Mental Health Mondays with Hunter Klingensmith; Swaner EcoCenter

Oct 26, 2021 | Mental Health Mondays

Swaner Ecocenter provides opportunities for youth and families to connect with Nature and our beautiful environment.  Their mission is to preserve the land and the human connection to the natural landscape, educate the local community about the value of nature, and nurture both the ecosystem and the people connected to it.  

 

Hunter Klingensmith (She/Her/Hers) | Visitor Experience and Exhibit Manager

Swaner Preserve and EcoCenter, Utah State University

1258 Center Drive | Park City, UT | 84098 | 435-797-8943

hunter.klingensmith@usu.edu |swanerecocenter.org

 

From this discussion:
Links to Swaner pages:
https://www.swanerecocenter.org/

https://www.facebook.com/SwanerEcoCenter

https://www.instagram.com/swanerpreserve/

https://twitter.com/SwanerPreserve

https://www.pinterest.com/swanerecocenter/_created/

 

Jessica Crate  

Alright hello everyone and welcome to Mental Health Mondays at Communities That Care video podcast discussing mental health. I am Jessica Crate Oveson, the visionary spokeswoman for CTC Communities That Care Summit County. And at CTC, our vision is really a world of connection, vitality and wellbeing where kids and families thrive. And our mission is to collaboratively improve the lives of youth and families by fostering a culture of youth through prevention. And at CTC, we have a saying that says, connection is truly prevention. And in the spirit of connection, we are just delighted to have Miss Hunter from Swaner. Hunter is the visitor experience and exhibit manager. She’s lived in Park City for nine years. You’re originally from Park City. We’re sorry, originally from Pennsylvania, not many people from Park City, we’re seeing like the melting pot right under. Yeah. But you’ve been with the Swaner for seven years. So thank you so much for joining us today. We’re excited to dive in with you. So let’s start off tell us a little bit more about yourself, your organization. Really the initiative behind the Swaner and and why you love our community. 

Hunter Klingensmith  

Yeah, sure thing. So I moved to Park City as most people do to ski and then learned that the summers were amazing. And I knew that I had gone to school for architecture and decided that that was not the route I wanted to go. So I went to the University of Utah. I started as a ski instructor at Deer Valley Resort. And then I ended up going to the University of Utah for environmental science. And I learned about the SWANER preserve about a year into moving here. And I came and volunteered a few times and then a conservation internship started up and opened up. And so I applied and got it and then I just couldn’t leave I loved it here so much. We have an awesome team of people, the mission is amazing. And having the opportunity to get outside all the time is I mean, perfect. So since then, I’ve kind of rolled into my role of visitor experience and exhibit manager here. And so I manage all of our public facing programming that happens at the Eco center, outside of youth education, and then also our traveling exhibit program, which has been really fun to get involved in. And so the little bit of history to the SWANER Preserve is that the SWANER preserve started in 1993. In 1992, the father of the SWANER family who had ranched on about 190 acres of what is now the Preserve, passed away and the family decided that they wanted to create a memorial space for him. And part of that was going to be just making a rose garden and you know, somewhere where, where there was a little bit of contemplative space somewhere where people people could go to relax. And they actually learned that there was really rich, healthy wetland soil underneath where they wanted to build that rose garden. And from there, they caught the conservation bug. And it took off and they really decided to turn it into a preserve, which also gave them that same opportunity to give people a space to be outside and to have some peace and you know, take a moment relieve some stress, all those things that they wanted, just changed a little bit. But still those same results are there. And so from there, there was some big restoration that took place with a lot of the ranching that was on the preserve. There was there were over 60 irrigation ditches or drainage ditches that were dug. A lot of the ponds had been altered or filled. And then the stream channels, a lot of them had been straightened just to make it ideal for that that ranching habitat. So instead, they started doing restoration, removing invasive species planting native species, rerouting those stream channels, filling those ditches. And you know that’s kind of getting us to where we are today. We’re still doing lots of restoration restoration work always. But it is really fun to just see even in the the seven years that I’ve been working here how much has changed and how big some of those willow trees are getting and animals that have moved in. And so you know, it’s a it’s a really fun space. And so now we have a 1200 acre preserve, were owned by Utah State University, we donated ourselves to them in 2010. And we function as an along with this beautiful Preserve. We also have our Nature Center, which I’m in right now that has we do traveling exhibits, we host education programming here. We have all kinds of fun stuff for people to do and you can just stop in and visit us. So it’s it’s a great opportunity to get people engaged in nature and to nurture our community’s connection to nature. That’s, you know, really one of our big goals.

Jessica Crate  

Well, I love that you highlighted not only the history, but really what that means and I used to live right on the Swaner and seeing those cranes come in and build nests and all the wildlife that we have in Park City. It’s just an image amazing opportunity to really delve into the culture of Park City and and also the history, we’re very rich in diversity and history here in Park City. So, you know, you do a lot of things in throughout the community for kids and adults of all ages and walks of life. So let’s talk a little bit more about how this water really does foster that mental health and wholeness because we know that mental health is a balance between mind body and spirit. And so you guys have really done an incredible job at this monitor, and you yourself just being part of this whole community. Talk to us a little bit more about how you foster that connectedness that you’re describing.

Hunter Klingensmith  

Yeah, so I think that, you know, we’re we’re learning every year that being spending time in nature has huge impacts on our mental health, right? There’s a stale study from Yale, just from 2020, that shows that just 120 minutes, two hours in nature per week, can really boost your your Endorphins make you have a lot happier, reduce your stress level. So all those things, right. So just having the preserve here as an opportunity for people to really get outside, spend a little time in nature. And it doesn’t have to be like, I think a lot of times we have this feeling that being out in nature means we need to be away from any other people and it needs to be totally secluded, you can’t see a human interaction. But really, it means, you know, just having a little bit of time with natural elements around you can make a huge difference. And so for us, those youth programs that where we get kids, you know, our summer camp programs, if you come for any of the different themes, those kids are spending the majority of the time outside, they’re going to get hands on experience, they get to get muddy, and dirty, and catch frogs and do all that fun stuff. And it’s a really unique experience. Even if you do that in your day to day life, having the opportunity to get outside and do it in a way where maybe, you know, I think a big part of that is there are people who already go outside and are active and especially in our community here, you know, we have a very active community. But having those hands on experiences where you’re not just like out doing an activity, but you get to actually, you know, get in the water. And part of that, too, is our so we do volunteer programs. And so volunteers are a huge part of preserving the the landscape here. And for us being able to do the restoration work that we need to do and to keep the habitat in the right shape for the all of the wildlife that depends on it. And that’s a great way to build community. I feel like I’ve met so many people in our community, just by getting out there and being with the volunteers who we so appreciate that come and spend time and it’s it’s you know, you get to get in the stream. And you can help build Beaver Dam analogs and get your, you know, get in put on some waiters get in the water. And it’s just, it’s just such a fun opportunity to get outside. And so I think I may have feared from your original question at some point. But.

Jessica Crate  

No. you were spot on because it’s all about diving in and working together. And you talk a lot about community connectedness. And you know, as we enter the winter months, a lot of people like to be more secluded. So let’s talk about some things that the Swaner is doing to really foster mental health, wholeness, and really what kind of things you guys have going on coming up that creates more community and that people can get involved in? 

Hunter Klingensmith  

Yeah, so there’s a couple of really cool things happening right now. I know what the snow outside, I’m looking at it out my window, it is hard to motivate to get outside, especially when you’re like not really skiing yet or you know, doing those snow sport activities that we all love. But right now in our space, we have an exhibit called survival of the slowest. And I think that the connection of survival of the slowest to what we’re talking about in connecting with your community and taking time for your mental health and making sure that you know, you have a minute to slow down is really important. So I think there’s a lot that can be learned from the animals in this exhibit. So this is a live animal exhibit. And it’s the main animal that everyone is oh, so excited about is the slot but there are so many other fun things here too. But we can take a lot of notes from these guys, right like being able to just immerse yourself in this exhibit, you can come and you can meet the baby’s last sash or you can watch Lulu move around her and enclosure who’s our older sloths. But just seeing them you know, take time be really intentional move slowly sleep in like the funniest position laying on her back with their paws crossed over her or her you know, her feet crossed over her chest. Just seeing that like taking a moment to just take that in and be slow and try to you know, learn a little bit about these animals who are slow and how it helps them to thrive and how slowing down yourself can really help you just like

Jessica Crate  

I love this. Okay, what hours Can we come in? 

Hunter Klingensmith  

Yeah, so 10am to 4pm. Wednesday through Sunday is the open time and then we’re also doing so during that time. There are and one of the best parts about this exhibit. is that there are animal keepers, the people who take care of these animals are actually out with you in the exhibit and they’ll get animals out, you get to meet them. sashes are smaller slots. So she usually comes out a couple times during the day. And unfortunately, just because there’s so many people coming in, not everyone has an opportunity to tattoo but we are doing some private encounters to where you can get a little bit more close up to some of the some of the animals and be the only people in the exhibit. But 10am to 4pm, Wednesday through Sunday. And big push this Wednesday is our first free day of the exhibit. So there’ll be three free days, we want to make sure that this exhibit is accessible to the entirety of our community, no matter your financial abilities, or your comfort level is coming in, we want you to have an opportunity to come in so we have this first free day, it’s 10am to 6pm on Wednesday, so tomorrow. 

Jessica Crate  

Well, can’t wait guys, I’m going to have to bring my little one, he did his first I have a three month old and he did first trip to the zoo, so we’re gonna have to take him, and it’ll be his first trip to the Swaner.

Hunter Klingensmith  

Oh, I love it.

Jessica Crate  

Tomorrow. 

Hunter Klingensmith  

Yes. Definitley come over.

Jessica Crate  

This is exciting. Well, there’s so many cool things going on. And it’s so great to not only stop and breathe, and we’ve talked about this on a lot of our video podcasts is to really slow down, relax, now breathe your nature, observe what’s going on. And take time not only to connect with nature, but with others too. So, you know, we live in a resort town swamp has been here for a long time. You’ve been here for, you know, seven years with the Swaner, almost a decade with Park City. So let’s talk about some specific mental health issues that you know, living in a resort town that you’re seeing, and maybe through your work with this water that things that you’ve noticed, and what are some tips and resources that you can give our viewers or recommend to people tuning in today? 

Hunter Klingensmith  

Yeah, sure thing. So I think for me personally, one of the biggest mental health challenges that there is, is in a resort town, we have these really busy times, right? It’s so busy, like getting this exhibit installed and getting everything ready to go and getting ready for winter when we have all these visitors is a lot of pressure for for a lot of especially our seasonal workers, right? It’s It’s stressful to have to switch jobs or get ready for your next move or, you know, be thinking about maybe you have a little bit of time off. But you’re you’re getting into this strange season. And so we have these really stressful times of years, especially in a resort town, because we’re we’re depending on that tourism. And so I think one thing that has been great for me working at Swaner, specifically is that we have this fun staff here where everyone is really excited about we do what we do, they love getting outside. And so one of the things that they’ll you know, Katherine, who’s our education director will like come running into my office. And even if I feel like I have 1000 things to do, and I’m stressed out, I’ve been working too much. She comes in and she’s like, there’s a deer on the back deck, you have to come out and see it or the Beavers are out in the pond, like take a minute, let’s go do this. And just having those like, few minutes I go, I go and meet her for three minutes. And we look at the deer, we check out the beavers that are swimming around in the pond. And it’s just this, like, I come back to my desk. And I think, okay, like I’ve got it, it’s all fine, it’s not that stressful. It’s not the end of the world, like everything is going to be okay, I don’t need to be as stressed as I am. And so I think taking that, you know, taking a minute to step back, go for the walk, don’t just sit and eat your lunch at your desk or you know, try to stress eat as much as you can and then run back to you know, take a couple of minutes to go for a walk outside, look out the window at the trees that are out there take two seconds to like just take in the the snow that has fallen. And I think that that’s that’s one of the things that helps me the most. And I see it when people come to visit the Eco center too is like, you know, we have a few people maybe who work at that country around the corner or they’ll stop in and on their lunch break. And they just take a few minutes on the deck. And you can see just from like the group that comes in how they’re talking about work. And then they come back in and they’re like, We had no idea there was a beaver pond outlet there. Tell us more about that. You know, and I think that just taking a minute to like, give yourself a second. Yeah, about something else can really bring that stress level down of like just how busy things can be.

Jessica Crate  

Well, we can tell that you’re taking this no, because you’re just invigorating yourself in that you’re energized and you’re relaxed, but you’re calm and it’s just such an amazing persona coming through even though we’re on a zoom on a podcast. It’s just so neat to see what it can do for your mental health and wholeness as you live, work and breathe air, people coming in. And as a new mom, I know how important it is to pause and take a breath. You know, find time for your health to disconnect to reconnect. So thanks so much for sharing. Now. This is one of my favorite questions and Hunter if you could wave your magic wand. What would you like to see or create in our community now and moving forward?

Hunter Klingensmith  

Oh, Oh, man. Okay, so there’s two things, I know that housing can be a really big issue for seasonal workers here in Park City. And it has been challenging for me as well. And so I would say probably my top priority would be figuring out a way to have more, and I know that we’re working on this, but if I could just like wave a magic wand and have it be all done, I would have a better balance of, you know, availability for our seasonal workers and our workers who are really making the resort community go round. In addition to housing for our visitors, and the people who are coming, you know, finding a happy balance there. And then including a lot of open space and outdoor space in that because I think that’s, as we’ve been talking about, really important to be able to get outside. So that would probably be my my first one. And then the other one would be that we would have a mandatory one hour middle of the day break where nobody has to be at work, and everybody gets to go outside, or Takens. And something else that makes them happy. So those would be my two things.

Jessica Crate  

I love it. And you know, a little bit a while ago, we had like Instagram, Facebook, all the social media platforms like shut down for a day. I can’t tell you how wonderful it was to breathe. And I think if everyone just can maybe shut this little gas, disconnect, and head over to the swatter, and let’s work with hunter to help build this dream of creating larger community ecosystems and a place of serenity that really when you get over there, you will see how, how just clears you mind body spirit, and I love what you’ve discussed today. Hunter, thank you for the action tips, the history of this water. And finally, before we end this, I’d like to, you know, get a feel from you have, you know, we say it takes a village, you know, how has been part of the chamber Communities That Care Summit County really helped helped you in your work?

Hunter Klingensmith  

Yeah, so I I think that, you know, I started in this position, knowing not very much about exhibits, or the world of like, our nonprofit community. And I think having being part of the chamber and having these other businesses or mentors or, you know, people to chat with and better understand how everything works in our community is just huge, not only for me, but for our organization as a whole, you know, to have someone to reach out to me, like, Hey, we’re struggling with this, or we’re not reaching this part of our community that we really want to be reaching, and to have that group of people who are also part of the chamber, and really helps because you you can reach out and get help and and people can come to us and it just gives you this like starting point without having to just cold call people and say, hey, you’ve never heard of us before. But could you help us? 

Jessica Crate  

Yeah, exactly. 

Hunter Klingensmith  

I really appreciate having that connection.

Jessica Crate  

Amazing. And you know, what so great is, you know, you’re you’re leaving a legacy and you’re helping the Swaner live and create a legacy, which is so cool. Just how you’re helping, you know, I’m sure the little kids and the people that have come through since 1993, I believe, in 1993 have stories of visiting this monster, and and all the things you’re doing there. So last but not least Hunter. And if you could leave a quote a mantra, or an action item tool for our viewers, listeners and those subscribing to our blog. What would you like to leave with our listeners today?

Hunter Klingensmith  

Well, thank you so much for having me. And I would say just go outside, don’t bring your phone or bring your phone, listen to a podcast, whatever. Go outside, breathe in the good air. And just take a minute and then go back to what you’re doing and I’ll feel better.

Jessica Crate  

And even if it’s five minutes in a snowy day, I’m telling we did this this morning and it is so clearing so cleansing and it’s gorgeous outside. So thank you so much Hunter on behalf of our executive director, Mary Christa Smith and myself, and ztc we just thank you so much for tuning in. And for subscribing. You can find a link to all of our videos and podcasts at CTC summit county.org. So again, thank you for your time today. Please, if you find value in this, like us, tweet us share us. Share this recommend us to others and we look forward to seeing you each and every Monday on our mental health Monday. So again, thanks for tuning in Hunter. We’ll see you soon at the Swaner. And thanks everyone for listening in today. Bye for now.

Hunter Klingensmith  

Thank you so much.

“Utilizamos un servicio automatizado para esta traducción. Somos conscientes de que puede haber errores y agradecemos su comprensión”.

Jessica Crate  
Muy bien, hola a todos y bienvenidos al video podcast de los lunes de salud mental en Communities That Care que discute la salud mental. Soy Jessica Crate Oveson, la vocera visionaria de CTC Communities That Care Summit County. Y en CTC, nuestra visión es realmente un mundo de conexión, vitalidad y bienestar donde los niños y las familias prosperen. Y nuestra misión es mejorar de manera colaborativa las vidas de los jóvenes y las familias fomentando una cultura de la juventud a través de la prevención. Y en CTC, tenemos un dicho que dice que la conexión es verdaderamente prevención. Y en el espíritu de conexión, estamos encantados de tener a Miss Hunter de Swaner. Hunter es el encargado de la experiencia del visitante y de la exposición. Ha vivido en Park City durante nueve años. Eres originario de Park City. Lo sentimos, originalmente de Pensilvania, no mucha gente de Park City, estamos viendo como un crisol justo debajo. Sí. Pero llevas siete años con el Swaner. Así que muchas gracias por acompañarnos hoy. Estamos emocionados de sumergirnos contigo. Comencemos, cuéntenos un poco más sobre usted, su organización. Realmente la iniciativa detrás de Swaner y por qué amas a nuestra comunidad.

Hunter Klingensmith  
Sí, claro. Así que me mudé a Park City como la mayoría de la gente para esquiar y luego aprendí que los veranos eran increíbles. Y supe que había ido a la escuela de arquitectura y decidí que esa no era la ruta que quería seguir. Entonces fui a la Universidad de Utah. Comencé como instructor de esquí en Deer Valley Resort. Y luego terminé yendo a la Universidad de Utah para estudiar ciencias ambientales. Y supe sobre la reserva SWANER aproximadamente un año después de mudarme aquí. Y vine y me ofrecí como voluntario algunas veces y luego comenzó una pasantía de conservación y se abrió. Entonces apliqué y lo obtuve y luego no pude irme. Me encantó tanto aquí. Tenemos un equipo de personas increíble, la misión es increíble. Y tener la oportunidad de salir a la calle todo el tiempo es perfecto. Entonces, desde entonces, he asumido mi rol de gerente de exhibición y experiencia de visitante aquí. Y entonces administro toda nuestra programación de cara al público que ocurre en el centro ecológico, fuera de la educación juvenil, y luego también nuestro programa de exhibición itinerante, en el que ha sido muy divertido participar. Y así, un poco de historia para SWANER La reserva es que la reserva SWANER comenzó en 1993. En 1992, el padre de la familia SWANER, que se había ganado unos 190 acres de lo que ahora es la reserva, falleció y la familia decidió que querían crear un espacio conmemorativo para él. Y parte de eso iba a ser simplemente hacer un jardín de rosas y ya sabes, en algún lugar donde, donde hubiera un poco de espacio contemplativo en algún lugar donde la gente pudiera ir a relajarse. Y de hecho se enteraron de que había un humedal muy rico y saludable debajo del lugar donde querían construir ese jardín de rosas.Y a partir de ahí, se contagiaron del virus de la conservación. Y despegó y realmente decidieron convertirlo en una reserva, lo que también les dio esa misma oportunidad de darle a la gente un espacio para estar afuera y tener algo de paz y ya sabes, tómate un momento para aliviar un poco el estrés, todas esas cosas que querían, solo cambiaron un poco. Pero aún así esos mismos resultados están ahí. Y a partir de ahí, hubo una gran restauración que se llevó a cabo con gran parte de la ganadería que estaba en la reserva. Hubo más de 60 acequias de riego o de drenaje que fueron cavadas. Muchos de los estanques habían sido alterados o llenados. Y luego los canales de los arroyos, muchos de ellos se habían enderezado solo para que fueran ideales para ese hábitat de rancho. Entonces, en cambio, comenzaron a hacer restauración, eliminando especies invasoras, plantando especies nativas, desviando esos canales de arroyos, llenando esas zanjas. Y sabes que eso nos lleva a donde estamos hoy. Siempre estamos haciendo mucho trabajo de restauración. Pero es realmente divertido ver, incluso en los siete años que he estado trabajando aquí, cuánto ha cambiado y cuán grandes se están volviendo algunos de esos sauces y animales que se han mudado. un espacio realmente divertido. Y ahora tenemos una reserva de 1200 acres, era propiedad de la Universidad del Estado de Utah, nos donamos a ellos en 2010. Y funcionamos junto con esta hermosa Reserva. También tenemos nuestro Centro de la Naturaleza, en el que estoy ahora mismo, tenemos exhibiciones itinerantes, organizamos programas educativos aquí. Tenemos todo tipo de cosas divertidas para que la gente haga y puede pasar y visitarnos. Por lo tanto, es una gran oportunidad para involucrar a las personas con la naturaleza y fomentar la conexión de nuestra comunidad con la naturaleza. Ese es, ya sabes, uno de nuestros grandes objetivos.

Jessica Crate  
Bueno, me encanta que hayas destacado no solo la historia, sino también lo que eso significa. Yo solía vivir en Swaner y ver cómo esas grullas entraban y construían nidos y toda la vida silvestre que tenemos en Park City. Es solo una imagen increíble oportunidad para profundizar realmente en la cultura de Park City y también en la historia, somos muy ricos en diversidad e historia aquí en Park City. Entonces, ya sabes, haces muchas cosas en toda la comunidad para niños y adultos de todas las edades y estilos de vida. Así que hablemos un poco más sobre cómo esta agua realmente fomenta la salud mental y la integridad porque sabemos que la salud mental es un equilibrio entre la mente, el cuerpo y el espíritu. Y ustedes realmente han hecho un trabajo increíble en este monitor, y ustedes mismos son parte de toda esta comunidad. Háblenos un poco más sobre cómo fomenta esa conexión que está describiendo.

Hunter Klingensmith  
Sí, entonces creo que, ya sabes, estamos aprendiendo cada año que pasar tiempo en la naturaleza tiene un gran impacto en nuestra salud mental, ¿verdad? Hay un estudio obsoleto de Yale, solo de 2020, que muestra que solo 120 minutos, dos horas en la naturaleza por semana, realmente pueden aumentar sus endorfinas, lo que lo hace mucho más feliz, reduce su nivel de estrés. Entonces todas esas cosas, cierto. Así que tener la reserva aquí es una oportunidad para que la gente realmente salga y pase un poco de tiempo en la naturaleza. Y no tiene por qué ser como, creo que muchas veces tenemos la sensación de que estar en la naturaleza significa que debemos estar lejos de otras personas y debe estar totalmente aislado, no se puede ver a un humano. Interacción. Pero realmente, significa, ya sabes, tener un poco de tiempo con los elementos naturales que te rodean puede marcar una gran diferencia. Y entonces, para nosotros, esos programas para jóvenes en los que tenemos niños, ya sabes, nuestros programas de campamento de verano, si vienes por cualquiera de los diferentes temas, esos niños pasan la mayor parte del tiempo al aire libre, se van a poner manos a la obra. por experiencia, se embarran y ensucian, cazan ranas y hacen todas esas cosas divertidas. Y es una experiencia realmente única. Incluso si haces eso en tu vida cotidiana, tener la oportunidad de salir y hacerlo de una manera en la que tal vez, ya sabes, creo que una gran parte de eso es que hay personas que ya salen y están activas y especialmente en nuestra comunidad aquí, ya sabes, tenemos una comunidad muy activa. Pero tener esas experiencias prácticas en las que no solo eres como hacer una actividad, sino que puedes, ya sabes, meterte en el agua. Y parte de eso también es nuestro, así que hacemos programas de voluntariado. Por eso, los voluntarios son una gran parte de la preservación del paisaje aquí. Y para que podamos hacer el trabajo de restauración que necesitamos hacer y mantener el hábitat en la forma correcta para toda la vida silvestre que depende de él. Y esa es una excelente manera de construir una comunidad. Siento que he conocido a tanta gente en nuestra comunidad, simplemente saliendo y estando con los voluntarios a quienes apreciamos tanto que vienen y pasan tiempo y es que tú sabes, puedes entrar en la corriente. Y puedes ayudar a construir análogos de Beaver Dam y conseguir que tus, ya sabes, te pongan algunos camareros en el agua. Y es simplemente una oportunidad tan divertida para salir. Y por eso creo que en algún momento podría haber temido por su pregunta original. Pero.

Jessica Crate  
No. acertó porque se trata de sumergirse y trabajar juntos. Y hablas mucho sobre la conexión comunitaria. Y ya sabes, cuando entramos en los meses de invierno, a mucha gente le gusta estar más aislada. Entonces, hablemos de algunas cosas que Swaner está haciendo para fomentar realmente la salud mental, la integridad y, realmente, ¿qué tipo de cosas están sucediendo que crean más comunidad y en las que la gente puede involucrarse?

Hunter Klingensmith  
Sí, están sucediendo un par de cosas realmente interesantes en este momento. Sé lo que es la nieve afuera, la estoy mirando por la ventana, es difícil motivarse para salir, sobre todo cuando no estás realmente esquiando todavía o ya sabes, haciendo esos deportes de nieve que a todos nos encantan. Pero ahora mismo en nuestro espacio, tenemos una exhibición llamada supervivencia de los más lentos. Y creo que la conexión de la supervivencia de los más lentos con lo que estamos hablando al conectarse con su comunidad y tomarse el tiempo para su salud mental y asegurarse de que sabe que tiene un minuto para reducir la velocidad es realmente importante. Así que creo que se puede aprender mucho de los animales de esta exhibición. Así que esta es una exhibición de animales vivos. Y es el animal principal por el que todos están, oh, tan emocionado es la tragamonedas, pero también hay muchas otras cosas divertidas aquí. Pero podemos tomar muchas notas de estos chicos, justo como poder sumergirse en esta exhibición, puedes venir y puedes conocer la última faja del bebé o puedes ver a Lulu moverse alrededor de ella y el recinto, que son nuestros perezosos mayores. Pero con solo verlos, ya sabes, tómate un tiempo, sé realmente intencional, muévete lentamente, duerme en la posición más divertida acostada de espaldas con las patas cruzadas sobre ella o ella, ya sabes, con los pies cruzados sobre el pecho. Solo ver eso es como tomarse un momento para asimilar eso y ser lento y tratar de saber, aprender un poco sobre estos animales que son lentos y cómo les ayuda a prosperar y cómo reducir la velocidad puede ayudarlo realmente.

Jessica Crate  
Me encanta esto. Está bien, ¿a qué horas podemos entrar?

Hunter Klingensmith  
Sí, de 10 a. M. A 4 p. M. De miércoles a domingo es el tiempo abierto y también lo haremos durante ese tiempo. Hay una de las mejores partes de esta exhibición. es que hay cuidadores de animales, las personas que cuidan a estos animales en realidad están contigo en la exhibición y sacarán a los animales, puedes conocerlos. las fajas son ranuras más pequeñas. Por eso suele salir un par de veces durante el día. Y desafortunadamente, solo porque hay tanta gente entrando, no todos tienen la oportunidad de tatuarse, pero estamos haciendo algunos encuentros privados para que puedas acercarte un poco más a algunos de los animales y ser las únicas personas. en la exhibición. Pero de 10 a. M. A 4 p. M., De miércoles a domingo. Y gran impulso este miércoles es nuestro primer día libre de la exhibición. Así que habrá tres días libres, queremos asegurarnos de que esta exhibición sea accesible para toda nuestra comunidad, sin importar sus habilidades financieras o su nivel de comodidad, queremos que tenga la oportunidad de entrar. así que tenemos este primer día libre, es de 10 a. m. a 6 p. m. el miércoles, así que mañana.

Jessica Crate  
Bueno, no puedo esperar chicos, voy a tener que traer a mi pequeño, él hizo su primer hijo de tres meses y él hizo su primer viaje al zoológico, así que vamos a tener que llevarlo, y será su primer viaje al Swaner.

Hunter Klingensmith  
Oh, me encanta.

Jessica Crate  
Mañana. 

Hunter Klingensmith  
Si. Definitley ven.

Jessica Crate  
Esto es emocionante. Bueno, están sucediendo muchas cosas interesantes. Y es genial no solo detenerse y respirar, y hemos hablado de esto en muchos de nuestros podcasts de video, es realmente disminuir la velocidad, relajarse, ahora respirar su naturaleza, observar lo que está sucediendo. Y tómate tu tiempo no solo para conectarte con la naturaleza, sino también con los demás. Entonces, ya sabes, vivimos en un pantano de ciudad turística que ha estado aquí durante mucho tiempo. Has estado aquí, ya sabes, siete años con Swaner, casi una década con Park City. Así que hablemos sobre algunos problemas específicos de salud mental que conoces, viviendo en una ciudad turística que estás viendo, y tal vez a través de tu trabajo con esta agua, esas cosas que has notado, y cuáles son algunos consejos y recursos que puedes. dar a nuestros espectadores o recomendar a las personas que sintonizan hoy?

Hunter Klingensmith  
Sí, claro. Así que creo que para mí, personalmente, uno de los mayores desafíos de salud mental que hay, es en una ciudad turística, tenemos estos tiempos realmente ocupados, ¿verdad? Es tan ajetreado, como instalar esta exhibición y tener todo listo para comenzar y prepararse para el invierno cuando tenemos todos estos visitantes es mucha presión para muchos, especialmente nuestros trabajadores de temporada, ¿verdad? Es estresante tener que cambiar de trabajo o prepararse para su próximo movimiento o, ya sabe, estar pensando en que tal vez tenga un poco de tiempo libre. Pero estás entrando en esta extraña temporada. Y entonces tenemos estos tiempos de años realmente estresantes, especialmente en una ciudad turística, porque dependemos de ese turismo. Y creo que una cosa que ha sido genial para mí trabajando en Swaner, específicamente es que tenemos este personal divertido aquí donde todos están realmente emocionados de que hagamos lo que hacemos, les encanta salir. Y una de las cosas que sabrán, Katherine, que es nuestra directora de educación, querrá venir corriendo a mi oficina. E incluso si siento que tengo 1000 cosas que hacer y estoy estresado, he estado trabajando demasiado. Ella entra y dice, hay un ciervo en la cubierta trasera, tienes que salir y verlo o los castores están en el estanque, como tómate un minuto, vamos a hacer esto. Y solo teniendo esos como, en unos minutos voy, voy a encontrarme con ella durante tres minutos. Y miramos a los ciervos, miramos a los castores que están nadando en el estanque. Y es solo esto, como, vuelvo a mi escritorio. Y pienso, está bien, como si lo tuviera, todo está bien, no es tan estresante. No es el fin del mundo, como si todo fuera a estar bien, no necesito estar tan estresado como estoy. Y entonces creo que tomar eso, ya sabes, tomarte un minuto para dar un paso atrás, salir a caminar, no solo sentarte y comer tu almuerzo en tu escritorio o ya sabes, tratar de estresarse, comer tanto como puedas y luego correr. De vuelta a lo que sabes, tómate un par de minutos para salir a caminar, mira por la ventana a los árboles que están ahí afuera, tómate dos segundos para disfrutar de la nieve que ha caído. Y creo que esa es una de las cosas que más me ayuda. Y lo veo cuando la gente viene a visitar el centro ecológico también es como, ya sabes, tenemos algunas personas que tal vez trabajan en ese país a la vuelta de la esquina o se detendrán en su descanso para almorzar. Y solo tardan unos minutos en la cubierta. Y puedes ver, como en el grupo, cómo están hablando sobre el trabajo. Y luego regresan y dicen: No teníamos idea de que había una salida de estanque de castores allí. Cuéntanos más sobre eso. Ya sabes, y creo que solo tomarte un minuto para dar me gusta, date un segundo. Sí, sobre otra cosa realmente puede bajar ese nivel de estrés, como cuán ocupadas pueden estar las cosas.

Jessica Crate  
Bueno, podemos decir que estás aceptando este no, porque solo te estás fortaleciendo porque estás lleno de energía y relajado, pero estás tranquilo y es una persona increíble que se manifiesta a pesar de que ‘ estás haciendo zoom en un podcast. Es genial ver lo que puede hacer por tu salud mental y tu integridad mientras vives, trabajas y respiras aire, la gente entra. Y como nueva mamá, sé lo importante que es hacer una pausa y tomar un respiro. Ya sabes, encuentra tiempo para que tu salud se desconecte y se vuelva a conectar. Así que muchas gracias por compartir. Ahora. Esta es una de mis preguntas favoritas y Hunter, si pudieras agitar tu varita mágica. ¿Qué le gustaría ver o crear en nuestra comunidad ahora y en el futuro?

Hunter Klingensmith  
Oh, oh, hombre. Bien, entonces hay dos cosas, sé que la vivienda puede ser un gran problema para los trabajadores temporeros aquí en Park City. Y también ha sido un desafío para mí. Y entonces diría que probablemente mi principal prioridad sería encontrar una manera de tener más, y sé que estamos trabajando en esto, pero si pudiera mover una varita mágica y hacer que todo estuviera listo, lo habría hecho. un mejor equilibrio de disponibilidad para nuestros trabajadores de temporada y nuestros trabajadores que realmente están haciendo girar la comunidad turística. Además del alojamiento para nuestros visitantes, y la gente que viene, ya sabes, encontrando un feliz equilibrio allí. Y luego incluir mucho espacio abierto y espacio al aire libre porque creo que, como hemos estado hablando, es realmente importante poder salir. Así que probablemente sería mi primero. Y luego, el otro sería que tendríamos un descanso obligatorio de una hora a la mitad del día en el que nadie tiene que estar en el trabajo y todos pueden salir, o Takens. Y algo más que los haga felices. Entonces esas serían mis dos cosas.

Jessica Crate  
Me encanta. Y ya sabes, hace un tiempo, teníamos como Instagram, Facebook, todas las plataformas de redes sociales como cerradas por un día. No puedo decirte lo maravilloso que fue respirar. Y creo que si todos pudieran cerrar este pequeño gas, desconectarse y dirigirse al matamoscas, y trabajemos con Hunter para ayudar a construir este sueño de crear ecosistemas comunitarios más grandes y un lugar de serenidad que realmente cuando llegue allí, Verás cómo, cómo simplemente despeja tu mente, cuerpo, espíritu, y me encanta lo que has hablado hoy. Hunter, gracias por los consejos de acción, la historia de esta agua. Y finalmente, antes de que terminemos con esto, me gustaría, ya sabes, tener una idea de ti, ya sabes, decimos que se necesita una aldea, ya sabes, cómo ha sido parte de la cámara Communities That Care Summit County realmente te ayudó en tu trabajo?

Hunter Klingensmith  
Sí, entonces creo que, ya sabes, comencé en esta posición, sin saber mucho sobre exhibiciones o el mundo de nuestra comunidad sin fines de lucro. Y creo que ser parte de la cámara y tener estos otros negocios o mentores o, ya sabes, gente con la que conversar y comprender mejor cómo funciona todo en nuestra comunidad es algo enorme, no solo para mí, sino para nuestra organización en su conjunto. , ya sabes, tener a alguien que se comunique conmigo, como, Oye, estamos luchando con esto, o no estamos llegando a esta parte de nuestra comunidad a la que realmente queremos llegar, y tener ese grupo de personas que también son parte de la cámara, y realmente ayuda porque puedes acercarte y obtener ayuda y la gente puede venir a nosotros y te da esto como un punto de partida sin tener que llamar a la gente en frío y decir, oye, tú ‘ nunca había oído hablar de nosotros antes. ¿Pero podrías ayudarnos?

Jessica Crate  
Si, exacto.

Hunter Klingensmith  
Realmente aprecio tener esa conexión.

Jessica Crate  
Increíble. Y sabes, lo grandioso es que estás dejando un legado y estás ayudando al Swaner a vivir y crear un legado, lo cual es genial. Cómo estás ayudando, sabes, estoy seguro de que los niños pequeños y las personas que han pasado desde 1993, creo, en 1993 tienen historias de visitar a este monstruo y todas las cosas que estás haciendo allí. Por último, pero no menos importante, Hunter. Y si pudiera dejar una cita, un mantra o una herramienta de elementos de acción para nuestros espectadores, oyentes y aquellos que se suscriben a nuestro blog. ¿Qué le gustaría dejar con nuestros oyentes hoy?

Hunter Klingensmith  
Bueno, muchas gracias por invitarme. Y yo diría que simplemente salga, no traiga su teléfono o traiga su teléfono, escuche un podcast, lo que sea. Salga, respire el buen aire. Y tómate un minuto y luego vuelve a lo que estás haciendo y me sentiré mejor.

Jessica Crate  
E incluso si son cinco minutos en un día de nieve, les digo que hicimos esto esta mañana y está tan despejado, tan limpio y es hermoso afuera. Así que muchas gracias Hunter en nombre de nuestra directora ejecutiva, Mary Christa Smith y yo mismo, y ztc, muchas gracias por sintonizarnos. Y por suscribirse. Puede encontrar un enlace a todos nuestros videos y podcasts en CTC summit county.org. Así que nuevamente, gracias por su tiempo hoy. Por favor, si encuentra valor en esto, como nosotros, envíenos un tweet para compartirnos. Comparta esto, recomiéndenos a otros y esperamos verlo todos los lunes en nuestro lunes de salud mental. De nuevo, gracias por sintonizar Hunter. Nos veremos pronto en el Swaner. Y gracias a todos por escucharnos hoy. Adiós por ahora.

Hunter Klingensmith  
Muchas gracias.

Upcoming Events