park City. Y sabes, corre el riesgo de deshilacharse. Y una de las formas en que está en riesgo es que el 80% de nuestras casas en el condado de Summit son segundas residencias, que es difícil tener vecindarios cuando no hay vecinos. Tenemos muchas de nuestras casas que se utilizan como Airbnb y alquileres de vacaciones. Y es realmente diferente cuando tienes personas que entran y salen de tu vecindario diariamente o semanalmente en lugar del vecino de al lado en el que puedes confiar y conocer a nivel personal. Por lo tanto, es esencial para nuestro bienestar y es esencial que nuestros hijos sepan que están recluidos dentro de una comunidad y más allá de sus sistemas familiares. Así que, ya sabes, una de las formas en que trabajamos con COVID fue realmente mostrarles a nuestros educadores y a nuestros socorristas que nos preocupamos por ellos. Creemos que cuidar es un verbo. Es algo que haces, es una acción que realizas, no es solo un sentimiento. Entonces, para todos los que están pensando, ya sabes, ¿qué papel tengo yo en la prevención? ¿Qué papel desempeño en la promoción del bienestar? Por favor encuentre formas de apoyar a los jóvenes que están en su vecindario y en su comunidad, ¿conózcalos? Ofrézcase como voluntario en organizaciones que trabajan para ellos, diga hola, cómo está, averigüe qué están haciendo y construya y fomente esas relaciones porque son factores de protección. Son la burbuja de amor que mantiene a nuestros hijos seguros, sanos y prósperos.

 

Jessica Crate
Me encanta que hayas sacado a relucir la burbuja del amor. Y, ya sabes, hablamos mucho sobre vivir en una ciudad turística y los diferentes factores que intervienen, ya sabes, la salud mental y cómo se correlaciona con vivir en una ciudad turística. Y es, ya sabes, la afluencia de personas que pueden no ser vecinos permanentes o consistentes y que tratan de desarrollar una comunidad. Así que profundicemos en eso un poco más, hablemos sobre algunos de los problemas específicos de salud mental relacionados con vivir en una ciudad turística que no solo ves en tu trabajo, sino algunos consejos que podrías recomendar a nuestros espectadores. elementos que la gente puede decir, oh, guau, está bien, no he pensado en eso, o esto es algo de lo que debo estar consciente. Y esto es lo que puedo hacer para seguir adelante.

 


María Christa Smith
Es interesante que hicieras esa pregunta, simplemente la Fundación cat the cats hamsterdam es una fundación familiar y se enfoca en la salud mental en las comunidades turísticas de Vail, y tienen un proyecto de pasión real por la salud mental, como lo sabe cualquiera que haya trabajado con Vail. Y han encargado un estudio bastante profundo de todas sus ciudades turísticas y han analizado los factores de riesgo comunes para la salud mental, específicamente en las ciudades turísticas. Y esto ha sido muy instructivo para Communities That Care porque somos diferentes a Salt Lake City, Murray, Pleasant Grove o lo que sea. Tenemos un tipo de economía diferente aquí en Park City y en el condado de Summit. Y lo que los estudios y hallazgos han encontrado es que el factor de riesgo de salud mental número uno en las comunidades turísticas es la falta de viviendas asequibles. Y que el segundo es la cultura de fiesta. Y la gente viene aquí de vacaciones, viene aquí para pasar un buen rato, viene aquí para celebrar. Y muchas veces eso involucra el uso de sustancias, específicamente alcohol. Y entonces tenemos un lema en nuestra reciente campaña de servicio público. Y va algo así como crecer en una ciudad turística que impresiona a nuestra juventud, pero no todos los días es nuestra presa, especialmente para nuestros hijos. Entonces, ¿qué sucede cuando los niños ven que la forma en que celebramos la forma en que conectamos la forma en que nos relajamos implica beberlo? Tiene un impacto en la forma en que perciben los riesgos involucrados en eso. Y le diría a cualquier padre que esté escuchando, sabemos mucho más sobre la ciencia del cerebro hoy que cuando era niño. Y lo que sabemos es que los cerebros de nuestra adolescencia son muy plásticos, están desarrollando nuevas sinapsis y haciendo nuevas conexiones y la corteza prefrontal se está conectando. Y aquí es donde tiene lugar todo ese pensamiento de orden superior. Pero aún no está ahí. Y si introducimos sustancias, mientras que los niños son adolescentes, conecta el cerebro para la adicción, esas sinapsis se conectan en concierto con el consumo de sustancias. Y los datos lo confirman. Entonces, para un adolescente que Sue comienza a beber antes de los 15 años, o a los 15 años, su probabilidad de ser dependiente del alcohol es del 43%. Si esperan hasta los 21, es un 7%. Así que realmente importa. Y tenemos una cultura de beber en nuestra ciudad, hay un dicho que dice que vivimos en una ciudad con problemas de esquí. Y, ya sabes, se infunde no solo aquí, sino en las comunidades de estaciones de esquí de todo nuestro, nuestro país. Así que tenemos mucho trabajo por hacer en lo que respecta a la cultura y las normas y lo que creemos que significa celebrar y ese tipo de límites que establecemos con nuestros hijos en torno a una comunicación clara. Así que animo a la gente a modelar otras formas de conectarse, relajarse, celebrar, mostrarles a sus hijos y mostrarles a los equipos que lo rodean que no es la única forma necesariamente la más saludable y ciertamente no es una forma adecuada para los niños cuyos cerebros aún se están desarrollando. estar haciendo eso.

 

Jessica Crate
100% y eso es un gran punto para mencionar también, ya que estamos trabajando con jóvenes y familias y cómo interconectarnos y qué sinergias. Ambas relaciones lo son. Y eso me lleva a nuestra siguiente pregunta, que es, ya sabes, realmente, cuando llegamos a eso, ¿cuál es un elemento de acción que alguien puede hacer en este momento? Hoy para fomentar su bienestar durante este tiempo no solo para nosotros, sino para nuestros hijos entre nosotros, para estar conectados en nuestra comunidad,

 

María Christa Smith
Hay una cosa que podría compartir con las familias que creo que es una especie de salsa secreta: reservar tiempo cada semana, con los teléfonos de sus hijos apagados en las computadoras de una manera que les permita tener un espacio en el que puedan tener lugar las conversaciones. Entonces, ya sabes, algunas personas llaman a estas reuniones familiares, yo lo llamo panqueques los domingos, lo que sea, pero lo que hace es crear el espacio donde cuando sus hijos tienen cosas que van a surgir para ellos, saben y hay esta oportunidad de hablar con usted sobre lo que está pasando. Entonces, diría que es muy intencional en la creación de ese espacio y tiempo y lo toma como una oportunidad para hablar sobre cuáles son sus valores como familia. ¿Y cuáles son las reglas de su familia sobre el uso de sustancias? Y cuáles son las consecuencias para los niños si lo usan y son súper explícitos al respecto. Hay otro dicho en nuestra campaña, que es, nuestros hijos no pueden mantener un límite que no establecemos con seguridad. Así que esas reuniones familiares, esos panqueques dominicales, hagan un tiempo intencional para estar juntos como familia y utilicen ese tiempo para hablar sobre sus valores y sus límites en torno al consumo de sustancias dentro de su familia. Y es la mejor práctica de protección que puede darles a sus hijos.



Jessica Crate
Me encanta que lo llamemos, ya sabes, desconectamos para reconectarnos y vamos a apagar los teléfonos y nos vamos a reconectar y me encanta que sepas que realmente estableces ese grabado en piedra y que seas intencional con lo que sabes, con su familia, con sus hijos, pero con ustedes mismos y entiendan cómo se ve eso para su hogar. De modo que ese es el efecto dominó. Y sabes, cuando puedes afectar positivamente el cambio en tus propias vidas. Y proviene del liderazgo en el hogar. Puede caer en cascada, no solo sobre sus hijos, sino también sobre sus amigos y familias. Entonces, qué gran consejo. Me encanta. Y ahora sabes cuál es una de mis preguntas favoritas, si puedes agitar tu varita mágica, qué te gustaría ver o crear una visión en nuestra comunidad para seguir adelante.

 

María Christa Smith
Si pudiera agitar mi varita mágica hoy, sería esta práctica, esta práctica tan práctica que todos nos tratamos con amabilidad y respeto. Hay tal falta de eso en nuestro discurso público en estos días, y lo que anhelo y deseo, y si pudiera agitar mi varita mágica, sería regresar hacia un regreso a la amabilidad, la escucha y la conversación respetuosa porque nuestros hijos están mirando. , están modelando nuestro comportamiento. Y tenemos la obligación con ellos de establecer un tono esperanzador, un tono amable, un tono respetuoso, de tratarse unos a otros con consideración y gracia. Y esa sería mi varita mágica.

 

Jessica Crate
Me encanta. Tan poderoso y solo sabes tener eso que amas eso. La gente sabe que vienen a Park City y van a experimentar lo que me encanta llamar una ciudad distintiva, y conocer a personas increíbles como usted. Ahora tenemos a la Cámara de Comercio como nuestro patrocinador principal, y estamos muy emocionados de asociarnos con ellos para avanzar no solo con nuestro podcast de video, sino también con Communities That Care. Hablemos un poco más sobre esa asociación y cómo la cámara te ha ayudado con tu trabajo. Y cómo se ve eso en el futuro.

 

María Christa Smith
Gracias Jess, la cámara es un socio tan importante. Nuestra comunidad empresarial está en el corazón de nuestra comunidad. No está separado de nuestra comunidad. Está integrado dentro de él, ya sean sus propietarios o empleados o ya sabes, los edificios de ladrillo y cemento a los que tú y yo vamos todos los días. Nuestra comunidad empresarial es parte integral de nuestro sentido de comunidad, quiénes somos y cómo prosperamos. Y creo que las empresas tienen una oportunidad única y un papel que desempeñar en el fomento de la conexión y el bienestar de los jóvenes y en el trabajo de prevención, ya sea teniendo en cuenta que los productos que ofrecen brindan oportunidades para que los jóvenes aprendan habilidades y crezcan en sus vida empresarial y profesional. Existe una oportunidad increíble para la tutoría. Y estoy realmente encantado de que Jennifer Wessel Hoff sea la nueva directora ejecutiva y presidenta de la Cámara de Comercio, porque trae consigo una gran experiencia en Tucson. No, discúlpeme de Sedona, Arizona, como su ex presidente de su cámara en torno al turismo sostenible. Y en el fondo el turismo sustentable pide, los que vienen aquí para cuidar el lugar que están visitando, tan profundamente como todos lo cuidamos, esos somos los que estamos aquí. Y entonces hay un entendimiento en el corazón del turismo sostenible, sobre la importancia de la comunidad que vive aquí y el entorno natural que está aquí, y los niños que están aquí en la comunidad. Y realmente me encanta que tengamos un presidente que pueda unir estas cosas en lugar de, ya sabes, lo que he visto en el pasado, que ha sido negocios aquí y la comunidad está aquí, ¿no? Y tienen intereses separados. Ahora tenemos intereses compartidos. Por eso, creo que el generoso patrocinio de este podcast por parte de la Cámara es una prueba de su compromiso y cuidado por nuestra comunidad y del deseo de fomentar este, este bienestar en toda nuestra comunidad. Por eso estoy muy emocionado con este primer paso con ellos y ver dónde podemos llevarlo juntos. Este es solo el comienzo de las cosas buenas.



Jessica Crate
Entonces es tan emocionante. Y es tan increíble tener una comunidad integral tan increíble para poder llegar a Connect, ya sabes, elevar, inspirar y ayudar a otros a seguir teniendo éxito y prosperando. Por último, pero no menos importante, Mary Christa, ¿cuál es tu legado, una cita, un mantra, algo que te gustaría dejar con nuestros invitados y espectadores hoy?

 

María Christa Smith
Bueno, un legado, ya sabes, hay un dicho que dice que plantamos árboles cuya forma nunca veremos. Y yo es mi legado. Como saben, no hago esto por mí, ni siquiera por mis propios hijos. Pero lo hago para las generaciones venideras. Y para la base que estamos sentando para su salud y bienestar y que cuando nazcan dentro de 100 años, dentro de 1000 años, mirarán hacia atrás y dirán, ya sabes, esta comunidad pensó en nosotros y se preocupó. acerca de nosotros y creó este mundo en el que nacemos con pensamiento, amor y coraje. Así que espero ser una pequeña parte de la creación de ese legado.

 

Jessica Crate
Solo piensen en que aquellos de ustedes que sintonizan, saben que las semillas que están plantando ahora pueden proporcionar sombra para las generaciones venideras me dan escalofríos, tan poderosos y con un efecto dominó tan asombroso y, ya saben, el legado y la vida que ustedes ”. estás liderando y saliendo. Así que muchas gracias, Mary Krista y aquellos de ustedes que sintonizan. Muchas gracias por acompañarnos en nuestros lunes de salud mental. Un podcast de video es CTC Summit County, y en nombre de nuestra directora ejecutiva, Mary Christa, Mike y yo, así como de la Cámara de Comercio. Nos gustaría agradecerle por sintonizarnos, compartir esto y conectarse. Puede encontrar un enlace a todos nuestros podcasts en CTC summit county.org, así como en nuestra página de Facebook. Por lo tanto, continúe sintonizando y compartiendo esto mientras continuamos brindando y brindando apoyo con recursos. Así que gracias de nuevo. Y que tengas un día maravilloso. Adiós por ahora

Upcoming Events