Mental Health Mondays with Jennifer Wesselhoff of the Park City Chamber

Mar 29, 2022 | Mental Health Mondays

Jennifer Wesselhoff is the President & CEO of the Park City Chamber of Commerce | Convention & Visitors Bureau (Chamber/Bureau). She has served in the position since October 2020. The Park City Chamber/Bureau is responsible for the marketing and management of Utah’s preeminent luxury tourism destination, driving revenues in excess of $1 billion annually. Park City is home to the Sundance Film Festival, the nation’s largest independent film event. The town’s two ski resorts served as major event sites for the 2002 Winter Olympic Games and the Utah Olympic Park continues to attract Olympians to Park City for high-altitude training. The town also is the headquarters for the US Ski & Snowboard Association (USSA). Park City hosts ski and snowboarding world championships on an annual basis and the United States Olympic Committee (USOC) has selected Utah for its next Winter Olympic bid in 2030. More than two million skiers hit the local slopes each year at both Park City Mountain, featuring the nation’s largest ski terrain, and Deer Valley Resort, consistently rated amongst the top ski resorts in North America. In summer months, more than one million visitors flock to Park City for hiking, blue-ribbon fly-fishing and biking on its 400-mile trail system.

www.ParkCityChamber.com
www.VisitParkCity.com

https://www.facebook.com/ParkCityChamberofCommerce
https://www.facebook.com/VisitParkCity/
https://twitter.com/VisitParkCity
https://www.instagram.com/visitparkcity/

Jessica Crate
Hello everyone and welcome to our Mental Health Mondays at Communities That Care video podcast discussing mental health. My name is Jessica Crate Oveson. I’m the visionary spokeswoman for CTC Summit County, and it Communities That Care Summit County Our vision is truly a world of connection, vitality and well being where kids and families thrive. And our mission is to collaboratively improve the lives of youth and families by fostering a culture of health through prevention. So at CTC, we have the same connection is prevention. And in the spirit of community connection, we are delighted to have here Jennifer Wesselhoff of the Chamber she is the president and CEO of the Park City Chamber of Commerce Convention and Visitor’s Bureau here in Park City. She has served this position since October 2020, which not easy and she’s going to dive into what all happened during that time. But prior to arriving in Park City, we’re fortunate to have Jennifer she was the CEO and President of the Sedona Chamber of Commerce and Tourism Bureau, which she joined in 2007. During her tenure, she led Sedona, Arizona to a national recognition as a destination she guided the Sedona chambers accreditation as a destination management organization led the development of Arizona’s first sustainable tourism plan, and saw tourism grow to become Sedonas largest industry with a billion dollar annual impact and 10,000 tourism related jobs. She most recently represented the region on the Governor’s Economic Recovery Task Force and has launched several brand strategies, including Sedonas most beautiful places centers campaign find room to play etc. So Jennifer, we are so excited to have you part of Park City, you come with a lot of experience, you have been a speaker and worked in so many different conditions, which you will talk about. And what I love the most is that before joining joining the Sedona Chamber of Commerce, you also taught English in Japan, and three years in the hospitality industry in Interlaken Switzerland, you hold a bachelor’s degree in French and Communications from Miami University in Oxford, Ohio. And when you and your husband Rick are not running, biking, and hiking and enjoying all the things in Park City, you enjoy cooking and traveling with friends. So what an amazing background. Jennifer, thank you so much for taking the time to hang out with us on our Mental Health Mondays video podcast. Let’s talk a little bit more about you tell us a bit more about yourself, the organization, the chamber and why you love our community?

Jennifer Wesselhoff
Well, first of all, thank you so much for having me, we are a proud sponsor of your organization and what you do to help our residents and our employees. And our community in general is so important, especially during these crazy COVID times it’s become even more apparent the need to to care for each other and care for ourselves now, more than ever. So thank you for all the great work that you do in our community. I’m thrilled to be part of it. Moving here in October 2020, in the middle of COVID was, first of all very hard decision after being in Sedona for 20 years, to leave a community in the middle of COVID with so much uncertainty where my heart has been for such a long time was a very hard thing to do. But such an opportunity to to change and to challenge myself both professionally and personally. And to be part of Park City which has always been on my radar for this position and also this community. So I’m just incredibly grateful to be here. There’s so much about Park City that I love, and also so much that I I see opportunity for our organization to really play an important role in being a catalyst for positive change and expanding the role of our organization a little bit more than what it has been in the past.

Jessica Crate
But we are so grateful to have you here with your knowledge experience your talents and skills and and also to have the chamber as our title sponsor for this video podcast and for the things we have going on to improve mental health in our community. So let’s dive into that. You know, you work in the chamber, and you guys are located at Hugo Coffee right up in the heart of Park City. Talk about how your organization fosters Youth and Family Well Being through prevention in our community.

Jennifer Wesselhoff
Well, let me tell you first a little bit about Chambers of Commerce in general and Convention and Visitor’s Bureau. What more of a traditional chamber and tourism bureau looks like and A little bit more of the vision of where we’d like to go with, with the organization and some new strategies. So first of all, we’re we’re actually sort of two functions, two organizations under one umbrella, we act as a chamber of commerce. And we also act as a Convention and Visitor’s Bureau. And in a lot of communities, especially larger communities, those organizations are separate. Typically, you have a chamber of commerce as a 501 C six organization, it’s a membership organization. And it’s focused very much on helping businesses do business locally, helping provide skill building programs and networking opportunities and marketing exposure for businesses, encouraging locals to shop local, oftentimes looking at business attraction, and trying to attract business to the community, and also to retain the businesses in the community. We do all of that. And I like to say that the Chamber side of what we do is really the foundation of our organization, we have just about 950 members who are part of our organization. And I like to say that the Chamber of Commerce really tries to stir that local money pot, we’re trying to get money to move around the community, and stay in the community encouraging people to shop local and do business locally as well. The Convention and Visitor’s Bureau side is also it’s a little bit different than the chamber function, but very synergistic in that we’re responsible for going outside of the community to bring new money in related to visitor spending. So oftentimes, the community won’t see what we’re doing. Because we’re not marketing to the community, the community is already here. We’re marketing to potential visitors and California and New York and our target markets, both domestic and international. We do a lot of work in our group sales department as an effort to try to drive group market and meetings, corporate meetings and board retreats to bring those here to Park City to try to drive a little bit more of our need period, which typically has been spring and fall and also summer and mid week. So I like to say that the Convention Visitors Bureau side of what we do brings new money into the community, and the Chamber of Commerce stirs that money up. So it really goes well together. And most communities who are tourism related where tourism is their primary economic generator, it makes a lot of sense to have the organization’s be under one umbrella. So I’m pleased that were set up this way. Because it also gives us a tremendous amount of leverage and also influence when we start talking about changing behaviors. Having a membership of over 950 businesses allows us to communicate with them in ways that could be really meaningful, meaningful in terms of their employees and communicating strategies and incentives and resources to their employees, but also using them because they’re oftentimes the front liners to communicate to visitors as well influencing visitor behavior in a more meaningful way in our community, looking at where we’re sending visitors, in terms of trail heads, and how visitors are moving around our community, can we encourage both employees and visitors to carpool or take transit, because after all, you know every car we get off the road, hopefully improves traffic and congestion, which we know is a pinch point for our residents. So the future of our organization is really sort of moving away from more of a traditional model of how chambers and Convention Visitors bureaus have been primarily focused on visitors and businesses. We’re expanding that view to be a little bit more honest about the trade off of a thriving economy and a successful economy and a robust volume of visitors recognizing those trade offs and being more thoughtful about how we can mitigate some of the potential what some people might see negative impacts of the tourism industry.

Jessica Crate
Well, I love that you have such a forward thinking mentality about the whole way you’re approaching stirring the pot and working with the different facets of the chamber. It’s, it’s phenomenal to have you here and especially as we have gone through and or coming through a pandemic and dealing with all the challenges of being in a resort town. And and dealing with the tourist ins and outs and ups and downs and all the fluctuations I’m sure you’ve seen, you’ve done a phenomenal job, let’s let’s talk about the role. You know, community connectedness obviously has a huge role, not only for you for our community, but how that plays into wellbeing and have you what have you experienced with maybe the chamber yourself as to contributing to the health and vitality of our community,

Jennifer Wesselhoff
I feel that connectedness and I love that you use that word, because it’s a word that I use quite a bit in, when explaining what sustainable tourism is, we’re embarking on this sustainable tourism plan for Park City and Summit County. And so much of the essence of what we’re trying to do is, of course, rooted in people in the planet and in prosperity, when you think about quality of life and the environment, and also a thriving economy and trying to balance all of those things. And it’s tricky business, you know, organizations like ours have typically counted the number of businesses as a metric of success, or we’ve counted bed taxes or sales taxes or occupancy rates and real strong economic measures. And typically, that’s the easy way to garner and to measure success, the softer parts of quality of life, and the health and well being of our people are much harder to to quantify what success looks like. And, you know, as a chamber of commerce, being able to really focus our efforts on our employers, and our employees, is really going to be a critical part of our sustainable tourism plan. That people part also includes our residents. And the issues get so complex, you know, when you start to think about successful business, you think about labor shortage, and you think about the need for employees, and then you think about affordable housing, and can our employees afford to live here. And if they can’t, then they’re, they’re traveling in to our communities to work, which is also creating burden on our infrastructure on our roads and our traffic and our transit. I mean, there’s so much connectedness to our business community, our employees, our people. And we’re trying to better understand that and and see where we can be a catalyst for positive change in bringing up issues that are important to our business community, and advocating for those issues, both at the local, the regional and the state government levels. So that our people are top of mind when we’re looking at programs and resources and funding. They’re they’re hard complex issues, which is typically why chambers of commerce and Convention and Visitor’s Bureau don’t do the work. Because it’s, it’s tough, it’s hard work. And it’s hard to to gauge success, especially when you’re using public dollars. You know, we’re using primarily bed tax dollars, which is a discriminatory tax against the lodgers who are paying that that tax are carrying the burden of that tax while they may be passing it along to their their clients and their visitors. It’s important that that those tax dollars be reinvested where they’re discriminant discriminating against, but without the employees without a healthy base. For of our employees, that experience that we’re able to provide to both our locals and our visitors will really quickly become diminished. And there was one real strong moment in the last 18 months since I’ve been here. That was almost like a canary in the coalmine. mind for me. Several months ago, I did a tour of some of our competitive competitive destinations in Colorado, so that I can get a better understanding of how Park City is different. And also to meet my counterparts there who many of which I’ve known for a long time, but not through the lens of now this new position and the role of our of our organization in the community. And I visited my counterpart and ask them, and one of the things that she told me, still gives me the chills, she talked about the high level of suicides in the frontline workers in Aspen. And it was startling to me. And I thought, Oh, we don’t want to be like, ask them what what’s going on? You know, what’s happening there? What can what can we learn from, from their experience, and she said, The stark difference between the haves and the have nots in Aspen creates this sense of hopelessness with our employees and with their employees and their front liners. And I thought to myself, I said, you know, we don’t want Park City to be like that, we need to recognize and acknowledge and value our employees. Now more than ever, and talking about this in the community, and understanding what Park City used to be like, when, when folks would come here to work and be a ski balm for the season. I think they had more fun back then, from you know, from what I understand they, you know, Park City was just a different place, it was more affordable, it was easier to live, it was easier to make a living. And you know, people could work one job or two jobs and still have time to get out on the slopes and have fun with their with their friends. And you know, now with the cost of living and the cost of housing being what it is. I think a lot of our employees are working two, three jobs and don’t have a lot of time for fun. So what can we do as a community to not only recognize the employees for really the foundation and everything that we come to enjoy here in Park City, but how can we provide resources to them, help them have more fun, and feel a sense of connectedness to, to our community so that we don’t have this have and have not, you know, mentality?

Jessica Crate
Well, first of all, I love your perspective. And I’m so glad that we have you, so to speak in the trenches, really bringing forth these issues and diving into do the hard work. Because it is hard work. But it’s good work. And it’s amazing work to really help people feel the synergy and the connectedness and not lose sight of why we live in this beautiful place and get and get lost in the day to day grind in the shuffle and the dichotomy of different areas of expertise and levels and all the things so thank you for all the hard work you’re doing in in throughout the community to to bring those different areas together and keep it sustainable and connected. You know, we talk a lot here on this podcast about substance use mental health issues, wellness issues about living in a resort town, you touched on several of them, you know, what do you see in your work? And maybe what are some tips and resources you recommend for our viewers?

Jennifer Wesselhoff
Well, you number one, the resources that you provide to our employees are and to the community, in general is is critical. It’s one of the reasons why we we want to be more involved and support Communities That Care and the great work that you’re doing. Because technically, that’s not our lane. You know, we would rather support the great work that you guys are doing and other nonprofits, the Christian Center, the people’s health clinic, there are so many incredible nonprofits here doing the work. And I think the role that we can play is supporting them, advocating that for them. Providing resources where we have resources available, and sharing the word making sure that our businesses, our owners, and our workers are aware of the resources that are available for them. And really just amplifying the great work that many of our organizations are already doing. It doesn’t make sense to duplicate those efforts. But to be able to use the power of Our influence to help amplify the great work that’s already happening happening in the community is going to be a really important role for us. On another hand, I think opportunities to partner with those associations and those organizations to go where the employees are. It’s one of the things that is really on my mind, as we’re thinking about planning for the upcoming year of what can we do to go where the people are, and provide a mobile wellness unit of sorts, where we go to Park City, you know, we go to Park City Municipal, or we go to the base, or we go to the canyons, or we go to deer valley, instead of asking employees to come to us, how can we collectively go to them and show them how much we appreciate the work that they’re doing, recognize their work. And while we’re at it, also share with them the resources that are available. So I’m really anxious to kind of delve a little bit deeper into that opportunity for the upcoming year and see how we can maybe leverage some of our resources, to also make sure that we have a thriving base of our employees who really make this billion dollar industry that we have here in Park City, the tourism industry, and the quality of life and the amenities that we have that our residents have really come to expect. We need to show those workers that that they are the reason why we have such a high quality

Jessica Crate
100% and we always say to it takes a village. And so we thank you for being a part of our village and supporting all the different facets in the community that are in supportive, you know, raising the bar continuing to help youth and families thrive, employees, workers, because it’s all that ripple effect. So I love your thought process on that as well. You know, I love to get to the action items and to say like those of you tuning in listening in reading this watching this right now, what is one action item that someone can do Jennifer right now today, to foster their well being during this time and for ourselves to stay connected in the community.

Jennifer Wesselhoff
You know, for me, what has been just so meaningful is just getting outside. Whether that’s on the mountain, or just going for a walk around the block, that has been so important to me just the fresh air. It clears my mind in a way that not a lot of other things can do. But also just a kind word. I think more than anything, we don’t take enough time to be kind to each other. And is that something that as we’re working with, with visitors and reminding them how to love Park City, the way that we LOVE Park City to keep it sustainable into the future. Kindness has got to be amazing that this day and age we have to remind people to be kind. But it is it’s just that simple. gesture, showing people some kindness and caring. It really really truly goes a long way.

Jessica Crate
I love that we’ll get outside today folks, show some kindness because when you give it out, it comes back tenfold. And I love that Jennifer and last but not least, this is one of our favorite questions. If you could wave your magic wand, what would you like to see or create in our community moving forward?

Jennifer Wesselhoff
Harmony.

Jessica Crate
Amazing!

Jennifer Wesselhoff
More harmony, greater understanding that we’re all doing the best that we can at every level from the business owner to the to the corporation, to the employees to the nonprofits to the residents that you know we we all really do have the best interest of Park City at heart we may not agree on how to get there. But we have the ability to to have deeper conversations to be respectful and to create great harmony for the greater good of Park City and I’m just really excited to be able to be part of that.

Jessica Crate
Well we’re super fortunate to have you part of it. And and you’ve been part of the chamber for nearly two years now. So what has been your biggest highlight your biggest lightbulb moment and what is your quote or mantra you’d like to leave with our viewers today?

Jennifer Wesselhoff
One of my biggest surprises in the last 18 months was the the number of Residents who participated in our sustainable tourism plan survey, we had almost 2700 people participate in that survey. And there were some hard truths in that survey. In fact, we’re just getting ready to unveil it. At the time of this podcast, I think people will be able to go to parkcitychamber.com/sustainabletourismplan and see some of the results of that survey. Because those will be our marching, our marching orders for how we move forward, to help create a more sustainable Park City. I think if I had one more mantra right now, it’s that together we thrive. And that that collaboration, that partnership, and it’s happening at so many levels in this community, the community leaders at the county and the elected officials at the county in the city, community leaders at nonprofits, we all work so well together. And I think if anything that comes out of this, this planning process for sustainable tourism plan, it’s this great desire to partner and collaborate and work together for the betterment of a more sustainable Park City. And I couldn’t be more thrilled to be in a community that wants that that’s willing to work for it. And that’s willing to work together to make it happen.

Jessica Crate
I love that and we’re this is just so exciting to know that you are behind the scenes really at the forefront and in the trenches. But working so hard to to continue that thriving atmosphere, that harmony and the community moving forward in Park City. So again, thank you so much, Jennifer, for being on here with us today for supporting this podcast. And on behalf of our executive director, Mary Christa and myself. We’d like to thank you all for tuning in. Thank you for joining us each and every Monday on our Mental Health Mondays and video podcast Communities That Care Summit County. You can find a link to all of our podcasts on our blog at www.ctcsummitcounty.org and we look forward to hearing you again soon. Please like this, share it out, subscribe for notifications on social media. And if you have somebody you’d like to hear from or would recommend, we would be happy to hear from you and continue to propel this community forward. So thank you again for being on. Have a wonderful week. Bye for now. Thank you

Jessica Crate
Hola a todos y bienvenidos a nuestro podcast de video de los lunes de salud mental en Communities That Care que analiza la salud mental. Mi nombre es Jessica Crate Oveson. Soy la vocera visionaria de CTC Summit County, y Comunidades que se preocupan Summit County Nuestra visión es verdaderamente un mundo de conexión, vitalidad y bienestar donde los niños y las familias prosperan. Y nuestra misión es mejorar en colaboración las vidas de los jóvenes y las familias fomentando una cultura de salud a través de la prevención. Entonces en CTC, tenemos la misma conexión que es la prevención. Y en el espíritu de conexión con la comunidad, estamos encantados de tener aquí a Jennifer Wesselhoff de la Cámara, ella es la presidenta y directora ejecutiva de la Oficina de Convenciones y Visitantes de la Cámara de Comercio de Park City aquí en Park City. Ha ocupado este puesto desde octubre de 2020, lo cual no es fácil y se sumergirá en lo que sucedió durante ese tiempo. Pero antes de llegar a Park City, tenemos la suerte de tener a Jennifer, quien fue directora ejecutiva y presidenta de la Oficina de Turismo y Cámara de Comercio de Sedona, a la que se unió en 2007. Durante su mandato, llevó a Sedona, Arizona, a un reconocimiento nacional. como destino, guió la acreditación de las cámaras de Sedona como organización de gestión de destinos, lideró el desarrollo del primer plan de turismo sostenible de Arizona y vio crecer el turismo hasta convertirse en la industria más grande de Sedona con un impacto anual de mil millones de dólares y 10,000 empleos relacionados con el turismo. Recientemente representó a la región en el Grupo de Trabajo de Recuperación Económica del Gobernador y ha lanzado varias estrategias de marca, incluida la campaña de los centros de los lugares más hermosos de Sedona para encontrar espacio para jugar, etc. Entonces, Jennifer, estamos muy emocionados de que seas parte de Park City, ven con mucha experiencia, has sido ponente y trabajado en tantas condiciones diferentes, de las que hablarás. Y lo que más me gusta es que antes de unirte a la Cámara de Comercio de Sedona, también enseñaste inglés en Japón, y tres años en la industria hotelera en Interlaken Suiza, tienes una licenciatura en Francés y Comunicaciones de la Universidad de Miami en Oxford, Ohio. Y cuando usted y su esposo Rick no están corriendo, andando en bicicleta, caminando y disfrutando de todas las cosas en Park City, disfrutan cocinar y viajar con amigos. Entonces, qué increíble fondo. Jennifer, muchas gracias por tomarse el tiempo para pasar el rato con nosotros en nuestro video podcast de Mental Health Mondays. Hablemos un poco más sobre ti, cuéntanos un poco más sobre ti, la organización, la cámara y por qué amas a nuestra comunidad.

Jennifer Wesselhoff
Bueno, en primer lugar, muchas gracias por invitarme, somos un patrocinador orgulloso de su organización y de lo que hace para ayudar a nuestros residentes y empleados. Y nuestra comunidad en general es muy importante, especialmente durante estos tiempos locos de COVID, se ha vuelto aún más evidente la necesidad de cuidarnos unos a otros y cuidarnos a nosotros mismos ahora, más que nunca. Así que gracias por todo el gran trabajo que haces en nuestra comunidad. Estoy emocionado de ser parte de esto. Mudarme aquí en octubre de 2020, en medio de COVID fue, en primer lugar, una decisión muy difícil después de estar en Sedona durante 20 años, dejar una comunidad en medio de COVID con tanta incertidumbre donde mi corazón ha estado durante tanto tiempo. fue algo muy difícil de hacer. Pero tal oportunidad para cambiar y desafiarme tanto profesional como personalmente. Y ser parte de Park City, que siempre ha estado en mi radar para este puesto y también para esta comunidad. Así que estoy increíblemente agradecido de estar aquí. Hay tanto de Park City que me encanta, y también tanto que veo la oportunidad de que nuestra organización realmente desempeñe un papel importante como catalizador de un cambio positivo y expanda el papel de nuestra organización un poco más de lo que ha sido. en el pasado.

Jessica Crate
Pero estamos muy agradecidos de tenerlo aquí con su conocimiento, experiencia, sus talentos y habilidades y también de tener a la cámara como nuestro patrocinador principal para este video podcast y por las cosas que estamos haciendo para mejorar la salud mental en nuestra comunidad. Así que profundicemos en eso. Ya sabes, trabajas en la cámara, y están ubicados en Hugo Coffee justo en el corazón de Park City. Hable acerca de cómo su organización fomenta el Bienestar Juvenil y Familiar a través de la prevención en nuestra comunidad.

Jennifer Wesselhoff
Bueno, déjame contarte primero un poco sobre las Cámaras de Comercio en general y la Oficina de Convenciones y Visitantes. Qué más parece una oficina de cámara y turismo tradicional y un poco más de la visión de hacia dónde nos gustaría ir, con la organización y algunas estrategias nuevas. En primer lugar, en realidad somos una especie de dos funciones, dos organizaciones bajo un mismo paraguas, actuamos como una cámara de comercio. Y también actuamos como Oficina de Convenciones y Visitantes. Y en muchas comunidades, especialmente en las comunidades más grandes, esas organizaciones están separadas. Por lo general, tiene una cámara de comercio como una organización 501 C seis, es una organización de membresía. Y se centra en gran medida en ayudar a las empresas a hacer negocios localmente, ayudando a proporcionar programas de desarrollo de habilidades y oportunidades de creación de redes y exposición de marketing para las empresas, alentando a los locales a comprar localmente, a menudo buscando la atracción comercial y tratando de atraer negocios a la comunidad, y también a conservar los negocios en la comunidad. Hacemos todo eso. Y me gusta decir que el lado de la Cámara de lo que hacemos es realmente la base de nuestra organización, tenemos alrededor de 950 miembros que forman parte de nuestra organización. Y me gusta decir que la Cámara de Comercio realmente trata de agitar esa fuente de dinero local, estamos tratando de obtener dinero para moverse por la comunidad y permanecer en la comunidad alentando a las personas a comprar localmente y hacer negocios localmente también. El lado de la Oficina de Convenciones y Visitantes también es un poco diferente a la función de la cámara, pero muy sinérgico en el sentido de que somos responsables de salir de la comunidad para traer dinero nuevo relacionado con los gastos de los visitantes. A menudo, la comunidad no verá lo que estamos haciendo. Porque no estamos comercializando a la comunidad, la comunidad ya está aquí. Estamos comercializando para visitantes potenciales y California y Nueva York y nuestros mercados objetivo, tanto nacionales como internacionales. Trabajamos mucho en nuestro departamento de ventas grupales como un esfuerzo para tratar de impulsar el mercado y las reuniones grupales, las reuniones corporativas y los retiros de la junta para traerlos aquí a Park City para tratar de impulsar un poco más de nuestro período de necesidad, que generalmente ha sido primavera y otoño y también verano y entre semana. Así que me gusta decir que el lado de la Oficina de Visitantes de Convenciones de lo que hacemos trae dinero nuevo a la comunidad, y la Cámara de Comercio remueve ese dinero. Así que realmente va bien juntos. Y la mayoría de las comunidades que están relacionadas con el turismo donde el turismo es su principal generador económico, tiene mucho sentido que la organización esté bajo un mismo paraguas. Así que me complace que se hayan configurado de esta manera. Porque también nos da una tremenda cantidad de influencia y también influencia cuando empezamos a hablar de cambiar comportamientos. Tener una membresía de más de 950 empresas nos permite comunicarnos con ellos de maneras que podrían ser realmente significativas en términos de sus empleados y comunicar estrategias, incentivos y recursos a sus empleados, pero también usarlos porque a menudo son los de primera línea. para comunicarnos con los visitantes e influir en el comportamiento de los visitantes de una manera más significativa en nuestra comunidad, observando a dónde enviamos a los visitantes, en términos de senderos y cómo los visitantes se mueven por nuestra comunidad, ¿podemos alentar tanto a los empleados como a los visitantes a compartir el viaje o tomar el transporte público, porque después de todo, usted sabe que cada automóvil que sacamos de la carretera, con suerte, mejora el tráfico y la congestión, que sabemos que es un punto crítico para nuestros residentes. Entonces, el futuro de nuestra organización es realmente alejarse de un modelo más tradicional de cómo las cámaras y las oficinas de visitantes de convenciones se han centrado principalmente en los visitantes y las empresas. Estamos ampliando esa visión para ser un poco más honestos sobre la compensación de una economía próspera y una economía exitosa y un volumen sólido de visitantes que reconocen esas compensaciones y son más reflexivos sobre cómo podemos mitigar parte del potencial que algunos la gente podría ver los impactos negativos de la industria del turismo.

Jessica Crate
Bueno, me encanta que tengas una mentalidad tan progresista sobre la forma en que te acercas a revolver la olla y trabajar con las diferentes facetas de la cámara. Es, es fenomenal tenerte aquí y especialmente porque hemos atravesado una pandemia y lidiamos con todos los desafíos de estar en una ciudad turística. Y lidiando con los altibajos turísticos y todas las fluctuaciones que estoy seguro que has visto, has hecho un trabajo fenomenal, hablemos del papel. Usted sabe, la conexión de la comunidad obviamente tiene un papel muy importante, no solo para usted para nuestra comunidad, sino también cómo eso juega en el bienestar y lo que ha experimentado con tal vez la cámara para contribuir a la salud y la vitalidad de nuestra comunidad.

Jennifer Wesselhoff
Siento esa conexión y me encanta que use esa palabra, porque es una palabra que uso bastante cuando explico qué es el turismo sostenible, nos estamos embarcando en este plan de turismo sostenible para Park City y Summit County. Y gran parte de la esencia de lo que estamos tratando de hacer está, por supuesto, arraigado en las personas del planeta y en la prosperidad, cuando piensas en la calidad de vida y el medio ambiente, y también en una economía próspera y tratando de equilibrar todo. de esas cosas Y es un negocio complicado, ya sabes, las organizaciones como la nuestra generalmente han contado la cantidad de negocios como una medida de éxito, o hemos contado los impuestos por cama o los impuestos sobre las ventas o las tasas de ocupación y medidas económicas realmente sólidas. Y, por lo general, esa es la manera más fácil de obtener y medir el éxito, las partes más suaves de la calidad de vida y la salud y el bienestar de nuestra gente son mucho más difíciles de cuantificar cómo se ve el éxito. Y, como cámara de comercio, poder centrar realmente nuestros esfuerzos en nuestros empleadores y nuestros empleados será una parte fundamental de nuestro plan de turismo sostenible. Esa parte de la gente también incluye a nuestros residentes. Y los problemas se vuelven tan complejos, ya sabes, cuando comienzas a pensar en un negocio exitoso, piensas en la escasez de mano de obra, y piensas en la necesidad de empleados, y luego piensas en viviendas asequibles, y ¿pueden nuestros empleados vivir aquí? . Y si no pueden, entonces están, están viajando a nuestras comunidades para trabajar, lo que también está creando una carga para nuestra infraestructura en nuestras carreteras y nuestro tráfico y nuestro tránsito. Quiero decir, hay tanta conexión con nuestra comunidad empresarial, nuestros empleados, nuestra gente. Y estamos tratando de comprender mejor eso y ver dónde podemos ser un catalizador para un cambio positivo al plantear problemas que son importantes para nuestra comunidad empresarial y abogar por esos problemas, tanto en el gobierno local, regional y estatal. niveles. Para que nuestra gente sea lo más importante cuando buscamos programas, recursos y financiamiento. Son temas difíciles y complejos, razón por la cual las cámaras de comercio y la Oficina de Convenciones y Visitantes no hacen el trabajo. Porque es, es duro, es un trabajo duro. Y es difícil medir el éxito, especialmente cuando se utilizan dólares públicos. Ya sabe, estamos utilizando principalmente dólares de impuestos por alojamiento, que es un impuesto discriminatorio contra los inquilinos que pagan ese impuesto y soportan la carga de ese impuesto mientras se lo pasan a sus clientes y visitantes. Es importante que esos dólares de impuestos se reinviertan donde discriminan discriminando, pero sin los empleados sin una base saludable. Para nuestros empleados, esa experiencia que podemos brindar tanto a nuestros locales como a nuestros visitantes disminuirá rápidamente. Y hubo un momento realmente fuerte en los últimos 18 meses desde que llegué aquí. Eso fue casi como un canario en la mina de carbón. mente para mí. Hace varios meses, hice un recorrido por algunos de nuestros destinos competitivos competitivos en Colorado, para poder comprender mejor cómo Park City es diferente. Y también para conocer a mis homólogos allí, muchos de los cuales conozco desde hace mucho tiempo, pero no a través de la lente de este nuevo puesto y el papel de nuestra organización en la comunidad. Y visité a mi contraparte y les pregunté, y una de las cosas que me dijo, todavía me da escalofríos, habló sobre el alto nivel de suicidios en los trabajadores de primera línea en Aspen. Y fue sorprendente para mí. Y pensé, Oh, no queremos ser como, pregúntales qué está pasando. Ya sabes, ¿qué está pasando allí? ¿Qué podemos aprender de, de su experiencia, y ella dijo, La gran diferencia entre los que tienen y los que no tienen en Aspen crea esta sensación de desesperanza con nuestros empleados y con sus empleados y sus líneas frontales. Y pensé para mis adentros, dije, ya sabes, no queremos que Park City sea así, debemos reconocer, reconocer y valorar a nuestros empleados. Ahora más que nunca, y hablando de esto en la comunidad, y entendiendo cómo solía ser Park City, cuándo, cuándo la gente venía aquí a trabajar y ser un bálsamo de esquí para la temporada. Creo que se divertían más en ese entonces, por lo que entiendo, Park City era simplemente un lugar diferente, era más asequible, era más fácil vivir, era más fácil ganarse la vida. Y ya sabes, la gente podría trabajar en uno o dos trabajos y aún así tener tiempo para salir a las pistas y divertirse con sus amigos. Y ya sabes, ahora con el costo de vida y el costo de la vivienda siendo lo que es. Creo que muchos de nuestros empleados tienen dos o tres trabajos y no tienen mucho tiempo para divertirse. Entonces, ¿qué podemos hacer como comunidad para no solo reconocer a los empleados por la base y todo lo que venimos a disfrutar aquí en Park City, sino también cómo podemos brindarles recursos, ayudarlos a divertirse más y tener una sensación de conexión con nuestra comunidad para que no tengamos esta mentalidad de tener y no tener, ¿sabes?

Jessica Crate
Bueno, antes que nada, me encanta tu perspectiva. Y estoy muy contento de que los tengamos, por así decirlo, en las trincheras, sacando a relucir estos problemas y sumergiéndonos en hacer el trabajo duro. Porque es un trabajo duro. Pero es un buen trabajo. Y es un trabajo increíble realmente ayudar a las personas a sentir la sinergia y la conexión y no perder de vista por qué vivimos en este hermoso lugar y nos perdemos y nos perdemos en el día a día, la confusión y la dicotomía de diferentes áreas de experiencia y niveles. y todas las cosas, así que gracias por todo el arduo trabajo que está haciendo en toda la comunidad para unir esas diferentes áreas y mantenerlas sostenibles y conectadas. Sabes, hablamos mucho aquí en este podcast sobre problemas de salud mental por uso de sustancias, problemas de bienestar sobre vivir en una ciudad turística, mencionaste varios de ellos, sabes, ¿qué ves en tu trabajo? Y tal vez, ¿cuáles son algunos consejos y recursos que recomienda para nuestros espectadores?

Jennifer Wesselhoff
Bueno, número uno, los recursos que proporciona a nuestros empleados y a la comunidad, en general, son críticos. Es una de las razones por las que queremos estar más involucrados y apoyar a Communities That Care y el gran trabajo que están haciendo. Porque técnicamente, ese no es nuestro carril. Saben, preferimos apoyar el gran trabajo que están haciendo ustedes y otras organizaciones sin fines de lucro, el Centro Cristiano, la clínica de salud del pueblo, hay tantas organizaciones sin fines de lucro increíbles aquí haciendo el trabajo. Y creo que el papel que podemos desempeñar es apoyarlos, abogar por ellos. Proporcionar recursos donde tenemos recursos disponibles y compartir la palabra asegurándonos de que nuestras empresas, nuestros propietarios y nuestros trabajadores estén al tanto de los recursos que están disponibles para ellos. Y realmente amplificando el gran trabajo que muchas de nuestras organizaciones ya están haciendo. No tiene sentido duplicar esos esfuerzos. Pero poder usar el poder de Nuestra influencia para ayudar a amplificar el gran trabajo que ya está sucediendo en la comunidad será un papel muy importante para nosotros. Por otro lado, creo oportunidades para asociarme con esas asociaciones y esas organizaciones para ir donde están los empleados. Es una de las cosas que realmente tengo en mente, ya que estamos pensando en planificar para el próximo año qué podemos hacer para ir a donde está la gente y proporcionar una especie de unidad de bienestar móvil, donde vamos a Park City. , ya sabes, vamos a Park City Municipal, o vamos a la base, o vamos a los cañones, o vamos a Deer Valley, en lugar de pedirles a los empleados que vengan a nosotros, ¿cómo podemos ir a ellos colectivamente y mostrarles ellos cuánto apreciamos el trabajo que están haciendo, reconocer su trabajo. Y mientras estamos en eso, también comparta con ellos los recursos que están disponibles. Así que estoy realmente ansioso por profundizar un poco más en esa oportunidad para el próximo año y ver cómo podemos aprovechar algunos de nuestros recursos, para asegurarnos también de que tenemos una base próspera de nuestros empleados que realmente hacen esto. industria de mil millones de dólares que tenemos aquí en Park City, la industria del turismo y la calidad de vida y las comodidades que tenemos que nuestros residentes realmente esperan. Necesitamos mostrarles a esos trabajadores que ellos son la razón por la que tenemos una calidad tan alta.

Jessica Crate
100% y siempre decimos que se necesita un pueblo. Y entonces, le agradecemos por ser parte de nuestro pueblo y apoyar todas las diferentes facetas de la comunidad que apoyan, ya saben, elevando el nivel para continuar ayudando a los jóvenes y las familias a prosperar, a los empleados, a los trabajadores, porque es todo ese efecto dominó. . Así que me encanta tu proceso de pensamiento sobre eso también. Sabes, me encanta llegar a los elementos de acción y decir, como aquellos de ustedes que sintonizan escuchando, leyendo esto viendo esto ahora mismo, ¿cuál es un elemento de acción que alguien puede hacer Jennifer ahora mismo hoy, para fomentar su bienestar durante este tiempo y para nosotros mismos para permanecer conectados en la comunidad.

Jennifer Wesselhoff
Sabes, para mí, lo que ha sido tan significativo es simplemente salir. Ya sea en la montaña o simplemente dando un paseo alrededor de la manzana, ha sido muy importante para mí el aire fresco. Aclara mi mente de una manera que no muchas otras cosas pueden hacer. Pero también una palabra amable. Creo que más que nada, no nos tomamos el tiempo suficiente para ser amables el uno con el otro. Y es algo con lo que estamos trabajando, con los visitantes y recordándoles cómo amar Park City, la forma en que AMAMOS Park City para mantenerlo sostenible en el futuro. La amabilidad tiene que ser increíble que hoy en día tenemos que recordarle a la gente que sea amable. Pero es que es así de simple. gesto, mostrando a la gente algo de amabilidad y cariño. Realmente realmente realmente va un largo camino.

Jessica Crate
Me encanta que salgamos hoy amigos, muestren un poco de amabilidad porque cuando lo dan, se vuelve diez veces mayor. Y me encanta eso, Jennifer y, por último, pero no menos importante, esta es una de nuestras preguntas favoritas. Si pudiera agitar su varita mágica, ¿qué le gustaría ver o crear en nuestra comunidad en el futuro?

Jennifer Wesselhoff
Armonía.

Jessica Crate
¡Asombrosa!

Jennifer Wesselhoff
Más armonía, mayor comprensión de que todos estamos haciendo lo mejor que podemos en todos los niveles, desde el dueño del negocio hasta la corporación, los empleados, las organizaciones sin fines de lucro y los residentes que saben que todos realmente tenemos el mejor interés. de Park City en el fondo, es posible que no estemos de acuerdo sobre cómo llegar allí. Pero tenemos la capacidad de tener conversaciones más profundas para ser respetuosos y crear una gran armonía por el bien de Park City y estoy muy emocionado de poder ser parte de eso.

Jessica Crate
Bueno, somos súper afortunados de tenerte como parte de esto. Y has sido parte de la cámara durante casi dos años. Entonces, ¿cuál ha sido tu mayor momento destacado, tu mayor momento de iluminación y cuál es tu cita o mantra que te gustaría dejar con nuestros espectadores hoy?

Jennifer Wesselhoff
Una de mis mayores sorpresas en los últimos 18 meses fue la cantidad de residentes que participaron en nuestra encuesta sobre el plan de turismo sostenible, casi 2700 personas participaron en esa encuesta. Y había algunas verdades duras en esa encuesta. De hecho, nos estamos preparando para desvelarlo. En el momento de este podcast, creo que la gente podrá ir a parkcitychamber.com/sustainabletourismplan y ver algunos de los resultados de esa encuesta. Porque esas serán nuestras marchas, nuestras órdenes de marcha sobre cómo avanzar, para ayudar a crear una Park City más sostenible. Creo que si tuviera un mantra más en este momento, es que juntos prosperamos. Y esa colaboración, esa asociación, y está sucediendo en tantos niveles en esta comunidad, los líderes comunitarios en el condado y los funcionarios electos en el condado en la ciudad, líderes comunitarios en organizaciones sin fines de lucro, todos trabajamos muy bien juntos. Y creo que si algo sale de este proceso de planificación para un plan de turismo sostenible, es este gran deseo de asociarse, colaborar y trabajar juntos para mejorar una Park City más sostenible. Y no podría estar más emocionado de estar en una comunidad que quiere eso y que está dispuesta a trabajar por ello. Y que esté dispuesto a trabajar juntos para que esto suceda.

Jessica Crate
Me encanta eso y somos esto. Es tan emocionante saber que estás detrás de escena realmente a la vanguardia y en las trincheras. Pero trabajando tan duro para continuar con esa atmósfera próspera, esa armonía y la comunidad avanzando en Park City. Nuevamente, muchas gracias, Jennifer, por estar aquí con nosotros hoy y apoyar este podcast. Y en nombre de nuestra directora ejecutiva, Mary Christa y mía. Nos gustaría agradecerles a todos por sintonizarnos. Gracias por acompañarnos todos y cada uno de los lunes en nuestros lunes de salud mental y video podcast Communities That Care Summit County. Puede encontrar un enlace a todos nuestros podcasts en nuestro blog en www.ctcsummitcounty.org y esperamos volver a escucharlo pronto. Por favor, dale me gusta, compártelo, suscríbete para recibir notificaciones en las redes sociales. Y si tiene a alguien de quien le gustaría saber o recomendar, estaremos encantados de saber de usted y continuar impulsando esta comunidad hacia adelante. Así que gracias de nuevo por estar en. Ten una maravillosa semana. Adiós por ahora. Gracias

Upcoming Events

Translate »