Mental Health Mondays with Ben Anderson: Song Summit

Aug 10, 2021 | Mental Health Mondays

Ben Anderson is a self-described hillbilly from Middle Tennessee. The son of a music minister, Ben was moved by the choir early on but turned to Rock & Roll for his musical salvation. He bought his first bass guitar when he was 12 and started a Grateful Dead inspired jam band at 20. With a penchant for psychedelia and excess, Ben was a classic functioning dysfunction. After studying law near the waves of Malibu, Ben managed a remarkably successful career as a trial lawyer before realizing his addictions were killing him and voiding his soul. He started the Park City Song Summit as a way to celebrate his passion for music and mission to bring clarity and normalcy to the struggles musicians and artists face around mental health and dependency.

From this discussion:
https://parkcitysongsummit.com 

 

 

 

Jessica Crate
Welcome Hello and welcome to mental health Mondays a Communities That Care video podcast discussing mental health. I am Jessica Craig overson, a visionary spokeswoman for CTC, and I’m excited to be here at CTC Summit County. Our vision is truly a world of connection, vitality and well being where kids and families thrive. And our mission is to collaboratively improve the lives of youth and their families by fostering a culture of health through prevention. So, at CTC, we have a saying called connection is prevention. And so in the spirit of community connection, we are delighted, absolutely honored to have our featured guest today, Ben Anderson on with us, Ben, thank you so much for joining us. Ben is a self described country boy from Middle Tennessee, the son of a music minister then was moved by the choir early on, but turned to rock and roll for his music salvation and he’s gonna get into this. You bought his first bass guitar when he was 12 and started a Grateful Dead inspired jam band at 20. With a pension for psychedelia, and x Xs Ben was a classic functioning dysfunction. And those of you tuning in, probably can relate. After studying law near the waves Malibu, Ben managed a remarkably successful career as a trial lawyer before realizing his addictions, were killing him and voiding his soul. So he has started the Park City song summit as a way to celebrate his passion for music and mission to bring clarity and normalcy to the struggles musicians and artists face around mental health and dependency. So, Ben, what a bio, we are so stoked to have you here today. And as someone who has bet around your venues, Ben to the song summit, I’m excited to learn more how it’s evolved. And to really dive in today, you know, we’ve got a lot to cover. So let’s just start off with, you know, tell us a little bit more about yourself. And you know, why you started the song summit, and what inspired you to create this here in Park City.

 

Ben Anderson
Thank you, Jessica. And thank you so much for having me on the show today. And really, thank you for the mission that CDC has, you guys do a wonderful job. And so, you know, we we all are in this together. And I think that, you know, especially in the last year, and as we’re seeing now, isolation and feeling alone and and, you know, some of our some of our deepest problems with fear and panic, and anxiety, and worry, and depression, they all get turned up to a higher level when we are dealing with something on such a global scale. And so I appreciate the hard work that CDC is doing in the mental health space, and especially with our youth, you know, I was a young person growing up in a small town in Tennessee, and I always wanted to prove myself to be something bigger, I suppose into, quote, unquote, get out of the small town that basically was, you know, farms and factories and things like that. And so come to find out a lot of those roots and values that I learned back then were really, really important. But I was someone who was always looking for something bigger and bolder and better things like that. And that can be a positive and it can also be a negative. So, you know, as I as I went on through my life, and I went to undergrad, and then I went to law school, and I started being a practicing lawyer, and I started to have children and things like that, um, I was also someone that you loved loved music. And as part of that, unfortunately, I’m the disease of addiction and mental health were things that I began to struggle with, but did not treat I treated them but with all of the wrong indications, and all of the wrong treatment modalities. So I was someone who found myself living almost a dual life, right, I was this, you know, successful trial lawyer on the one hand, and trying to be a good dad and a good friend and a good husband on the one hand, and at the same time, failing miserably when it came to dealing with my demons and, you know, my addictions. So, ultimately, as is often the case, they got the better of me, they started to ruin my relationships, my professional relationships, my personal relationships, my family relationships. And, you know, thankfully, there were people who stood in the gap for me, and I was able to get the help that I needed. And, you know, I’m grateful that wow, yeah, I just got emotional. I just realized in four days, I will celebrate 14 years of sobriety and recovery. So Wow, I almost had we not had this. That would have been with being in the middle of song somebody would have been maybe something that I had to really pinch myself and realize, so I am so grateful to be in recovery and I’m so grateful to all those who stood by I mean, um, and, you know, I moved to Park City with my wife and thought that this would be a place that I would retire. And that I would do what, you know, I guess the stereotypical retirees do, I would go off, I would fish, I would hike, I would bike, you know, I would see. And I would wake up late, and I’d go to the gym whenever I wanted to. And for a short period of time I did that. But I’m a music lover, I’m a musician, I still play in that same band that, that I started way back when, when I was 20. And back, we just played two shows here in Park City. But you know, being able to do things in recovery, that I couldn’t understand why I couldn’t do before, and the promises and the realizations that you get in sober living, you know, we’re not perfect, but we understand our imperfections a lot better. And we can hopefully, you know, build appropriate boundaries and do things that are more, you know, productive and healthy with our lives. And so one of those things I wanted to do was to give back through the power of song, the celebration of musicians and songwriting and use that as a as a platform, if you will, to have inclusivity inclusivity for you know, those with mental health challenges, those with addiction recovery challenges, members of our, you know, LGBTQ plus community as well as persons of color that you know, we are all have the same flesh and blood, we all have heart and lungs, and toes And eyes, you know, we were all the same and but we all have different challenges. And some of us have more than others, based on things that are going on in society. And one of those is I wanted to use Park City song summit as a vehicle to, you know, de stigmatize mental health and addiction. You know, I often talk about this, as you know, I’ve had dear friends and family members who’ve had cancer, and in particular females in my family that, you know, they’ve had breast cancer and things like that. And I know that when I was growing up, the people were, they would mumble cancer under their voice, right? Like, it was some horrible thing to talk about. And now we’re able to have, you know, the NFL wearing pink, and, you know, save the Tatas. And so all these wonderful things around like, you know, bringing a voice and a megaphone to it and raising funds for it and making people not feel isolated and alone and, and like they had a support group and that people are out there actively working to find a cure. Um, you know, with mental health and addiction, this has been something that’s been like, Oh, well, that’s just a choice, or why does he have any reason to be depressed? Or what are they anxious about? And so there’s this reeducation that I that I’m so happy to see, etc, and others are working with the community on especially at the youth level, because, you know, the cigarette companies used to get to the youth by grade creating candy cigarettes in a more benevolent way, organizations like CTC and others can hopefully get to our youth before they end up being like me, you know, someone that’s in their 40s that is still trying to recover from mental health and addiction issues. So that’s why that’s one of the reasons song summit was created, it was also created, because our artists and our audience alike deserve a chance to dig dig deep into a lot of these issues. But also, other things that are, you know, comedy and painting and spoken word and poetry and other things that make our artists tick things that ignite them and energize them. But the more connection and community we can have, through, um, you know, artists coming together and collaborating and having this intimacy with the, with the art with the artist, in learning more about them through these in depth conversations. That’s something that’s really cool. That then you can see the artist on stage after you’ve heard them speak and have a conversation like we’re having today to learn more about them. And then that way, when they sing the songs, or we hear them on our Spotify playlist, or, you know, on our vinyl, we know more about that song or that human and what the trajectory of their life was the challenges they faced, and maybe still be facing. And so, to me, it’s so much more than music is so much more than a festival where bands just come into town and they play 75 minutes and they leave. This is really about having our community come together, both as audience goers that all of us with our bumps and warts and all of our challenges, and going that there’s other people like us out there, and we don’t have to be alone. And we don’t have to lose people to suicide and overdose and untreated mental illness, that there that there are resources. So I love to say that we want to use our megaphone in whatever small way we can to to bring awareness to organizations like CTC as well as to do things that raise funds for them because, like anything, there are businesses there are salaries to be paid, and funding for organizations that deal in the mental health and addiction recovery. space has dwindled so much that it really falls to oftentimes the private sector to help bolster that, and that’s, you know, I didn’t need to get out of retirement. On the one hand, I loved waking up late and going to the gym and golfing and hiking and skiing. But I feel like it’s such a privilege to wake up every day and to find new ways to try to maybe in some small way, stand in that gap that someone needs and lend out a helping hand. So that they might be able to live, you know, a better life. And, and so that they may be able to do what I did, which is, I really got a second lease on live. But I only did that because there was help out there. So that’s, that’s more of why I did it and who I am. And I’m just thrilled that September 8 through 12, we’ll be here with a lot of people in town, and many of our artists are in recovery. Many of them are, you know, struggle with mental health, or they have struggled with mental health challenges. And it’s really good to hear from others and be inspired by them that if they can do it, we can do it.

 

Jessica Crate
100% Well, first of all, thank you for sharing, thank you for following your passion, and for stepping up into not only your passion, and the responsibility that it entails that for bringing other people along with you. And you know, we all know that music heals the soul, but it’s, it’s those stories in the real life that connects to your audience and, and just being a person who’s been to the song summit before, I’m excited to see this year as well and to be a part of just the journey and evolution of this because it is so so powerful just because it takes a village, right. And it does require a lot of people to come around you to help you succeed, to get out of that. That other way of living and to get into a new way, and a new path. And so I love that song summit focuses on mental health and substance use prevention, because we’re all about prevention and recovery here at CDC. And I know you are too. So can you share a little bit more about why you’re passionate about bringing forth the conversation about mental health at song summit this year especially?

 

Ben Anderson
Well, you know, with with, I mean, I am, I’m so passionate, and I’m so thrilled to be able to do something that I believe is very unique across the country, you don’t see many folks that take a TED talk or South by Southwest or Aspen Institute format, combine that with the live music performance, but also to raise awareness for and to really address these, you know, a number of things that are going on our society that people need our help with, right. And so to me, it is a unique concept. And it is one that perhaps we’ve needed for a while and that is oftentimes it feels like to me and I love music, I love festivals, I love all kinds of different types of events. But it feels like we’re taking taking taking from the artist instead of providing them an opportunity to give something back. So we ask all of our artists to come and be artists in residence, some can, some can’t just because of touring schedules or whatnot, but we asked them to come into town with their families, so that this can be a respite for them for the mind, body and soul. so that they could do daily yoga and meditation with us so that we have 12 step meetings every morning so that we have sober green rooms and non sober green rooms that we have amazing non alcoholic beverage alternatives everywhere we call them rock tails, so they’re non alcoholic cocktails. Um, and so it is a it is a platform of mine, it is a soapbox of mine, to say we don’t need, we can include people who don’t come to concerts and don’t want to drink alcoholic beverages, we can provide safe space and have mental health practitioners on site which we will who are available. Um, you know, in speaking with some of the early festivals that have gone on the summer, the tents where they have mental health professionals available and their areas for 12 step meetings have been flooded with people who just they’re they’re anxious, or they have other fears around, you know, being back out in public being back at gatherings and things like that. And so, in these, you know, post 22 but still COVID times, especially with all of the reports going on in the news now about you know, spikes and delta variant and things like that. We think now more than ever, it’s important for us to provide a safety net as best we can and highlight other safety net resources that are available to people because we’re far from out of this thing. And now more than ever, resources for you know, prevention and and recovery are necessary. So it’s it’s a that the probably will stand as the toughest year I’ve ever had in trying to put on a new style event in at a time when all A lot of the a lot of the touring has pushed to August, September, October, a lot of the festivals have moved into the same time. So I’m in a very, very busy lane with a lot of biggies out there that have been around for half a century or quarter century. And so it’s very, very difficult. But I, my my, you know, my, my faith is unwavering. My, my energy is unstoppable. And I will continue to fight this fight, even in a tough year to do it. You know, it’s tough to sell tickets, when people are, you know, concerned about their mental health, their physical health, what are they getting themselves into, it’s tough to sell tickets in a time where there’s so many events going on in a very dense time period. But you know, we’ve overcome life or death with mental health and addiction. So this is, this is nothing different, right? This is just facing a challenge, taking it a little at a time handling what we can, and realizing that the Serenity Prayer is, is, you know, as relevant as ever, for me to end in my daily meditations that we control we can and the rest we leave to the universe, but but we are led by our hearts at song summit. And we feel like that our mission, our passion, our goals, and what we strive to do, are of the utmost importance. And so they say build it, and they will come, I think it’s build it with the right foundation with the right purpose, and come or not come sooner or later, they will. And sooner or later people will buy into this concept that we can do more for people in the live music sector, both the artists and audience alike. So that is, that’s what we’re doing here. And I take people’s mental health in these times, very, very seriously. I take their physical health very seriously. And I’m doing everything I can in the coming weeks to ensure that everything that we’re doing at song summit is going to have best practices. And we are watching the situation very closely. I’m on the phone with government officials and health officials and other concert promoters and I’m doing everything I can to make sure that as we roll out our protocols and and what our requirements are going to be for our attendees realize that I’m only doing this with with people’s health and safety and not just not just their physical health. You know, Jason Isbell, recently in an NPR article talked about, you know, not enough has been mentioned about people’s mental health, both the audience and the artists, and everyone supporting the artists and the staff, my staff at these things, you know, I have to take that in consideration that there are people who are challenged like me, that need to know that they’re there, I’m using every step I can to be as safe as possible. And so I’m going to do that, but I’m going to do it, not because I, you know, it’s obviously not helping my pocketbook, to to, you know, make tighter restrictions and look at my capacities and things like that. But that’s not what it’s all about. For me, it’s about keeping people healthy and safe and, and creating a sustainable environment for years to come. I want to keep, I want this to be going and helping people with mental health and addiction issues, and other societal issues that are going on out there a platform to talk about our differences and to come together. I want people to be doing that long after I’m in the ground, as my grandma would say tasting dirt. I want others to be carrying on in the song summit tradition, and working with partners like cc CTC to make sure we’re helping everybody we can. And that’s my, that’s my daily mission. And if I have a passion in life and a purpose in life that God has given me then, if this is it, then I’m happy man.

 

Jessica Crate
I love that, well, I love that you’re following your passion, you’re bringing in the faith, and you’re doing your due diligence. And that takes a lot of work that adds more stress to your life. And so I do want to get into and dive into  some action items and some tools and tips and resources that you use that you can recommend for our viewers. But before we do, one of the major topics that we’re dealing with here, and especially in Park City is living in a resort town. So here are Communities That Care, we’re focused on addressing, you know, the unique risk factors for mental health and substance use that arises from living in a resort town. So my question for you is do you think that resort town living has an influence on our mental health and the rates of substance use? And you know, how do you go about addressing that?

 

Ben Anderson
Well, it’s a good question, and it’s a tough question. And so I appreciate that. Um, I think that there’s, I didn’t I wasn’t raised in a resort town. So I don’t have the experience to be able to say what it was like to be raised here. You know, I was raised in a tiny farm town in Tennessee. And so what I found out through my, through my recovery is that, you know, there are no geographical fixes, I thought I could leave LA and go to Cleveland, Ohio, and I would be able to leave all of the craziness that I was doing on the West Coast behind. And, and I soon found out when I went into recovery years later in Cleveland, you know, one of the obviously hot beds and ground zero for you know, Dr. Bob and Bill W, is that we are where we are. And we get to where we get for a lot of different reasons, right. And so, I do believe that in general, though, the youth of today, be it in a resort town, or in Omaha, Nebraska, or in my hometown of Gallatin, Tennessee, I believe they are faced with particular challenges. And those are, you know, social media, and the internet, we just didn’t have that when you and I were being, you know, when we were coming up, and to constantly being compared to others, or comparing ourselves to others and feeling less than, and not thinking will ever be good enough. And I’ll never be pretty enough, skinny enough. Black enough, wide enough, you know, you know, straight enough for anybody to accept me, is a very difficult thing for an adult, much less for the youth. And so I feel for them today, I do believe there’s a unique challenge there. Whether or not being in a resort town itself has its particular challenges, I do leave that to you and your professionals on that front. But I, you know, I was raised in a little town and coming up in a town that, yes, it’s small by population, but the world comes here. And there’s athletics and there’s, you know, a lot of beautiful people here, and there’s folks who are out and they look like they were chiseled from marble, you know, we we don’t all we aren’t, are born of that DNA, right? constantly wanting to put ourselves into some conforming box is very difficult for us not to be tempted to do and so I think that especially in a town, you know, I spent a lot of time in Manhattan Beach, California, very similar, this, you know, chiseled bodies, you know, gorgeous people on the beach, playing volleyball, I was not some chiseled body that it was, you know, I and so I could imagine growing up there, you know, one of the reasons I was happy not to raise my kids in that environment, because I thought, Oh, my gosh, this is such la was such a, you know, images, everything kind of thing. But they had their own challenges in Cleveland, Ohio being raised, right, you can’t escape the internet, you can’t escape social media. And I don’t think we can escape the things that we either come into are born into whatever that may be societal factors, or genetic factors that lead us to be someone who has mental health and addiction challenges. Um, I’m pretty convinced that I was, you know, that part of that I was born with but you know, I do a lot of work on childhood trauma and family of origin trauma. And in this phase of my recovery, I’m starting to look really closely at the whys and to be able to be curious about my feelings, my thoughts, my words, my actions, and what the the genesis of that was, and how I can trace that back to things that went on in my childhood and in my youth. And so, being in a town like this, it’s not any easier, but in some would say, maybe it’s not any harder than the youth across the country. I know that I feel like it’s harder than it was when I was raised. And I feel like that if I came in at a that I was in a town like this that has so many things that are available to them, that it would have been certainly added extra challenge. The tools that I use to go to that part of your question is, um, I try, okay, so it’s all they say, the yoga and meditation, they call it yoga practice or meditation practice, right? So some days, I do better at my practice than others. But if I can just find that time in the morning to do some yoga and stretching and to spend some time meditating and getting some good breath work in. It’s very, very helpful to me, I have a daily gratitude list that I do with a dear friend of mine in New Orleans. And that is something that is very, very helpful. You know, there was an old him when I was growing up called Count your blessings, right? It’s Count your blessings, name them one by one, Count your many blessings, see what God has done. Right? So that’s just something that I heard growing up, right, come to find out in the New Age, in the progressive age, in the age of more of yoga and meditation and more, more, you know, secular ways that we would maybe look at prayer and meditation and things like that. That old hymn rings true for me now because a daily gratitude list is just Just that, like if you begin to really count the things that are going on that are positive for you, and the things that you’re grateful for going down to the very basic of I’m so grateful today that I woke up alive. I’m so grateful that I woke up sober, I’m so grateful that I woke up with people who love me and that I can love safely. I’m so grateful that I know now more about boundaries, and being more in tune with my inner child and my inner self, and being able to tap into that I am I am very open and spiritual on this new journey about receiving and trying to practice more equanimity, and to really think about others and have more empathy, and to understand and try to regulate better when people are coming at me or others with anger, or whatever, to be able to look at that and go, that’s their 12 year old self that was hurt at that time, that’s their 18 year old self that was abused, or, you know, saw a train wreck or, you know, was was bullied or didn’t get the attention they wanted. So, the ability for me now through therapy, my weekly therapy sessions with my therapist, is very, very helpful to do what I’m doing now with song summit is a helpful form of service for me, so that I can give back in and therefore even receive twice and what I’ve given, right, so there’s a selfish part of recovery. And I say selfish in a more benevolent way, they say, you know, you can’t, if you don’t give it away, this helps me by giving it away to keep my sobriety. So prayer is very important to me, meditation, yoga, stretching, breathwork, my daily gratitude lists, and connecting with other people in recovery on a regular basis, are just some of the things that keep me solid. And the readings that I do, very, very important to me, I could live to 150, and still realize that I’m still learning more and trying to grow. And that there’s still more that I don’t know that I do know.

 

Jessica Crate
Hundred percent, well, you’ve touched on a lot of great things. And I love that you hit on the geographical aspect of living in a resort town because it is and does start in the six inches between your ears. And so if we can just start there. And you know, like many quotes, and you know, authors say like, if you can correct your mind, the rest of the world falls into place. So love that you brought forward those action items about yoga, meditation, the practice of gratitude, you know, my husband and I were talking about that this morning, and the little songs that count your blessings, things that I’m instilling in our newborn. So love these tips in tool. So hopefully, if you are tuning in, you are taking notes, because Ben is dropping some amazing nuggets right now. And love these resources. You know, one of my favorite questions is that if you could wave your magic wand, what would you like to see or create in our community?

 

Ben Anderson
Um, oh, no, they’re great question on difficult one, I would love to see more connection with our Latinx community, and the mental health challenges that they have. And, in particular, you know, in a town where they are relied upon heavily for our services, I feel like that they are sometimes treated as an invisible member of our society. So I would love to see more resources and more conversation and more inclusivity around our Latinx community, I would love to see more. And so I would then, you know, rope into that addressing persons of color in general, that we that we do more in allowing them to become their best selves, and that we address this thing that’s been swept under the rug for a long time, I feel like and that is that they are they are productive, loving, caring, family oriented, oriented members of our of our community, who we rely on to do the things that others may not do. And I think that that needs to be addressed, I would love to see that wave that one addressed better. And I would if I could wave my wand twice, I would say the same is true for our LGBTQ plus community. And the mental health challenges in both of those parts of our community would would be something that I would love to see is is being addressed, and is being fostered and nurtured. And so those are very, very important to me. And in this to see that I would love it. If I could wave my wand the third time it would be that we’re addressing youth of all colors of all of all genders of all sexual preferences that all of our youth would feel more connection with one another and with themselves and that they would be able to get the resources they need and that they could live healthier lives when it comes to the mental health and and their comparisons to others. And more empathy for one another, um, I just I, it hurts me to know that there are people who go to bed every night, crying tears and wondering, you know, and thinking about, you know, they’re, they’re no good and they shouldn’t be here anymore. It hurts me deeply to think about that. And whether they are a person of color or someone from LGBTQ plus, or they’re a youth, that they feel like no one is listening to them, no one hears them, and no one loves them, breaks my heart. And so if I had a big old magic wand, I would wave it and just say you are loved, you aren’t alone. And we need to do more to help you, what can we do? That would be.

 

Jessica Crate
You know, I can feel your heart on here. So those of you tuning in, you know, I’m sure you can feel Ben’s heart, and ours, as we echo that, and just know that you’re tuning in here, you are loved, you are appreciated, and you have a purpose and a passion in life. So, Ben, you’re an amazing soul and a wonderful human, you’re making me emotional. Last question, you know, how does CTC help you in your work?

 

Ben Anderson
By doing what you’re doing right now, and by helping me understand better how I need to be messaging, I want to learn more, I need to learn more, I want to be part of these conversations around best practices, and better thinking about how we can address these things that I mentioned a minute ago. And to have people know that they are special, and that they are loved. And so whatever I can do from song summit, to work with CTC, to be a megaphone to be a partner, to help raise awareness and funds, but also to be educated so that I am not living in an echo chamber. And then I’m not tone deaf, with the real issues that are out there. Because I think that if we allow in, we create the platform for our youth, to tell us what they need, instead of us to continue to tell the youth what they need. And I’m not suggesting that CTC doesn’t do this, I think this is like more people need to be doing what you are doing. But we need to listen to them and let them help us set agendas, let them help us set what what our goal should be, rather than and the same is true with persons of color and LGBTQ plus community. I look at me, I am a white, heterosexual male, right? I don’t understand. I don’t know what they live with. But I want to better understand it. And to have, you know, more mindfulness around that. And so that’s what CGC could do with me is to have an ongoing partnership. And to let me you know, give me information to read, tell me how I could get out there and help in some way. And to be better informed myself as to what the real issues are, and the better ways to address them. I’m a believer that for every every problem, there are many, many solutions. But if we don’t have the right tools in the toolkit or reaching in the wrong toolkit, our solutions often fail. And that is why the way I’ve described myself is that I need to know what the toolkit is the better tools in them. So that coming from my own background, I can remove that from the equation and put myself in other people’s moccasins better and understand what their true needs are and how I can help that. And it’s not always just writing a check. It’s rolling up your sleeves and trying to make a difference. And so that’s how you could help me and my organization

 

Jessica Crate
Hundred percent well we are excited to be partnering with you and collaborating together because it does take a village and we are so looking forward to the song summit coming up next month. And so grateful for your work bet and it has been both an honor and a privilege to be on here with you today. And before I let you go, I asked everyone nice and you know just if you have a quote a legacy a mantra What would you like to leave our viewers with? Um, you are not alone. We are everywhere. Love that powerful. You are such a beautiful soul and I am so grateful to have you in not only in Park City in our community, but you know, just as a resource. So those of you tuning in, thank you so much for joining us today on our mental health Mondays a video with podcast of CTC Summit County. So on behalf of our executive director, Mary Krista Smith and myself, Jessica Craig overson. We thank you so much for tuning in. You can find a link to all of our podcasts on our blog at CTC summit county.org. And we look forward to seeing you each and every Monday. So plug in, take action. Don’t be a stranger. We’re all in this together. And like Ben said, You are not alone. So make it a great day. And we’ll talk to you all soon. Bye for now.

“Utilizamos un servicio automatizado para esta traducción. Somos conscientes de que puede haber errores y agradecemos su comprensión”.


Jessica Crate
Bienvenidos Hola y bienvenidos a los lunes de salud mental, un video podcast de Comunidades que se preocupan sobre la salud mental. Soy Jessica Craig Overson, una vocera visionaria de CTC, y estoy emocionada de estar aquí en CTC Summit County. Nuestra visión es verdaderamente un mundo de conexión, vitalidad y bienestar donde los niños y las familias prosperen. Y nuestra misión es mejorar de manera colaborativa la vida de los jóvenes y sus familias fomentando una cultura de salud a través de la prevención. Entonces, en CTC, tenemos un dicho llamado conexión es prevención. Y así, en el espíritu de conexión con la comunidad, estamos encantados, absolutamente honrados de tener a nuestro invitado destacado hoy, Ben Anderson, con nosotros, Ben, muchas gracias por acompañarnos. Ben se describe a sí mismo como un chico de campo de Middle Tennessee, hijo de un ministro de música que luego fue conmovido por el coro desde el principio, pero recurrió al rock and roll para salvar su música y se va a meter en esto. Compró su primer bajo cuando tenía 12 años y comenzó una banda de improvisación inspirada en Grateful Dead a los 20. Con una pensión por psicodelia, y x Xs Ben era una disfunción funcional clásica. Y aquellos de ustedes que sintonizan, probablemente puedan relacionarse. Después de estudiar derecho cerca de las olas de Malibú, Ben logró una carrera notablemente exitosa como abogado litigante antes de darse cuenta de que sus adicciones lo estaban matando y vaciando su alma. Así que ha comenzado la cumbre de canciones de Park City como una forma de celebrar su pasión por la música y su misión de traer claridad y normalidad a las luchas que los músicos y artistas enfrentan en torno a la salud mental y la dependencia. Ben, qué biografía, estamos muy contentos de tenerte aquí hoy. Y como alguien que ha apostado por sus lugares, Ben a la cumbre de la canción, estoy emocionado de saber más sobre cómo ha evolucionado. Y para sumergirnos realmente hoy, tenemos mucho que cubrir. Así que comencemos con, ya sabes, cuéntanos un poco más sobre ti. Y ya sabes, por qué comenzaste la cumbre de la canción y qué te inspiró a crear esto aquí en Park City.



Ben Anderson
Gracias, Jessica. Y muchas gracias por invitarme al programa de hoy. Y realmente, gracias por la misión que tiene el CDC, ustedes hacen un trabajo maravilloso. Y entonces, ya sabes, todos estamos juntos en esto. Y creo que, ya sabes, especialmente en el último año, y como estamos viendo ahora, el aislamiento y la sensación de soledad y, ya sabes, algunos de nuestros problemas más profundos con el miedo, el pánico, la ansiedad y la preocupación. y la depresión, todos se elevan a un nivel más alto cuando estamos lidiando con algo a una escala tan global. Entonces, aprecio el arduo trabajo que los CDC están haciendo en el espacio de la salud mental, y especialmente con nuestra juventud, ya sabes, yo era una persona joven que crecía en un pequeño pueblo de Tennessee, y siempre quise demostrar que era algo. más grande, supongo que en, entre comillas, sin comillas, sal de la pequeña ciudad que básicamente era, ya sabes, granjas y fábricas y cosas así. Y así descubrí muchas de esas raíces y valores que aprendí en ese entonces que eran realmente importantes. Pero yo era alguien que siempre estaba buscando algo más grande, más audaz y mejores cosas como esa. Y eso puede ser positivo y también negativo. Entonces, ya sabes, a medida que seguí adelante con mi vida, fui a la licenciatura, y luego a la escuela de derecho, y comencé a ser un abogado en ejercicio, y comencé a tener hijos y cosas así, um, También era alguien a quien amabas, amaba la música. Y como parte de eso, desafortunadamente, soy la enfermedad de la adicción y la salud mental fueron cosas con las que comencé a luchar, pero no las traté, las traté, sino con todas las indicaciones incorrectas y todas las modalidades de tratamiento incorrectas. Así que fui alguien que se encontró viviendo casi una vida doble, cierto, era este, ya sabes, un abogado litigante exitoso por un lado, y tratando de ser un buen padre y un buen amigo y un buen esposo por un lado. y al mismo tiempo, fracasando miserablemente cuando se trataba de lidiar con mis demonios y, ya sabes, mis adicciones. Entonces, en última instancia, como suele ser el caso, se apoderaron de mí, comenzaron a arruinar mis relaciones, mis relaciones profesionales, mis relaciones personales, mis relaciones familiares. Y, usted sabe, afortunadamente, hubo personas que estuvieron en la brecha por mí, y pude obtener la ayuda que necesitaba. Y, ya sabes, estoy agradecido por ese guau, sí, simplemente me emocioné. Me acabo de dar cuenta de que en cuatro días celebraré 14 años de sobriedad y recuperación. Así que Wow, casi lo tenía, no teníamos esto. Eso habría sido estando en medio de una canción, alguien habría sido tal vez algo de lo que realmente tuve que pellizcarme y darme cuenta, así que estoy muy agradecido de estar en recuperación y estoy muy agradecido con todos los que estuvieron a mi lado, quiero decir. , um, y, ya sabes, me mudé a Park City con mi esposa y pensé que este sería un lugar donde me retiraría. Y que haría lo que, ya sabes, supongo que hacen los jubilados estereotipados, me iría, pescaría, iría de excursión, andaría en bicicleta, ya sabes, vería. Y me levantaba tarde e iba al gimnasio cuando quería. Y por un corto período de tiempo lo hice. Pero soy un amante de la música, soy músico, todavía toco en la misma banda que empecé cuando tenía 20 años. Y atrás, acabamos de tocar en dos shows aquí en Park City. Pero ya sabes, siendo capaz de hacer cosas en recuperación, que no podía entender por qué no podía hacer antes, y las promesas y las realizaciones que obtienes en una vida sobria, ya sabes, no somos perfectos, pero nosotros entender nuestras imperfecciones mucho mejor. Y con suerte, ya sabes, podemos establecer límites apropiados y hacer cosas que sean más, ya sabes, productivas y saludables con nuestras vidas. Entonces, una de esas cosas que quería hacer era devolver a través del poder de la canción, la celebración de los músicos y la composición y usar eso como una plataforma, si se quiere, para tener inclusividad, inclusividad para ustedes saben, aquellos con problemas mentales. desafíos de salud, aquellos con desafíos de recuperación de adicciones, miembros de nuestra, ya sabes, comunidad LGBTQ plus, así como personas de color que ya conoces, todos tenemos la misma carne y sangre, todos tenemos corazón y pulmones, dedos de los pies y ojos , ya sabes, todos éramos iguales pero todos tenemos diferentes desafíos. Y algunos de nosotros tenemos más que otros, según las cosas que están sucediendo en la sociedad. Y uno de ellos es que quería usar la Cumbre de canciones de Park City como un vehículo para, ya sabes, desestigmatizar la salud mental y la adicción. Sabes, a menudo hablo de esto, como sabes, he tenido amigos queridos y familiares que han tenido cáncer, y en particular mujeres en mi familia que, ya sabes, han tenido cáncer de mama y cosas así. . Y sé que cuando yo estaba creciendo, la gente murmuraba cáncer bajo su voz, ¿verdad? Como si fuera algo horrible de lo que hablar. Y ahora podemos tener, ya sabes, la NFL vestida de rosa y, ya sabes, salvar a los Tatas. Y entonces todas estas cosas maravillosas alrededor como, ya sabes, traer una voz y un megáfono a y recaudar fondos para ello y hacer que la gente no se sienta aislada y sola y como si tuvieran un grupo de apoyo y que la gente esté trabajando activamente para encontrar una cura. Um, ya sabes, con la salud mental y la adicción, esto ha sido algo como, Oh, bueno, eso es solo una elección, o ¿por qué tiene alguna razón para estar deprimido? ¿O de qué están ansiosos? Y entonces está esta reeducación que estoy tan feliz de ver, etc., y otros están trabajando con la comunidad, especialmente a nivel juvenil, porque, ya sabes, las compañías de cigarrillos solían llegar a los jóvenes por grado creando dulces. cigarrillos de una manera más benévola, organizaciones como CTC y otras, con suerte, pueden llegar a nuestra juventud antes de que terminen siendo como yo, ya sabes, alguien de 40 años que todavía está tratando de recuperarse de problemas de salud mental y adicción. Por eso, esa es una de las razones por las que se creó Song Summit, también se creó, porque nuestros artistas y nuestra audiencia merecen la oportunidad de profundizar en muchos de estos temas. Pero también, otras cosas que son, ya sabes, comedia y pintura y palabra hablada y poesía y otras cosas que hacen que nuestros artistas marquen cosas que los encienden y los energizan. Pero cuanta más conexión y comunidad podamos tener, a través de, um, ya sabes, artistas que se unen y colaboran y tienen esta intimidad con, con el arte con el artista, para aprender más sobre ellos a través de estas conversaciones en profundidad. Eso es algo realmente genial. Que luego puedas ver al artista en el escenario después de haberlos escuchado hablar y tener una conversación como la que estamos teniendo hoy para aprender más sobre ellos. Y de esa manera, cuando cantan las canciones, o las escuchamos en nuestra lista de reproducción de Spotify, o, ya sabes, en nuestro vinilo, sabemos más sobre esa canción o ese humano y cuál fue la trayectoria de su vida, los desafíos que enfrentaron. , y tal vez todavía se esté enfrentando. Y entonces, para mí, es mucho más que la música es mucho más que un festival donde las bandas simplemente llegan a la ciudad, tocan 75 minutos y se van. Se trata realmente de que nuestra comunidad se una, tanto como asistentes de la audiencia que todos nosotros con nuestros bultos y verrugas y todos nuestros desafíos, y decir que hay otras personas como nosotros, y no tenemos que estar solos. Y no tenemos que perder gente por suicidio y sobredosis y enfermedades mentales no tratadas, ahí que hay recursos. Así que me encanta decir que queremos usar nuestro megáfono de la manera más pequeña que podamos para concienciar a organizaciones como CTC, así como para hacer cosas que recauden fondos para ellas porque, como todo, hay negocios, hay salarios por hacer. pagado y financiación para organizaciones que se ocupan de la salud mental y la recuperación de adicciones. el espacio ha disminuido tanto que muchas veces le toca al sector privado ayudar a reforzar eso, y eso es, ya sabes, no necesitaba salir de mi jubilación. Por un lado, me encantaba despertarme tarde e ir al gimnasio y jugar al golf y hacer senderismo y esquiar. Pero siento que es un gran privilegio despertar todos los días y encontrar nuevas formas de intentar, tal vez de alguna manera, permanecer en esa brecha que alguien necesita y echar una mano. Para que puedan vivir, ya sabes, una vida mejor. Y, para que puedan hacer lo que yo hice, es decir, realmente obtuve un segundo contrato de arrendamiento en vivo. Pero solo hice eso porque había ayuda ahí fuera. Así que eso es más por qué lo hice y quién soy. Y estoy emocionado de que del 8 al 12 de septiembre, estaremos aquí con mucha gente en la ciudad y muchos de nuestros artistas se están recuperando. Muchos de ellos, ya sabes, tienen problemas de salud mental o han luchado con problemas de salud mental. Y es realmente bueno escuchar a los demás e inspirarse en ellos que si pueden hacerlo, podemos hacerlo.


Jessica Crate
100% Bueno, en primer lugar, gracias por compartir, gracias por seguir tu pasión y por adentrarte no solo en tu pasión, sino también en la responsabilidad que conlleva de traer a otras personas contigo. Y ya sabes, todos sabemos que la música cura el alma, pero son esas historias de la vida real las que conectan con tu audiencia y, siendo una persona que ha estado en la cumbre de la canción antes, estoy emocionado de ver esto. año también y ser parte del viaje y la evolución de esto porque es tan poderoso solo porque se necesita un pueblo, ¿verdad? Y se requiere que mucha gente se acerque a ti para ayudarte a tener éxito, a salir de eso. Esa otra forma de vivir y adentrarse en una nueva forma, y ​​un nuevo camino. Y por eso me encanta esa cumbre de canciones que se centra en la salud mental y la prevención del consumo de sustancias, porque aquí en los CDC nos centramos en la prevención y la recuperación. Y sé que tú también lo eres. Entonces, ¿puedes compartir un poco más sobre por qué te apasiona sacar a la luz la conversación sobre salud mental en la cumbre de la canción de este año, especialmente?


Ben Anderson
Bueno, ya sabes, con, quiero decir, lo soy, soy tan apasionado y estoy tan emocionado de poder hacer algo que creo que es único en todo el país, no ves a muchas personas que tomar una charla TED o el formato South by Southwest o Aspen Institute, combinar eso con la presentación de música en vivo, pero también para crear conciencia y abordar realmente estas, ya sabes, una serie de cosas que están sucediendo en nuestra sociedad que la gente necesita. ayuda con, correcto. Y para mí, es un concepto único. Y es uno que quizás hemos necesitado por un tiempo y que muchas veces me parece y me encanta la música, me encantan los festivales, me encanta todo tipo de eventos diferentes. Pero se siente como si tomáramos algo del artista en lugar de brindarle la oportunidad de devolver algo. Así que les pedimos a todos nuestros artistas que vengan y sean artistas en residencia, algunos pueden, otros no solo por horarios de gira o todo eso, pero les pedimos que vinieran a la ciudad con sus familias, para que esto pueda ser un respiro para ellos para la mente, el cuerpo y el alma. para que puedan hacer yoga y meditación todos los días con nosotros para que tengamos reuniones de 12 pasos todas las mañanas para que tengamos salas verdes sobrias y salas verdes para no sobrios. son cócteles sin alcohol. Um, y entonces es una plataforma mía, es una caja de jabón mía, para decir que no necesitamos, podemos incluir gente que no viene a conciertos y no quiere tomar bebidas alcohólicas, Podemos proporcionar un espacio seguro y tener profesionales de la salud mental en el lugar, lo cual haremos que estén disponibles. Um, ya sabes, al hablar con algunos de los primeros festivales que se llevaron a cabo en el verano, las carpas donde tienen profesionales de salud mental disponibles y sus áreas para reuniones de 12 pasos se han inundado de personas que simplemente están ansiosas. , o tienen otros miedos alrededor, ya sabes, estar de vuelta en público, estar de vuelta en reuniones y cosas así. Y entonces, en estos, ya sabes, publica 22 pero aún COVID veces, especialmente con todos los informes que están en las noticias ahora sobre tu sabes, picos y variante delta y cosas así. Creemos que ahora más que nunca, es importante para nosotros proporcionar una red de seguridad lo mejor que podamos y destacar otros recursos de la red de seguridad que están disponibles para las personas porque estamos lejos de estar fuera de esto. Y ahora más que nunca, los recursos para que usted sepa, la prevención y la recuperación son necesarios. Así que es probable que sea el año más difícil que he tenido al intentar organizar un evento de estilo nuevo en un momento en el que muchas de las giras se han prolongado hasta agosto, septiembre y octubre. , muchos de los festivales se han trasladado al mismo tiempo. Así que estoy en un carril muy, muy ocupado con muchos problemas que han existido durante medio siglo o un cuarto de siglo. Y entonces es muy, muy difícil. Pero yo, mi, ya sabes, mi, mi fe es inquebrantable. Mi, mi energía es imparable. Y continuaré peleando esta pelea, incluso en un año difícil para hacerlo. Sabes, es difícil vender entradas, cuando la gente está, ya sabes, preocupada por su salud mental, su salud física, en qué se están metiendo, es difícil vender entradas en un momento en el que hay tantos eventos sucediendo en un período de tiempo muy denso. Pero ya sabes, hemos superado la vida o la muerte con la salud mental y la adicción. Entonces esto es, esto no es nada diferente, ¿verdad? Esto es solo enfrentar un desafío, tomarlo poco a poco manejando lo que podemos y darnos cuenta de que la Oración de la Serenidad es, es, ya sabes, tan relevante como siempre, para mí terminar en mis meditaciones diarias que controlamos que podemos. y el resto lo dejamos para el universo, pero nos dejamos llevar por nuestros corazones en la cumbre del canto. Y sentimos que nuestra misión, nuestra pasión, nuestros objetivos y lo que nos esforzamos por hacer son de suma importancia. Y entonces dicen que lo construyan, y vendrán, creo que es construirlo con los cimientos correctos con el propósito correcto, y vendrán o no vendrán tarde o temprano, lo harán. Y tarde o temprano la gente aceptará este concepto de que podemos hacer más por las personas en el sector de la música en vivo, tanto los artistas como la audiencia. Eso es, eso es lo que estamos haciendo aquí. Y me tomo la salud mental de las personas en estos tiempos, muy, muy en serio. Me tomo muy en serio su salud física. Y estoy haciendo todo lo que puedo en las próximas semanas para asegurarme de que todo lo que estamos haciendo en Song Summit tenga las mejores prácticas. Y estamos observando la situación muy de cerca. Estoy hablando por teléfono con funcionarios del gobierno, funcionarios de salud y otros promotores de conciertos y estoy haciendo todo lo posible para asegurarme de que, a medida que implementamos nuestros protocolos y cuáles serán nuestros requisitos para nuestros asistentes, nos damos cuenta de que yo ‘ Solo hago esto con la salud y la seguridad de las personas y no solo con su salud física. Ya sabes, Jason Isbell, recientemente en un artículo de NPR hablado, ya sabes, no hay suficientes Se ha mencionado sobre la salud mental de las personas, tanto la audiencia como los artistas, y todos los que apoyan a los artistas y al personal, mi personal en estas cosas, ya sabes, tengo que tomar eso en consideración que hay personas que tienen desafíos como yo, que Necesito saber que están ahí, estoy usando cada paso que puedo para estar lo más seguro posible. Y entonces voy a hacer eso, pero lo voy a hacer, no porque yo, ya sabes, obviamente no está ayudando a mi bolsillo, para, ya sabes, hacer restricciones más estrictas y mirar mis capacidades y cosas como ese. Pero no se trata de eso. Para mí, se trata de mantener a las personas sanas y seguras y de crear un entorno sostenible durante los próximos años. Quiero mantener, quiero que esto continúe y ayude a las personas con problemas de salud mental y adicción, y otros problemas sociales que están sucediendo, una plataforma para hablar sobre nuestras diferencias y unirnos. Quiero que la gente lo haga mucho tiempo después de que yo esté en el suelo, como diría mi abuela probando tierra. Quiero que otros continúen con la tradición de la cumbre de canciones y que trabajen con socios como cc CTC para asegurarnos de que estamos ayudando a todos los que podamos. Y esa es mi, esa es mi misión diaria. Y si tengo una pasión en la vida y un propósito en la vida que Dios me ha dado, entonces, si es así, entonces soy un hombre feliz.



Jessica Crate
Me encanta eso, bueno, me encanta que sigas tu pasión, que traigas la fe y que estés haciendo tu debida diligencia. Y eso requiere mucho trabajo que agrega más estrés a tu vida. Por eso, quiero entrar y sumergirme en algunos elementos de acción y algunas herramientas, consejos y recursos que utiliza y que puede recomendar a nuestros espectadores. Pero antes de hacerlo, uno de los principales temas que estamos tratando aquí, y especialmente en Park City, es vivir en una ciudad turística. Así que aquí están las comunidades que se preocupan, estamos enfocados en abordar, ya sabes, los factores de riesgo únicos para la salud mental y el uso de sustancias que surgen de vivir en una ciudad turística. Entonces, mi pregunta para usted es ¿cree que la vida en una ciudad turística influye en nuestra salud mental y en las tasas de consumo de sustancias? Y sabes, ¿cómo vas a abordar eso?

 


Ben Anderson
Bueno, es una buena pregunta y es una pregunta difícil. Y por eso lo agradezco. Um, creo que hay, yo no. No me crié en una ciudad turística. Entonces no tengo la experiencia para poder decir cómo fue ser criado aquí. Sabes, me crié en una pequeña ciudad agrícola en Tennessee. Entonces, lo que descubrí a través de mi, a través de mi recuperación es que, ya sabes, no hay arreglos geográficos, pensé que podría dejar Los Ángeles e ir a Cleveland, Ohio, y podría dejar toda la locura que tenía. estaba haciendo en la costa oeste detrás. Y, y pronto descubrí cuando entré en recuperación años más tarde en Cleveland, uno de los lugares obviamente calientes y la zona cero para ustedes saben, el Dr. Bob y Bill W, es que estamos donde estamos. Y llegamos a donde llegamos por muchas razones diferentes, ¿no? Y así, creo que en general, sin embargo, los jóvenes de hoy, ya sea en una ciudad turística, en Omaha, Nebraska o en mi ciudad natal de Gallatin, Tennessee, creo que se enfrentan a desafíos particulares. Y esos son, ya sabes, las redes sociales e Internet, simplemente no teníamos eso cuando tú y yo estábamos, ya sabes, cuando estábamos subiendo, y nos comparábamos constantemente con los demás, o nos comparábamos con los demás. y sentir menos y no pensar será lo suficientemente bueno. Y nunca seré lo suficientemente bonita, lo suficientemente delgada. Lo suficientemente negro, lo suficientemente ancho, ya sabes, ya sabes, lo suficientemente recto como para que alguien me acepte, es algo muy difícil para un adulto, y mucho menos para un joven. Y lo que siento por ellos hoy, creo que hay un desafío único allí. Ya sea que estar en una ciudad turística tenga o no sus desafíos particulares, se lo dejo a usted y a sus profesionales en ese frente. Pero yo, ya sabes, me crié en un pueblo pequeño y vine a un pueblo que, sí, es pequeño en población, pero el mundo viene aquí. Y hay atletismo y hay, ya sabes, mucha gente hermosa aquí, y hay gente que está fuera y parece que fueron cincelados en mármol, ya sabes, no somos todo lo que no somos, nacimos de eso. ADN, ¿verdad? constantemente querer ponernos en alguna caja conforme es muy difícil para nosotros no sentir la tentación de hacerlo y por eso creo que especialmente en una ciudad, ya sabes, pasé mucho tiempo en Manhattan Beach, California, muy similar, esto, ya sabes, cuerpos cincelados, ya sabes, gente hermosa en la playa, jugando voleibol, yo no era un cuerpo cincelado que era, ya sabes, yo, así que podía imaginarme crecer allí, ya sabes, una de las razones por las que estaba feliz de no criar a mis hijos en ese ambiente, porque pensé, Oh, Dios mío, esto es tal, ya sabes, imágenes, todo tipo de cosas. Pero ellos tuvieron sus propios desafíos en Cleveland, Ohio, cuando los criaron, ¿verdad? No puedes escapar de Internet, no puedes escapar de las redes sociales. Y no creo que podamos escapar de las cosas en las que entramos, nacen en lo que puedan ser factores sociales o factores genéticos que nos llevan a ser alguien que tiene problemas de salud mental y adicción. Um, estoy bastante convencido de que yo era, ya sabes, esa parte de eso con la que nací, pero ya sabes, trabajo mucho sobre el trauma infantil y el trauma familiar de origen. Y en esta fase de mi recuperación, estoy empezando a mirar muy de cerca los porqués y a ser capaz de sentir curiosidad por mis sentimientos, mis pensamientos, mis palabras, mis acciones y cuál fue la génesis de eso, y cómo. Puedo rastrear eso hasta las cosas que sucedieron en mi infancia y en mi juventud. Entonces, estar en una ciudad como esta, no es más fácil, pero en algunos dirían, tal vez no sea más difícil que los jóvenes de todo el país. Sé que siento que es más difícil de lo que era cuando me criaron. Y siento que si hubiera entrado en una ciudad como esta que tiene tantas cosas disponibles para ellos, sin duda habría sido un desafío adicional. Las herramientas que utilizo para ir a esa parte de tu pregunta es, um, lo intento, está bien, así que es todo lo que dicen, el yoga y la meditación, lo llaman práctica de yoga o práctica de meditación, ¿verdad? Así que algunos días me va mejor en mi práctica que otros. Pero si puedo encontrar ese tiempo en la mañana para hacer algo de yoga y estiramientos y para pasar algún tiempo meditando y respirando bien. Es muy, muy útil para mí, tengo una lista de gratitud diaria que hago con un querido amigo mío en Nueva Orleans. Y eso es algo muy, muy útil. Sabes, había un viejo él cuando era pequeño llamado Cuenta tus bendiciones, ¿verdad? Es Cuente sus bendiciones, nómbrelas una por una, Cuente sus muchas bendiciones, vea lo que Dios ha hecho. ¿Correcto? Así que eso es solo algo que escuché mientras crecía, cierto, llegué a descubrirlo en la Nueva Era, en la era progresiva, en la era de más yoga y meditación y más, más, ya sabes, formas seculares en las que tal vez buscaríamos. en oración y meditación y cosas así. Ese viejo himno suena cierto para mí ahora porque una lista de gratitud diaria es solo eso, como si. Empiece a contar realmente las cosas que están sucediendo y que son positivas para usted, y las cosas por las que está agradecido que se reducen a lo más básico. Estoy tan agradecido hoy de haber despertado con vida. Estoy tan agradecido de haberme despertado sobrio, estoy tan agradecido de haberme despertado con personas que me aman y que puedo amar de forma segura. Estoy muy agradecido de saber ahora más sobre los límites y estar más en sintonía con mi niño interior y mi yo interior, y poder aprovechar lo que soy. Soy muy abierto y espiritual en este nuevo viaje sobre recibir y tratar. practicar más ecuanimidad, pensar realmente en los demás y tener más empatía, y comprender y tratar de regular mejor cuando la gente viene hacia mí o hacia otros con enojo, o lo que sea, poder mirar eso e irse, esa es su Yo de 12 años que se lastimó en ese momento, ese es su yo de 18 años que fue abusado, o, ya sabes, vio un accidente de tren o, ya sabes, fue acosado o no recibió la atención que querían. Entonces, la capacidad para mí ahora a través de la terapia, mis sesiones de terapia semanales con mi terapeuta, es muy, muy útil para hacer lo que estoy haciendo ahora con Song Summit, es una forma útil de servicio para mí, para poder retribuir en y por lo tanto incluso recibir dos veces y lo que yo he dado, correcto, entonces hay una parte egoísta de la recuperación. Y digo egoísta de una manera más benévola, dicen, ya sabes, no puedes, si no lo regalas, esto me ayuda al regalarlo para mantener mi sobriedad. Así que la oración es muy importante para mí, la meditación, el yoga, el estiramiento, la respiración, mis listas diarias de gratitud y conectarme con otras personas en recuperación de manera regular son solo algunas de las cosas que me mantienen sólido. Y las lecturas que hago, muy, muy importantes para mí, podría vivir hasta los 150 y aun así darme cuenta de que todavía estoy aprendiendo más y tratando de crecer. Y que aún hay más que no sé que sí sé.



Jessica Crate
Cien por ciento, bueno, has tocado muchas cosas geniales. Y me encanta que se dé cuenta del aspecto geográfico de vivir en una ciudad turística porque comienza y comienza en las seis pulgadas entre las orejas. Y si podemos empezar por ahí. Y sabes, como muchas citas, y sabes, los autores dicen que, si puedes corregir tu mente, el resto del mundo encajará en su lugar. Me encanta que presentaste esos elementos de acción sobre el yoga, la meditación, la práctica de la gratitud, ya sabes, mi esposo y yo estábamos hablando de eso esta mañana, y las pequeñas canciones que cuentan tus bendiciones, cosas que estoy inculcando en nuestros recién nacido. Así que me encantan estos consejos en la herramienta. Entonces, con suerte, si está sintonizando, está tomando notas, porque Ben está lanzando algunas pepitas increíbles en este momento. Y amo estos recursos. Sabes, una de mis preguntas favoritas es que si pudieras agitar tu varita mágica, ¿qué te gustaría ver o crear en nuestra comunidad?

 

Ben Anderson
Um, oh, no, son una gran pregunta sobre una difícil, me encantaría ver más conexión con nuestra comunidad Latinx y los desafíos de salud mental que tienen. Y, en particular, ya sabes, en una ciudad donde se confía mucho en ellos para nuestros servicios, siento que a veces se los trata como un miembro invisible de nuestra sociedad. Así que me encantaría ver más recursos y más conversación y más inclusión en nuestra comunidad Latinx, me encantaría ver más. Y entonces, ya saben, me dirijo a las personas de color en general, que hacemos más para permitirles que se conviertan en lo mejor de sí mismas, y que abordemos esta cosa que ha estado escondida bajo la alfombra durante mucho tiempo. , Siento que son miembros productivos, cariñosos, cariñosos, orientados a la familia y orientados a nuestra comunidad, en quienes confiamos para hacer las cosas que otros tal vez no hagan. Y creo que eso debe abordarse, me encantaría ver esa ola que uno abordó mejor. Y lo haría si pudiera agitar mi varita dos veces, diría que lo mismo es cierto para nuestra comunidad LGBTQ plus. Y los desafíos de salud mental en ambas partes de nuestra comunidad serían algo que me encantaría ver que se está abordando, y se está fomentando y nutriendo. Y esos son muy, muy importantes para mí. Y en esto para ver que me encantaría. Si pudiera agitar mi varita la tercera vez, sería que nos dirigimos a jóvenes de todos los colores, de todos los géneros y de todas las preferencias sexuales, que todos nuestros jóvenes sentirían más conexión entre sí y con ellos mismos y que estarían felices. capaces de obtener los recursos que necesitan y que podrían vivir vidas más saludables en lo que respecta a la salud mental y sus comparaciones con los demás. Y más empatía el uno por el otro, um, solo yo, me duele saber que hay personas que se van a la cama todas las noches, llorando lágrimas y preguntándose, ya sabes, y pensando, ya sabes, son, ellos ‘ no son buenos y ya no deberían estar aquí. Me duele profundamente pensar en eso. Y si son una persona de color o alguien de LGBTQ plus, o son jóvenes, sienten que nadie los está escuchando, nadie los escucha y nadie los ama, me rompe el corazón. Entonces, si tuviera una varita mágica grande y vieja, la agitaría y simplemente diría que eres amado, que no estás solo. Y necesitamos hacer más para ayudarlo, ¿qué podemos hacer? Eso sería.

 

Jessica Crate
Sabes, puedo sentir tu corazón aquí. Entonces, aquellos de ustedes que sintonizan, saben, estoy seguro de que pueden sentir el corazón de Ben y el nuestro, mientras nos hacemos eco de eso, y simplemente sepan que están sintonizando aquí, son amados, apreciados y tienen un propósito y una pasión en la vida. Ben, eres un alma increíble y un ser humano maravilloso, me estás poniendo emocional. Última pregunta, ya sabes, ¿cómo te ayuda CTC en tu trabajo?



Ben Anderson
Al hacer lo que está haciendo en este momento, y al ayudarme a comprender mejor cómo debo enviar mensajes, quiero aprender más, necesito aprender más, quiero ser parte de estas conversaciones sobre las mejores prácticas y pensar mejor. sobre cómo podemos abordar estas cosas que mencioné hace un minuto. Y hacer que las personas sepan que son especiales y que son amadas. Y así, todo lo que puedo hacer desde la Cumbre de la Canción, trabajar con CTC, ser un megáfono, ser un socio, ayudar a crear conciencia y recaudar fondos, pero también ser educado para no vivir en una cámara de eco. Y luego no soy sordo, con los problemas reales que están ahí fuera. Porque creo que si dejamos entrar, creamos la plataforma para que nuestros jóvenes nos digan lo que necesitan, en lugar de que nosotros sigamos diciéndoles a los jóvenes lo que necesitan. Y no estoy sugiriendo que CTC no haga esto, creo que es como si más personas necesitaran hacer lo que tú estás haciendo. Pero tenemos que escucharlos y dejar que nos ayuden a establecer agendas, dejar que nos ayuden a establecer cuál debería ser nuestro objetivo, en lugar de y lo mismo ocurre con las personas de color y la comunidad LGBTQ plus. Me miro, soy un hombre blanco heterosexual, ¿no? No entiendo. No sé con qué viven. Pero quiero entenderlo mejor. Y tener, ya sabes, más atención en torno a eso. Y eso es lo que CGC podría hacer conmigo es tener una asociación continua. Y para dejarme saber, dame información para leer, dime cómo podría salir y ayudar de alguna manera. Y estar mejor informado sobre cuáles son los problemas reales y las mejores formas de abordarlos. Creo que para cada problema hay muchas, muchas soluciones. Pero si no contamos con las herramientas adecuadas en el juego de herramientas o si no contamos con el juego de herramientas incorrecto, nuestras soluciones a menudo fallan. Y es por eso que la forma en que me describí a mí mismo es que necesito saber cuál es el conjunto de herramientas que contienen las mejores herramientas. De modo que, viniendo de mi propia experiencia, puedo eliminar eso de la ecuación y ponerme mejor en los mocasines de otras personas y comprender cuáles son sus verdaderas necesidades y cómo puedo ayudar en eso. Y no siempre se trata solo de escribir un cheque. Es arremangarse y tratar de marcar la diferencia. Y así es como podrías ayudarme a mí y a mi organización.

 

Jessica Crate
Cien por ciento bueno, estamos emocionados de asociarnos con ustedes y colaborar juntos porque se necesita un pueblo y estamos ansiosos por la cumbre de la canción que se celebrará el próximo mes. Y muy agradecido por su apuesta de trabajo y ha sido un honor y un privilegio estar aquí hoy con ustedes. Y antes de dejarte ir, les pregunté a todos amables y ya sabes, si tienes una cita, un legado, un mantra ¿Qué te gustaría dejar a nuestros espectadores? Um, no estás solo. Estamos en todas partes. Amo ese poderoso. Eres un alma tan hermosa y estoy muy agradecida de tenerla no solo en Park City en nuestra comunidad, sino también como un recurso. Entonces, aquellos de ustedes que sintonizan, muchas gracias por acompañarnos hoy en nuestros lunes de salud mental, un video con podcast de CTC Summit County. Así que en nombre de nuestra directora ejecutiva, Mary Krista Smith y de mí, Jessica Craig Overson. Muchas gracias por sintonizarnos. Puede encontrar un enlace a todos nuestros podcasts en nuestro blog en CTC summit county.org. Y esperamos verte todos los lunes. Así que conéctese y actúe. No seas un extraño. Estamos todos juntos en esto. Y como dijo Ben, no estás solo. Así que conviértalo en un gran día. Y pronto hablaremos con todos ustedes. Adiós por ahora.

 

Upcoming Events