Transforming Communities Through Social Connectedness

May 4, 2022 | Coalition Strategy

The Healthy People 2030 Goal to “Increase Social and Community Support” is one of the most important, yet underappreciated influencers of health and wellness. Healthy communities are those where people receive the social support they need in the places where they live, work, learn and play.

Many community members face challenges and dangers they can’t control — unsafe neighborhoods, discrimination, or trouble affording the things they need. These challenges can have a negative impact on health and safety throughout life.

Positive relationships at home, at work and in the community can help reduce these negative impacts. Interventions to help people get the social and community support they need are critical for improving health and well-being.

Today our presentation will center around transforming communities through improved social and community context.

  • Moderator: Mary Christa Smith, CTC Executive Director
  • Panelists: Joey Thurgood, Nathan Malan, Cole Johnston and Hailee Hernandez
    • Joey Thurgood, Utah Department of Health
      • Bio: Joey Thurgood began her career in prevention 21 years ago at Prevent Child Abuse Utah. She has worked for the Utah Department of Health for 11 years, most recently as the Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) Prevention Specialist. Joey coordinates The Utah Coalition for Protecting Childhood (UCPC), a statewide, multidisciplinary coalition centered on ensuring safe, stable, nurturing relationships and environments for all Utah children. Joey is a lifelong Utahn, and mother of four.
    • Nathan Malan, Utah Department of Health
      • Bio: Nathan Malan has worked as an Epidemiologist/Evaluator for the Violence and Injury Prevention Program at the Utah Department of Health for the last two and a half years. His work primarily focuses on collecting and analyzing data to inform the work of UCPC and partners working on ACEs and injury prevention across the state. His educational background includes a Bachelor’s Degree in Emergency Services Management from Brigham Young University-Idaho and Master’s Degrees in Public Health from the University of Granada in Spain and Jagiellonian University in Poland.
    • Cole Johnston, Park City Recreation
      • Bio: Cole has worked full time for Park City Recreation for the past five years. As a Recreation Coordinator, Cole oversees a variety of adult and youth, sport and recreation programs. Cole holds a Bachelor’s Degree in Parks, Recreation and Tourism and a Minor in Human Development and Family Studies from the University of Utah. He is also a Certified Park and Recreation Professional (CPRP).
    • Hailee Hernandez, Christian Center of Park City
      • Bio: Hailee is the Programs Assistant and Volunteer Coordinator at the Christian Center of Park City (CCPC). Her primary job is data analysist understanding homeless and low income needs in Summit and Wasatch County. She scoordinate with multiple service providers in the counties to report to the state the needs in social services and gaps in services. Hailee is a Graduate student at Westminster College and will be graduating with a MA in Community Leadership with an emphasis in Trauma Resilience and Restorative Justice. Hailee’s thesis is focused on Latinas understanding of sex and sexual violence and has worked with the Rape Recovery Center as my community partner on my research. She is a recipient of the Global Leader Scholarship through the Utah Council of Citizen Diplomacy. Her bachelor’s degree is from USU was a BS in Family Consumer Human Development with an emphasis on Lifespan Development and a minor in Sociology.

From this discussion:

Mary Christa Smith  
Good. Morning, everyone, thank you for popping on right at 1030. We will get started with our webinar on the social determinants of Health and Transforming Communities through Social Connectedness. My name is Mary Christa Smith, and I am the Director for Communities That Care Summit County. And as the Youth Prevention Coalition of our Community, our efforts are to convene and provide a forum for organizations to work together in ways that promote healthy youth development. And I’m really delighted to be part of this panel today with some amazing speakers and to welcome you all to this webinar. Just a couple things to note, before we begin, you are welcome to put your questions in the Q&A. We will answer questions at the end of the webinar. And so after our four panelists have shared with you their, their PowerPoint and their information, we will make space at the end of the webinar to answer your questions. So feel free to type them in the Q&A anytime, and we will get to them. This webinar is being recorded and it will be available on our website if you would like to share it with others within your organization at a future point in time. So just to see who’s here today, if you would take some time and just put your name and perhaps an organization if you’re with one in the chat, we would love to welcome you all here. So take a moment and type your name in. We have close to 40 attendees today. So we’re really pleased to welcome you all here. I think you would all enjoy to see who else is watching this webinar with you. I would love to thank our partners who are key in helping us bring together this amazing panel, the Utah Department of Health Violence and Injury Prevention, Nathan Malan and Joey Thurgood, join us from the Utah Department of Health, so welcome to them. The Summit County Health Department is also a key partner for us in convening this webinar, along with Park City Recreation, and the Christian Center of Park City. So thank you to all these organizations for your willingness to collaborate, share information, and work together. I’ll just give you a quick overview of this particular webinar. And I’ll take a moment to introduce our panelists. And then they will each spend about 15 minutes sharing with you their work in the community. We’ve curated this panel so that we have a high level perspective from the state of Utah and also a very local Summit County perspective as well. So hopefully you will enjoy seeing this intersection between the state and the local level and the work that organizations are doing to foster health and well being.

The Healthy People 2030 goal to increase social and community support is one of the most important yet unappreciated influencers of health and wellness. Healthy Communities are those where people receive the social support they need. In the places where they live, work, learn and play. Many community members face challenges and dangers they can’t control, whether it be unsafe neighborhoods discrimination, or trouble affording the things they need, and these challenges can have a negative impact on health and safety throughout life. However, positive relationships at home and in the community can help reduce these negative impacts. interventions to help people get the social and community support they need are critical to improving health and well being. And today, our presentation will center around transforming communities through improved social and community context. We have four panelists joining us today. The first is Joey Thurgood from the Utah Department of Health. Joey began her career in prevention 21 years ago at the Prevent Child Abuse Utah organization and she has worked for at the Utah Department of Health for 11 years. yours, most recently as the Adverse Childhood Experiences prevention specialist, Joey coordinates the UTAH COALITION for protecting childhood, a statewide multidisciplinary coalition centered on ensuring safe, stable, nurturing relationships and environments. For all you taught children. Joey is a lifelong Utah and mother of four. We are also joined by Nathan Malan, also from the Utah Department of Health, and he has worked as an epidemiologist and evaluator for the Violence and Injury Prevention Program at the Utah Department of Health for the last two years. His work primarily focuses on collecting and analyzing data to inform the work of the UC PC and partners working on ACEs and injury prevention across the state. His education background includes a bachelor’s degree in Emergency Services Management from Brigham Young University, Idaho, and a Master’s Degree in Public Health from University of Granada in Spain. Cole Johnson from Park City recreation has worked full time for the past five years with the city. And as the recreation coordinator, Cole oversees a variety of youth and adult sport and recreation programs and he holds a bachelor’s degree in Parks Recreation and Tourism, and a minor in Human Development and Family Studies from the University of Utah. And last but not least, we are joined today by Hailee Hernandez from the Christian Center of Park City. Hailee is the program’s assistant and volunteer coordinator at the Christian Center of Park City and her primary job is in data land as a data analyst understanding homeless and low income needs in Summit and Wasatch County. She coordinates with multiple service providers in the counties to report to the state the needs and social services and gaps in services. And she is a graduate of Westminster College. So welcome to our panelists today. And I would like to turn the time over to begin our discussion to Nathan Malan. So Nathan.

Nathan Malan  
All right, thank you very much. Can you guys see my screen? All right. All right. So good morning. And thank you for the invitation to participate in this meeting. Today, I’m really excited to talk to you about such an important public health topic that is especially relevant with COVID that we’ve been dealing with and isolation and quarantine, I want to start by first recommending a book to you all, it does a much better job than I’m going to be able to do in the next 15 minutes of going over the research into connectedness and social isolation. And, and it’s just really a great read. It’s one of my favorite reads that I’ve had so far this year. So the book is together the healing power of human connection in a sometimes lonely world. And it’s by the 19, Surgeon General of the United States, Vivek Murthy. And yeah, I really recommend I’ve got a, an excerpt from it right here. That kind of introduces our topic a little bit. But what I’m going to be covering today is, like I said, the research, we’re gonna look at the negative effects of loneliness and social isolation, and the positive protective power of social connection. And then I’m going to introduce the Utah data a little bit that we have. And then Joey, my colleagues gonna jump in to talk about different efforts that are going on across the state. So this webinar series that you guys are doing is focused on the social determinants of health and moving upstream. And this is an elemental example of moving upstream. You have the public health impact pyramids here. And really addressing social connection. It’s the bottom of both of these pyramids, and the it’s a universal intervention strategy. And it’s also a socio economic factor that can have the largest impact. It can impact all sorts of different diseases and health across the lifespan. So it’s really important to be addressing it. And to clarify the importance of it, I want to point to a little bit of research that’s been done actually here in Utah by Professor Holt Lowenstein, who runs the social connection and Health Research Laboratory down at BYU. She’s recognized across the world for a couple of really great meta analyses that she did back in 2010, and 2012, which really highlighted the fact that loneliness is just about as big a risk factor as some of the main things that we think about like obesity, and smoking and poverty on our health. And so, one connection is the impact of loneliness is equivalent to smoking 15 cigarettes per day. And I don’t think that people understand or recognize that we we all Understand that smoking is bad for you. But do we understand that by not having a good socially connected life, that that’s also impacting our health to that extent? The 2015 article also came up with this, this statistic here that 29 There’s a 29% increase in the likelihood of early death overall, with loneliness. And why is that? So? How does it cause death man is by nature, a social animal, according to Aristotle, and the research definitely shows that as well. We evolved in groups, and we really need each other still, feeling socially isolated, activates neurobiological mechanisms that promote self preservation in the short term, but can take a toll on our health and well being and a long term loneliness and social disconnection, and have no negative effects on our hearts leading to heart disease and high blood pressure, it can impact our brains increasing risk of stroke, dementia, depression, anxiety and insomnia. It can impact our ability to fight illness, it can impact our decision making manifesting and impulse control issues and poor judgment. It can also have epigenetic impacts and how our genes are expressed in our bodies. So the bottom line is that social connection is a hugely unrecognized and recognized unrecognized and underappreciated force. That impacts us as individuals and impacts us as a product, community society. Substance abuse, relationships, suicide, all those things can be connected. In the book, loneliness, or, together a bifurcated workday, he does a really good job of introducing the the importance of different different levels of connection. Every single human needs each of these different levels of connections to feel whole, complete and healthy. Certainly, as individuals, we have different levels of each that we we need. But we need intimate connections, si gnificant other close confidant, we need those relational social circles, that people that accept us as we are, and that we connect with, I put these squiggly little lines because it’s our unique group of people that we find connection. And then we also need the broader community connection. And each of those is really important that we can have a great, we can be married and have a great relationship with our spouse and still feel lonely. And that’s because we need these other levels of connection as well. And so, we talked about the negative impacts of loneliness and social isolation. But let’s talk about the positive protective power. So the protective factor framework is, is a great starting place. It’s a very well researched and widely utilized framework for preventing and addressing child abuse and neglect. And there’s five protective factors and as you can see here, and number two is social connection. And so this framework has been shown to reduce child abuse and neglect, as well as a myriad of other Violence and Injury outcomes. Research also shows that these protective factors are promotive factors that can build family strength and family environment that promote optimal child development. Child and Youth Development. Also, if you’re not familiar with the Adverse Childhood Experiences research, I would recommend looking into that back in the 90s, there was a doctor in California who found that trauma in childhood could have effects on the health over the lifetime. And for 2030 years now that’s been going on. And there’s better evidence showing that the more trauma that adverse childhood experiences that a person has, the more likely they are to have adverse health impacts in the future and to die early. But in the last 10 years, there’s been some really great research that’s also come out that’s looking at positive childhood experiences. And so these specific things that can be in the lives of children that is protective against the negative long term impacts of adverse childhood experiences, so someone can have a high a score, adverse childhood experience, score, and still grow up and have a healthy life and not have those negative long term impacts on their health. And what are those positive childhood experiences? So you have a bunch of different names you have advantageous childhood experiences, counter aces, the Netherlands childhood experiences and a couple of different measures. One measure that we’re using here on our adult server that we do across the state is the positive childhood experiences. Seven, seven questions survey. And let’s read through these real quick because all of these have to do with connectedness. And so, as a child, I was able to talk with my family about my feelings felt that my family stood by me during difficult times, enjoyed participating community traditions, held a sense of belonging in high school felt supported by friends, at least two non parental adults to look who took a genuine interest in me felt safe and protected by my family, by an adult in the home. So the positive childhood experiences are centered around building healthy relationships and connectedness within the family, school and community environment. And really, so we want you to be resilient. And so what this research basically shows us is that resilience is facilitated by healthy connections. So if we want a child to be resilient, they need a good support system around them, and to feel like they have people that care about them are looking out for them. So looking at the Utah data, I’m gonna go over a couple of different surveys that we utilize highly in the state. And these are great surveys because we can break the data down to the local level. And so it can be really impactful in your work in Summit County. And so we have the BRFSS, which is the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance Survey System survey. And that’s done yearly. It’s for all adults 18. Plus, across the state, we get a representative sample, and ask about a myriad of different health outcomes and health behaviors. We do a similar survey with youth, every other year within the schools. It’s done with sixth to eighth, 10th and 12th graders, you can see the participation rates down in the bottom right corner for 2019 and 2021. And it’s a really great survey, all of your school districts will have specific data to their school district and things, which can be really helpful if you’re looking to address this topic. So before I arrived at the Utah Department of Health, someone was really smart. And they decided that they should add this social isolation scale to both of those surveys. And this scale included is as a nationally recognized scale. And N includes these four questions. In the past seven days, I have felt left out that people barely know me, isolated from others, that people around me, but not with me. My response options are never rarely, sometimes often always. And how we then analyze the status that we looked for the various social aid slated individuals who are going to be at the highest risk, who responded often or always to offer these questions. And when we did this analysis, what do you all think that we found? So these are we broke the age groups into 48 different age groups, for adult age groups, and then for different grades? In the chat, Would you guys mind putting a putting in which age groups you think were most likely to indicate that they were very socially isolated? So number eight, the older adults 65 Plus sixth graders, 10/10 graders, I’m guessing. All right, well, I won’t take too much time with this since I’m running low on time. But what we found this is this is perceived social isolation. And so this isn’t an objective measure. This is people, how they feel what they feel about being socially isolated. And what we found overwhelmingly is that the youth are much more likely to indicate that they’re very socially isolated, and especially our 10th graders, you can see is where things peak. And so 10.7% of youth respondents compared to 1.8% of adult response respondents were categorized is that very socially isolated in 2019. And then when we get our 2021 data into the, into the COVID pandemic, what do we see significant increases in all of our youth, our adult data for 2021 We don’t get back from the CDC till September. So I unfortunately don’t have that. But I imagine that we’ll probably see some increases in adults as well. But this is really concerning. The research shows there’s a longitudinal study that was done, I believe in Scotland was this one looked at kids that identified as socially isolated as youth and followed them into adulthood. And what they found is that social isolation has persistent and cumulative detrimental effects on adult health. And so this is something that we really need to address. Um, I think as we discussed this social isolation scale, it’s helpful to understand what is included in that designation. So again, we have those four questions in here you see that both in youth and adults, they’re most likely to indicate that in the past seven days, I have felt that people are around me, but not with me. And also within the Summit County data. This is from the Summit County report that was produced. Joey actually, can you throw this in the chat? I’ll give you a link to this report.

Joey Thurgood  
Was that not the one that you just that you gave me already? The sharp I put that in?

Nathan Malan  
Oh, put it in the chat.

Joey Thurgood  
Yep.

Nathan Malan
But yeah, so this is this is the social isolation responses for Summit County. The, you can see here. So you have six 810 12th graders, and then an overall, the black dots are the state average. And then the blue is the 2021 responses. And so you see that, as well in some of the county felt that people around me, but not with me, was the highest response. Also just highlight quickly here is that eighth graders, across the four questions in Summit County were more likely than the state average, to indicate that they felt those felt socially isolated with those different questions. So what was I going to talk about here? So yeah, but as we’re addressing social isolation, I think what we need to take away here is that maybe an important starting point, is addressing barriers to people expressing their authentic selves to those around them. And this also helps us understand better the most at risk groups that I’m going to talk about now. And so with further analysis, we broke things down by different demographics. And what we found is that we had higher prevalence of very socialite of those very social isolated, individuals in our LGBTQ youth are trans youth, were 46% versus non trans youth, which are at 15% 16%, bisexual youth 42%. Compared to 13%, gay and lesbian 37% 13% of youth who did not have family meals together, you can see that there’s a big, just big disparity between families that are just having meals together and how the youth are identifying as very socially isolated, non LDS youth as the predominant culture in the state, we see that those who are non LDS 22% versus 11%. And then youth females are 20%, compared to 9% of males, and non white youth 18% Compared to 14%, of white youth. So some, some things to consider, and some is some were some, some groups that are specifically at higher risk to indicating to identifying as very socially isolated. Also, if you look at the adult data, we see that our caregivers, and single parents have higher rates of social isolation. And so I think that that’s important as we’re trying to address the two generations, and seeing how things are being modeled by families, important that we’re addressing parents, parents connection, so that they can be good examples to their youth of how to be to live connected and healthy lives. I’m running low on time, so I won’t go too much into this. But basically, I talked about those three different levels of connection that are necessary. And with youth, it might be a little bit different than with adults. But there’s all these different factors. Technology is a very important one. In this time, where youth are connected via technology a lot it’s important that we understand the importance of maybe allowing that connection at times even as we’re trying to address over utilization of social media and everything, making sure that we’re allowing our youth to have connection and find real connection beyond just looking at pictures and liking them and things. Um, so within the prevention needs assessment or the the sharps the Youth Survey, they have some really great risk and protective profiles that they make, which there’s there’s hundreds of questions that they asked these youth. Things from how connected are you to, to your mother to your father? Do you feel like you’re able to talk about feeling sad or hopeless, or any of those things. And so those are all connected here you can see, they haven’t broken out in different categories community, family, school, and peer individual. And there’s a myriad there’s there’s so much data that’s available there to better understand where youth are feeling disconnected. If it’s an on the community level, if it’s on the family level, and if so, within the family level, how can we address that? Is that their relationships with their mothers? Do they feel like they’re getting the opportunities to connect with their parents in the way that they like? Are they having family meals together? And so yeah, I really hope that you’ll work with your school districts and work with the, the, the excuse me, the reports that have been created to get this data out to each of the different communities across the state because it’s really, really powerful data that can be used in in really good ways. And so I’m going to turn the time over to Joey, to talk more about this, but about what’s going on around across the state. But if you have any questions or you’d like any data, I’m also very willing to to pull data or get you connected with somebody who gets you the right data for your work in Summit County. So thank you for your time. And Joey, do want to take the take over?

Joey Thurgood  
Oh, hear I had already taken over and had gone into my spiel and didn’t realize I was still muted. Hello, everybody. My name is Joey Thurgood. I am the Adverse Childhood Experiences prevention specialists from the Utah Department of Health. And my job is to coordinate the UTAH COALITION for protecting childhood. The UTAH COALITION for protecting childhood is a multidisciplinary, really, I said that funny is a statewide multidisciplinary coalition focused on upstream primary prevention approaches to ensure safe, stable, nurturing relationships, and environments for all Utah children. The effort is funded through the CDC Essentials for Childhood grants. And just to give you a little bit of a little bit more understanding of what we mean by primary prevention. If you look at this little green box, it’s not very easy to read because it’s green on green and I promise I didn’t design that. Primary prevention requires a shift from a focus on programs to a focus on more far reaching prevention initiatives and a focus from the individual to a focus on the environment. We do this by focusing on root causes or risk and protective factors as Nathan mentioned earlier, if he IPP has identified connectedness as a super factor for prevention, meaning that it underlines almost everything, it is one of the most influential and as he mentioned before, one of those that is most easily overlooked. It prevents a myriad of poor Violence and Injury outcomes, including suicide, substance use disorder, child maltreatment and domestic violence. Next slide, Nathan. So just I don’t know how many of you are aware of it this month is family strengthening month. Any ideas what this month’s designation used to be? Put in the chat? This is signified by beautiful blue pinwheels? What did we celebrate in April? Or? Or did we recognize in April that involved a blue pinwheels? Exactly Child Abuse Prevention Month. So because we have changed this which this and we even have a declaration from the Governor, I had to cut off his seal, because it was because the PDF wouldn’t fit. That’s next to it is the front page of The Family Strengthening much month Toolkit, which I will pop into the chat right now for you to look through. And I recognize that the month is half over. But there’s still really good information in here. And the reason why I bring it up is because it’s super important to helping folks understand why the shift, why we’re shifting away from child abuse prevention to to this other focus. We’re only one of a couple of states that have made this change. And the reason why is because and I’ll have Nathan flip to the next stage. Or excuse me the next slide. The theme is building a better tomorrow for all children together. The reason why we shift away from Child Abuse Prevention Month to family strengthening month is because we’re focusing on those upstream approaches that are applicable to everybody. When we say Child Abuse Prevention Month, who is our focus audience? Who are we talking to? We’re talking to them, right? Those families that have that problem, we’re not talking about my problem or my neighbor, or my sisters problem. Because we believe in our heads that child abuse happens to other kinds of people, it doesn’t happen to us. So this focus is on focuses, focuses, oh, my goodness, I can’t talk focuses us on upstream approaches that are applicable to everyone. It’s focused on preserving and strengthening the family and every family benefits from a strong family setting. It promotes the protective factors. It promotes family connectedness, it encouraged us to community, our community involvement by recognizing that it takes a village that all of us have a role to play in strengthening families, because when we strengthen families, we strengthen communities, and it shifts the conversation away from others, be others. To us, it’s on all of us to make sure that children raise up in strong, healthy, nurturing relationships and environments. And so this is kind of these are kind of the cute little things that you can find on Prevent Child Abuse, or prevent child abuse America’s website, children are locally grown, our work is rooted in science. It really is an intention to move us towards more inclusive language and messaging that that will hit everyone. But one of the biggest problems with connectedness, and one of the biggest barriers is help seeking. One of the most important and powerful benefits of having strong social connections is the impact it has on help seeking. There are times every adult needs extra help. Please know there is no shame in seeking help when you need it for parenting concerns for mental health are concrete supports such as child care, food, rent, transportation. Try to accept help when someone offers it to you and think of ways that you can help others in need. calling a friend or speaking to a trusted person in your life can help you cope during difficult times. And it gives you the chance to connect and share and learn from others. By asking for help, you are modeling healthy coping behaviors for your child, you’re not showing your child that they’re weak. If they if they don’t ask for help. You’re showing your child how to cope in a healthy way by asking for help. So click one more time anything. So here’s the big question, folks. Why is it so dang hard to ask for help? So in the chat, please put a couple of reasons that you can think of that might be barriers to help seeking. Just anything you can think of typing in the chat. Why might someone not ask for help? They’re a burden. They’re embarrassed, they’re there. They’re ashamed, though others will find out their pride very good. They don’t want others to know. So there’s a stigma right there shame associated with it. It threatens their sense of identity. That’s true. These are all good examples of why people might not ask for help. Well, one of the big parts of connectedness is not just connecting people in a warm fuzzy way spiritually and emotionally to others like Nathan was talking mainly about those connections to groups connections to others who are like minded but we also need to connect to the people we serve to actual resources that’s connectedness to so as part of family strengthening month our CB cap coordinator Tricia Reynolds CB cap stands for brace yourself. Community based Child Abuse Prevention Coordinator. That’s a really big title too. But as part of the launch of the family strengthening month, she partnered with United Way’s 211 to create a parenting resources page on the two on one website. So there you’ll see in blue over here to the side, that’s the that’s the menu on United Way’s 211. You’ll see here at the bottom of the page that I’ve added that the URL to get you there. But the second tab on their on their page is Parent Resources. And when you click on that, if you go over here to the right side of the page, you’re going to see five areas broken out by the protective factors that Nathan just explained to you parental resilience, social connections, parenting and child development, concrete support and social emotional competence. Do you need help with childcare services, click on concrete supports not only will you find options for child care, but you’ll also see links to help with money management and even legal services. Each section will take you directly to links associated with the many topics bulleted in the middle of the slide. So see those all of those things listed out in the center of the slide.

Those are just a sampling of the things the different resources that you can be connected to through this amazing resource that 211 put together in conjunction with you The Department of Human Services. And then finally, and I know this month is almost over. But if you have little ones, elementary age, preschool age, another part of family strengthening month was The Goose Chase app. And that use case the goose Goseck. Gosh, I can’t talk to the the goose chase app was put together by my discovery destination. It’s basically a what the scavenger hunt. And what it does is encourages families to spend quality time together, it helps teach them about prevention things. And it helps with some personal development within the family. And it’s been very well received. And so if you’re interested, you can go and download it on either of the apps, any of the app stores, it might be under my my discovery destination, it might be under boost Chase app, but it’s a pretty fun one. Okay, next slide. So what we know Nathan, you’re gonna have to click through these one at a time. We know that connectedness makes us healthier. It makes us more productive. It makes us more creative. Resilience. It makes us more fulfilled, and it makes us more whole. And as Jane Howard said, call it a clan called a network called a tribe. Call it a family, whatever you want to call it, whoever you are, you need one, you need one because you’re human. Now there are lots of definitions for connectedness that can be given. And the boring one that you get from CDC is connectedness refers to a sense of being cared for supported and belonging, and can be centered on feeling connected to school work, family or other important people in organization in a person’s life. Poori I like Brene browns, her definition. And you’ll notice that I’ve highlighted certain words that I want you to think about as I read this. connectedness is the energy that exists between people when they feel seen, heard and valued, when they can give and receive without judgment. And when they derive sustenance and strength from the relationship that is connectedness. So finally, last thoughts from Vivek Murthy from together and please Nathan and I both highly recommend that you read this book is fantastic. But this is directly from his book. And I want to I kind of want to finish off with this. Creating a connected life begins with the decisions we make in our day to day lives. Do we choose to make time for people? Do we show up as our true selves? Do we seek out others with kindness, recognizing the power of service to bring us together? This work isn’t always easy. It requires courage, the courage to be vulnerable, to take a chance on others to believe in ourselves. But as we build connected lives, we make it possible to build a connected world. Thank you so much, you guys. We appreciate having the opportunity to spend this time with you. We will be sticking around to the end. So if you have any questions for us, if there’s anything that we can do to support you in your local efforts, we’re here for you. Thank you so much.

Mary Christa Smith  
Thank you, Joey. I really appreciate your thoughtful sharing of the power of connectedness and how it manifests in our communities and some ideas of what we can do individually and through our organizations to foster that sense of community connectedness as a super factor for protection. So thank you, thank you. Thank you. I’m really delighted to introduce you all to Cole Johnston, who works at Park City recreation and is going to share with us some of our local resources when it comes to fostering community connectedness. And I’d love for all of you who are on the call today. I see so many of you from various organizations in our community to think about ways in which you can embed these practices within your own organization because it can’t just be Park City recreation or the Christian Center. It really takes all of us thoughtfully and intentionally embedding these practices that foster connections so cool. Thank you so much. Take it away.

Cole Johnston  
Thank you, Mary Christa. I am going to share my screen here. And hopefully this goes through. Everyone see my screen right now.

Mary Christa Smith  
Cole we can see your screen but it’s showing all of it and yep, that’s it. That’s

Cole Johnston  
All right. Cool. I will get situated here. Well, thank you, everybody. Mine name is Cole Johnston. I am a recreation coordinator here with Park City Recreation, Park City Municipal and the PC MARC. And I have been involved with Communities That Care for quite a few years now and have tried to attend as many meetings as possible and been really beneficial for me to attend those meetings and really look at, you know, the community as a whole. And you know, what, us here at parks and recreation can do or, you know, do more of to sort of cultivate this community connectedness, through recreation. So with that being said, I’ll kind of go ahead and get started. So just a little bit of brief history, Park City. So our mission statement is enriching the lives in our community through exceptional people, programs and facilities. Now we put people programs and facilities in that order, because people are our number one. Our number one focus, we hire good people, we build good people around our team, whether that’s full time staff, whether that’s tennis instructors, whether that’s lifeguards, we hire exceptional people, because without those people, our programs or our facilities don’t really matter. With that, Park City, recreation runs and operates the PC MARC, which is a recreation center here in town located in park Meadows. And we also operate Park City tennis and as well as Park City, parks, so city park, wherever you park and the new Park City Heights Park and then a variety of adult youth sport, fitness and wellness programs. And the reason I say that is because a lot of people when they think recreation will they think just youth soccer or they think you know, adult sports or fitness. We are a we’re really a community organization focused, yes, on recreation, but also on community wellness, community connectedness. And then I just have a quote here, there is no greater community investment than an investment in recreation. Now, I just want you to look at this slide and just notice how many times I either said community or community is listed on this. On this slide, community comes up a lot in recreation, it’s in our mission statement. It’s in our description. And it’s in a lot of quotes centered around recreation, we are here for the community, and we’re here to create that community connectedness come on there we go. Okay, sorry about that. Technical difficulty. So I’m just gonna start with the PC MARC. So those of you guys that aren’t familiar with it. The Park City MARC is short or is the short for Park City Municipal Athletic and Recreation Center. We used to be the old Racquet Club back in I think I want to say the city bought the old rec club in the late 70s. And it was the Racquet Club until about 2010. When this when it was completely torn down and rebuilt into what it is today the PC MARC. Really with the MARC. A lot of people think it’s a recreation center people can come here to attend a fitness class or they can get a workout in or they can play tennis or pickleball or basketball. But really what we strive here is to go beyond that we have if you walk in, we have a really grand lobby with a lot of comfortable comfortable couches and tables. We have a couch downstairs with a workspace we’ve got a community gathering room. Because we want to be more than a recreation center, we want to be a community center, we want to be a place where people can come and gather we want to be a place where people can meet with maybe a dietician or a meet with a personal trainer. People can come here to work on group projects. People can come here to hold meetings. So really we want to be that place that people can come to, you can gather at and be on a recreation center we want to be that place that the community can come we’re also very find ourselves very diverse. We have a lot of different diversity here. Old, older people, younger people. And it’s a place that works it’s a place that a lot of different place. People can come different ages and yeah. Additionally, we’ve got basically you know, we try to put on again, more than just the basic traditional sports of recreation you know, we hold community crafts, we hold community events, such as our flashlight candy cane hunt. During the holidays, we’ve done Easter egg hunts in the past. We will do different things, you know, to try to engage the community beyond typical sports If that makes sense. So again, the common theme is just sort of bringing people together. I wanted to talk about a specific program that we do. It’s called free student Mondays, the history behind this program, back in 2016, we had a tragic unfortunate passing of to teens, due to drugs. And with that the city really reached out to specifically us here in recreation, the library, the ice arena, to say, you know, what can we do to engage the community? What can we do to engage these kids specifically, on, you know, providing safe spaces providing activities for them to do, you know, providing maybe a distraction, you know, per se, for for these kids. And we originally sat down, and we said, okay, what can we do? And we said, let’s put on a basketball program for them, let’s put on a ping pong tournament for them, let’s, let’s put on all these activities and events. And we did that. And we had very, very little participation. And then we sat down again, and we decided, well, let’s go back to the drawing board, let’s actually reach out to the kids and decide what they want. And so we actually got permission from some of the schools in the school district to go out and find, you know, just basically survey the kids, we asked them during, during their lunch hour to say, hey, what if we did something? What would you want to see? What would you want us to, you know, to do for you. And they said, We just want a place to come and hang out. You know, they said very simply, you know, we are over programmed, we have, you know, our parents are running us every direction to this program, to that program to this music lesson to this practice. And they said, We just want a place to come and hang out and really do what they want. And we said, Okay, that sounds great. So at the time, and I believe it’s still the case, but Park City school district gets early, gets out early on Mondays. And our location here in Park Meadows is within walking access to from McAllen, Treasure Mountain, as well as the high school. And it’s also all three of those schools are on the bus line, to come here. So he said, Okay, every Monday when you get out of school, really, any student with a student ID is welcome to come in for free. And we basically did nothing but provide them the space to be kids, though, some will come in and use the basketball gym workout, we’ve provided the space for kids to do homework. And really, that’s sort of what what it continues to be today, it’s a place where kids can come and be safe, but be unsupervised. Sometimes, we’ve had a couple of issues come up where, you know, we’ve had a lot of students come in at once, and they may monopolize the fitness floor, or completely kind of take up a basketball gym. And we’ve gotten a couple complaints. And, you know, we will deal with those complaints on a on a case by case basis. But really the the center theme is we’d rather have them here than somewhere else doing something where they probably should you know what they shouldn’t be doing or unsupervised. Here at the mark, they can come here and feel like they’re alone when you know they’re actually are in a safe space. So kind of a cool thing that we’re doing. And then Mary Krista and I have actually started working with we started working together and community stickers actually providing pizza about once a month for the students to come in for free. So now are not only are we giving them free space to come and do what they please and that safe space, but they’re getting pizza as well. And it’s been very popular. So shout out to America.

All right. Here’s one other thing too, that we’re you know, just again, trying to bring that community together. We have in August 2021, we implemented our Sliding Fee Scale program. This replaced our previous fee reduction program. Again, trying to equitably serve all of the members in the community basically did the discount applies to pretty much everything but a private lesson. So you can use this discount for a fitness membership. You can use this discount for swim lessons, karate lessons, as long as it’s not a private one on one. But any of our programming or fitness passes you could use this membership for basically it works and it is available to all Park City residents within the school district. And basically works on a scale based based on household income and size. So basically, essentially what it does is you submit the application, submit your annual household income, and then you can essentially qualify for anywhere between a 30 or 70% discount on programs and passes. Again, depending on what your household income may be. And the reason we do this is we don’t want to exclude anyone. We want to make sure that there are as little barriers of entry to possible to recreation. So again, giving everyone that the same access to these to us as people to our programs into our facilities as we can. We want to make sure that we do not exclude anyone You know, we want to make sure that we serve the community as a whole and equitably. All right, so, sort of this big picture. Now I want to try to talk just a little bit about sort of what recreation means to me and what I see sort of in this big picture process, so I don’t want you guys don’t have to if you want to just throw some things in the chat, but look at these photos and just kind of tell me what you see. Or you can just throw it in the chat. You can put one word answers down. You know, whatever it may be, but couple things just you know, to notice, right? Got a little girl playing soccer really cute. Looks like we’ve got some sort of swim swim event happening. Something’s going on here at the skate park, maybe some kids teaching some younger kids. And then we’ve got a really great photo of playground. Playground spiderweb with we’ve got one of our camp counselors in the camper, they’re sitting on top of top of that playground piece. Belly flop about to happen, but really togetherness. Yeah, Luis, that’s pretty much exactly what I’m going for. Mary Christa joy and exploration. Yeah. So really, if you kind of want to dig into this, I’m just going to start here at the soccer picture. But I don’t know if anyone has ever had kids in our soccer program or has has done that. But that’s really every Saturday in the spring or fall, when we’ve got spring youth soccer or fall youth soccer going on. That is a place of community connectedness. It is a place where we have volunteer coaches, we have volunteer referees. We have families coming together to watch their kids participate in, we call it you know, the group of kids, I’ll chase the ball, because it’s really not soccer. It’s just a bunch of five or six kids, six year olds chasing a soccer ball around the field. But it’s a joy, right? It’s togetherness. We talk a lot about basically how, you know when you’re a parent of someone this age. Most of your friends are parents with kids the same age. So that becomes social time for mom and dad as well, at the field watching their kids play soccer. So again, everything to community connectedness. That picture with all those kids skate skateboarding, we run some some skateboard camps and clinics. And really what’s so great about this program is with our skatepark, we want to make it a safe, a safe space, just like we have here at the mark. Unlike soccer, or the swimming pool, you know, some parents are maybe fearful to drop their kids off at the skate park by themselves. You know, they know soccer camp and they know the soccer field. They’re not so sure about the skate park. With the skate park programs, we want to be able to sort of ixnay that skate park stereotype, you might say and say you know what I do feel comfortable dropping my kid off at the skate park. The people there are excellent. There are people that are really nice. And I know my kids going to be safe there. So with our skateboard camps and clinics, again, trying to bring that include that skatepark, that space as that community community connectedness.

And then finally with the our camp counselor in our camper there at the top, I just kind of wanted to chat a little bit go into detail on, you know, our staff, again, kind of circling back to the people in our mission statement. And really what we are and what we do. There’s about 12 of us full time here at the MARC that are in recreation. And the 12 of us hire about 250 seasonal staff in the summertime. So everything from camp counselors to lifeguards to support instructors, to referees, all that stuff. And really what we preach to our staff is it’s not just a summer job. It’s not just a lifeguard gig. It’s not just a you know, first job for a lot of the kids we hire, it’s their first job. And it’s more than that. It’s a lot more than that. So basically what we talk about is we’re more than camp counselors. We’re more than referees. We have a hold on a lot of the kids, we make an imprint on them. We are mentors. And we can, Nathan talked a lot about that positive childhood experience we can make or break that experience. We sort of a lot of times by the end of the summer, many of the kids that we work with look up to us. So we’re those mentors were those trusted adults. And we leave hopefully, you know, whether it’s just for the summer or whether it’s for 30 years, we leave, you know, understanding the impact that we have on a child’s life. You know, we leave trained in CPR and first aid we treat we are trained in QPR again, Mary Christa and Suffolk County health work with us to train our staff there. And we’re trained in Youth protection so to keep an eye out for what we see or what we can potentially see you know that that we might need this to say something about train to just look out for those type of things. So again, looking back, you know, the the kids that we hire the staff that we hire, all making, hopefully making our community a better place, a better place and a safer place. My story really quick, I’ll just kind of conclude with this is, I was born and raised here in Park City, and got a job at our summer day camp as a counselor in high school, I think it was 14 or 15 years old. And at the time, you know, I just said, Oh, it’s a summer job. It’s a, it’s a fun job I can do during the summertime and I get to play with kids all day. And it sounds really great. And sort of the more I started coming back every summer, I said, Oh, my gosh, I think I might probably do this as a career, I said, Why not, it’d be pretty cool, I get to work where other people play, I get to have an impact on the community, I get to have an impact on these kids. And, you know, lo and behold, here I am, quite a few years later, now working full time for the job that I started. For the same organization that I’ve been working for now, my basically my whole life. So kind of cool. And then really Same thing goes with some of our other staff too, we all started in a part time, Kid influential role. So most of us started in summer day camp, where, you know, we’ve sort of just climbed the ladder per se to get to where we are. But really, again, bigger picture when recreation when a lot of people see recreation, they see, you know, next sports program, or they see the place where they go to work out, or where they go to play noon drop and basketball or tennis. But really, we try to strive to go beyond just that first layer that you know judging a book by its cover. And we try to be more than more than that we try to be ingrained in the community engaged in the community. And we strive for that community connectedness. So thank you guys very much, Mary. Christa, thank you for the time and the opportunity. I as well will stick around for any questions or thoughts that that come up.

Mary Christa Smith  
My gosh, thank you so much, Cole, you and I have talked many times. And I’ve learned a lot from you over the years that you’ve been involved with Communities That Care. But I learned so much more today about just the intentionality of what you are doing within Park City Recreation to foster community connectedness and that it runs underneath and through all of your programming your initiatives, how you train your staff, I love seeing that you’re training your staff and how to be mentors and how to look out for kids and notice if something needs addressing. So we’re so fortunate to have your leadership at the mark. And in our community. Thank you. I want to turn the time over now to Hailee Hernandez from the Christian Center to talk about their work and especially volunteerism and the work through the Christian Center that also fosters community connectedness. So Hailee, take it away.

Hailee Hernandez  
Thank you very much. Let me go ahead and share my slide. All right. Thank you guys, for joining me today. I am the interim volunteer and Programs Coordinator, as well as the basic needs assistance Data Coordinator for the Christian Center of Park City. So I’m gonna first talk a little bit about volunteerism. So volunteerism has been a huge sector in America for a long standing time. We all know that. But when COVID hit, it had been immense impact on the nonprofit sector. After COVID hit, we went down to about only having one in five and one in three women that were volunteers. And this is a decrease in participation. I can’t recall exactly what it was, but it’s a decrease and the likelihood of women being more part of the community and volunteering is also a common trend. But then we also had research done on what the impact is of volunteers. So one volunteer hour is worth $28.54. Now if you think about the education level, the passion, the everything that these volunteers are coming in with, this is what that pay equates to. You know, they’re not just sorting things, but they’re doing it with intention. There’s a reason why they’re coming here. And, and it does equate to that. Another thing that came about is that more people were were at home and had the availability to volunteer in different ways. So that made me Being able to tutor online through COVID, instead of doing it in person, or offering classes, workshops online that were not previously commonly done online, that’s another form of volunteerism that we explored. And then lastly, volunteerism isn’t just a specific event that you sign up for, or that you have to do with a group can be something as small as going to shovel your neighbor’s snow from their yard or getting them groceries, checking on them, making sure their pantry stocked up, or what have it may be somebody has COVID, you know, making sure they have everything that needs, somebody goes out of town, making sure their home is taken care of just being a part of the community. And then one thing that’s really beneficial with volunteerism is that it helps these volunteers hone in on their specific skills. So within the Christian Center, one thing that I tried to do is, you know, we don’t have a job that meets what the volunteers looking to do, let’s bank on what what skills and attributes they do have that they’re willing to volunteer. So if we have a recent graduate, that did marketing work, and they want to volunteer this, but they don’t have the time to come into the center to do physical labor. Let’s have them, you know, make some pamphlets for us. Let’s do some marketing connections with them. Let’s see how we can best utilize their service and their skills.

So at the Christian Center, we have two centers. We have one in Park City that serves Summit County. Then we also have the Heber center that serves Wasatch County. So each center has a thrift and a boutique store as well as a food pantry. A really great thing about thrift and boutique stores is that they provide 40% of funding for our programs. So our programs are a lot of the behind the scenes word but a lot of the community does not see are one of the programs that we do is our basic needs assistance program. So basic needs assistance is case management for low income individuals or individuals that are experiencing homelessness. There are some gaps in social services within summit and Wasatch County. And our basic needs assistance team tries their best to meet those needs, with funding to provide services for them. So an example of gaps in services. An individual was working as a snow maker for this season, and he was provided housing with his job. He was injured and no longer to be able to contribute the amount of work that he needed to with his injury, which also resulted in him losing his job and his housing. Our basic needs assistance team was able to get him a hotel. And then they did some case management work with him talking through what connections he does have within the community and within his family and his friends and his networks. And he had a connection with a case manager at the VOA. So we spoke to his case manager at the VOA and he was able to lend him a vehicle because he had no vehicle. And then we were also able to get him in contact with his family and purchase a bus ticket. So he was able to spend the holidays with his family. So a lot of that was paid for through funds that came through our thrift store in our boutique. So when you’re going to Arthur sturdy boutique, you’re doing a whole lot more for the community that you may not even be aware when you’re purchasing items are volunteer opportunities within the Christian Center. So we have our boutique and thrift store where we have our volunteers go through sort clothes, help participant or help shoppers come through and find what they’re looking for. One really big thing that our thrifted teak stores are commonly known for is our snowboarding gear and our ski here. So we have a lot of people come and donate their gear after the season. And people love to come and find a great deal on some lightly used equipment. And so we have some ski and avid snowboard lovers that come and love to volunteer and talk to people about the gear that they’re buying. Help them through it. You know, for me, I wasn’t very well known. I didn’t know boards, I didn’t know skis and didn’t really know a lot about bindings. And when I went in there to have a volunteer helped me he was amazing and helping me not only just finding the proper gear, but what trails to go to the next day and where was the best place to go for me as New beginner. So not only was he volunteering his time, but he was he was being able to talk about something that he’s passionate about snowboarding, and being out in the mountain and connecting with people in the community. Our food pantry serves all summit and Wasatch County, we work together with local, local grocery stores, to do grocery rescue. And with our grocery rescue, we also have some opportunities for our community members to go and pick up food for us. So if a volunteer is unable to meet our pantry stocking times, and we go out and restock all the shelves, and they want to have more of a regular schedule and volunteering with us, but can’t commit to the times that we have, we can work with them to be a partner in our grocery rescue. So that would entail the volunteer, taking their vehicle to the grocery store, meeting with the store manager, picking up the groceries and then delivering to delivering them to our pantry to have further volunteers sort and shelve the produce and the other groceries.

Those that type of volunteerism gets you in deep contact within the community, you’re working with everybody that comes through the door, greeting them, making sure they have what they need. And just letting them know about other services, like our basic needs assistance program, you know, if if somebody is is coming in for groceries, they may not also be able to pay for, you know, their heating bill, their water bill, and we can assist them with those type of needs. You know, it’s it’s that lending hand and knowing that it’s not just Christian Center, employees, but also volunteers, people within your community that care about you. And they want to make sure that your needs are being met. Another way that we focus on meeting people at their point of need, which is our mission statement, is doing mobile food pantries. So with our mobile food pantries, we have volunteers to help load up our trailer with produce and other necessary items for people in the community. And then we have a different set of volunteers that will drive their vehicles to the sites that we’re at, meet us there and help set up the pantry where people are. So this means going to affordable housing apartments or maybe rural areas and the community that may not have the best public transportation to get to our food pantries, meeting them there and making sure that their needs are being taken care of and their families have the food to eat that night. We did this last week. And we had 43 families come through our Mobile Food Pantry and we were able to make sure that they had some great meals on the table that night. Another volunteer opportunity we have is facility cleanup, and facility cleanup contributes to not only making sure our facility is clean and looks nice, but a sense of community and making sure that you’re making sure the general areas within our community look nice and are taking care of any have some pride in that, you know. And then our last volunteer opportunity is our go shoot reservation outreach. So we work with the go shoot tribe, to make sure that their needs are met. And that includes bringing food from our pantries that they may not be able to get easily on the reservation. Additionally, we believe twice a year we do big service projects with them. So right now, one of their needs on the reservation is cleaning up some scrap metal piles. And so we’re going to be working together to get different volunteers in our community to work together to go and clean up the scrap metal pile. This is meeting people at their point of need and diversifying the people that we’re meeting with. So we’re not only meeting with people in Park City in southern Wasatch County, but the people that have were once indigenous to this land, people that are continuing to pray for water or their ancestors came to this land, we have to acknowledge them and work with them and make sure that their needs are also being met. So that’s one of our main goals within CCPC volunteer work and how volunteerism connects to social and community context objectives.

So when you are meeting with people that you may not regularly see, if you’re working in your office, you’re making those friendships, those connections and for me, coming from a Mexican American and low income background. I never really felt that I was welcomed in a lot of spheres. And it’s also very intimidating to talk to people outside of your social circles. So So coming to a food pantry and having that accessibility to talk to people in different spheres and different communities that you may not regularly meet with, it gives you a broader sense of community and it actually makes you feel that they they care, they want to know how you are, you know, when you come in every day, or once a week to the food pantry to get your family needs, you know, they they begin to know who your family are, they begin to see who your daughters are, say hi to them ask how was that soccer game this weekend. And it just builds that sense of community that that wasn’t there originally due to maybe boundary lines or just general social context that you may not have contact with those individuals within our volunteer opportunities to be able to have opportunities in volunteerism for youth and children. So about two weeks ago, we had our massive easter egg project where we it entailed creating 1500 Easter baskets for both communities in Summit and Wasatch County. So we had, I believe it was 60 volunteers up in our gathering space. And that included ages four to 70. Which is very rare to get in a room, especially with that many people but we were able to do it. We had pizza, we had music, we had laughs We had prayers. It was something that doesn’t happen regularly. And it’s it’s celebrating the season with people that you usually don’t. And it really helped the kids see how they how they can connect with other people in the community to benefit everybody. Lastly, within our food pantry, we have recently moved to reorganizing it to have produce as main forefront. And we are working with some doctors in the area to promote more healthy lifestyles and better access to ways to cook meals in a affordable way that are also nutritious. So we also are working with the police department in Park City to have coffee with a cop. So officer Franco comes once a month to meet with our community because what a lot of the police department has noticed is that they’re responding to calls that don’t necessarily need to be responded to, and they probably could have been mitigated earlier with some education. So with Officer Franco coming to our food pantry to meet our clientele, we are offering that education piece you know that comfortability piece and being able to answer questions that they may not regularly feel comfortable asking because he’s in a space that he’s meeting them where they are. And we do ask him when he does come to please dress down so it’s not as intimidating or traumatizing. For some people in our community. Police can have a negative connotation. But we are trying to bridge that gap and ensure that everybody in the community is working together to help each other. And that’s what we’re all here for. Right. So that is my presentation, I’m going to close with a quote from Dorothy Height. Without community service, we would not have a strong quality of life, it is important that the person who serves as well as a recipient, it’s the way in which we ourselves grow and develop. Thank you.

Mary Christa Smith  
Hailee, thank you so much for sharing the work that is happening at the Christian Center. And welcome to your interim role. And thank you for all that you do for our community and telling not only the story of the Christian Center, but your own personal story as well. I appreciate it. So, folks, we have about 15 minutes left, and we have our panelists here, Nathan Cole, Hailee and Joey, who are here and available to take questions from you. And so feel free to either pop them in the chat or put them in the Q&A. I did see one question come through earlier our panelists don’t really have access to typing in questions. So it came from Joey Thurgood about recreation opportunities in Eastern Summit County, the more rural parts and I’m wondering Cole, do you have information about what might be available in Colville and Kamus?

Cole Johnston  
Yes, I can try my best my I do. So, there’s South Summit a South Summit has a small recreation department in Kamus they work with closely with the school district there. So they actually oversee the South Summit Aquatic Center, which is that indoor pool and then there’s a fitness center to there. They are much smaller. They run a couple of programs a year, I believe they’re only two or three full time employees. So I do know that there are options there. i To be honest, I don’t have any specifics on programs. And then I don’t believe North Summit has a recreation department or I know that there was some talk about, like a community club sort of to put on that those types of things. But as far as I know, I don’t believe Kobo has. Oh, they do have a Recreation District. Okay, cool. So, there you go. But yeah, I like I said, I know very little. So.

Mary Christa Smith  
Thank you. Thanks, Melina. So in the chat, you can see Melina Stevens, who’s on our Summit County Council says that the North summit does have a Recreation District and they’re in the process of building out more fields for recreational programming for adults and children. So thank you for adding that here as well. Do you know if they have a sliding scale fee? I do not. I used to live in Kamus. And it’s been probably five years since I’ve lived there. I do not recall a sliding scale fee at the Fitness and Aquatic Center. But I can’t speak to that definitively. Any other questions or comments? Feel free? If you know if you don’t have a question, but if you have a comment, feel free to pop that in the Q&A or the chat as well.

Joey Thurgood  
I do have a question for Nathan just kind of thinking a little bit about about access to opportunity across such a broad County where you have some areas that are a little bit a little bit more heavily populated than other words, others like in North and Eastern. Nathan, are there higher? When we look at social isolation? Do we see endorsement for higher levels of social isolation in more rural and frontier areas for teens? Or does that stay pretty steady across the state?

Nathan Malan  
I don’t have that data. It’s complicated with with our provincial needs assessment, because we can look at the aggregate data for the state. And when you break things down, even if the different levels we have to get permissions from the different school districts to be looking at that data. And so looking even at just rural versus more urban districts, that is it’s not currently possible, I don’t know. We’re still still trying to figure out the best way to do analysis with this data. And there’s there’s there’s efforts right now for I know that there’s at least one other epidemiologist on the group that does work. We have IBIS, where there’s all sorts of Utah specific health data. And we’re gonna get the prevention needs assessment that Youth Survey data on IBIS, where you’ll be able to see statistical differences and everything. There’s currently a tool to look at the aggregate data for the whole state. But in that tool, you can’t look at statistical significance. And you can’t break things down by geography at all.

Joey Thurgood  
So Nathan, if some of these smaller school districts or municipalities were to come to you and want to look at that a little bit more closely, and you had kind of their input and their cooperation, would you be able to provide them a closer look?

Nathan Malan  
Yeah, I believe that, yeah, it’s they get given their specific data to the school district, so they can do whatever they want with that data. So yeah, if if Summit County wants to work with their school districts that may can look to specific analysis, as far as I understand with that, that data is specific to their school districts.

Mary Christa Smith  
I’m curious Joey and Nathan, from a state level perspective, when it comes to fostering social connections. Do you have examples in your work of communities that are doing a really good job in addressing this particular protective factor and how are they doing it?

Joey Thurgood  
Well, just a couple off the top of my head, I would say that there are some different demographic groups in the Salt Lake County area that do a really good job about cultural within their cultures, of creating connectedness. So you see that a lot in the poly communities. Another example would be within the Spanish speaking communities. The Guadalupe school is a charter school in the Rose Park, Glendale area that offers more than just schooling they’re providing English as a second language after school, and they’re providing jobs training, and they’re providing child care, and they’re kind of they’ve created a little bit of a hub for their community in order to help them access really concrete supports in, you know, applying for jobs and things like that. But then there are also things that they provide that are just like, groups of moms that can get together and talk about mom’s stuff, you know, support groups and things like this, that, you know, in a community where, where everybody’s, you know, pretty much experiencing similar things. And so, there are some communities, I think that and this is one thing that I did not note, as we were doing our portion of the presentation, but the Violence and Injury Prevention Program is actually in the process right now of building out what is going to be called the together you talk campaign. And that together, you can you talk campaign is going to be focused solely on improving protective factors for Utahns, it’s going to be very much focused on increasing connectedness, and reducing stigma around help seeking and then avenues for help seeking. And so at the state level, we’re trying to impress upon the local, you know, the local communities, the importance of taking on this mantle, if you want strong communities, within your cities and towns, that you’ve got to take a really active role in that. We can do lots of stuff at the state level and make lots of recommendations, but that isn’t necessarily going to trickle down until you get a champion at the local level that takes it and really implements it. So we’re happy to support any local areas that are wanting to move forward in this area. And we’re hoping that that together Utah campaign will kind of be a catalyst for that. But as far as local efforts, I think you find those local efforts that are more connected to church groups and religious and cultural groups than you do just broadly. There’s so so yeah, yes, and no. But I think that every community’s attempt at improving connectedness looks different, because every community’s demographic is different, every community’s needs are different. And so it really is going to take take kind of a ground level, like bringing together those folks and then saying, you know, looking at the data that Nathan can provide, and and saying, Where are where are our areas of concern, and how do we address them. And, and then building from there, but listening to what Hailee was talking about, that she’s doing through the whole church or organization, I was just like, This is amazing, because in my personal life, my family does a lot of outreach to the homeless. And, and folks who are just recently being re homed, and we’ve talked about kind of a thrift situation to try and maintain that effort to bring in a little bit of extra money, but to also clear out donations we received that aren’t really usable for the for the population that we’re serving. But I just think that it just takes a champion to get it started. And we at the state level are happy to provide kind of the substance and the science to underlie it, but and be supportive, but it really just takes a champion at the local level.

Mary Christa Smith  
Thank you so much, Joey. I am not seeing any questions or comments in the chat. Go ahead, Nathan.

Nathan Malan  
Just gonna jump in as well. One other good example, specifically kind of looking at our data, where we see LGBTQ individuals identifying as more socially isolated and things I think encircle them in Provo, which reaches out to the LGBT community there. It’s it’s only for adults is our understanding for 18 Plus, but I think that things like that, like identifying those, those most at risk communities and giving them places where they can come together and get the support that they need is really, really important. So that’s another good example.

Joey Thurgood  
Definitely within a culturally competent space, and I think that’s something that we have to be really careful of when we’re trying to build connectedness is that we’re just that old adage not for us without us. We want to make sure that any services that are provided in building community connectedness are culturally appropriate for sure.

Mary Christa Smith  
Thank you. I appreciate that. I thought whole story about asking the kids what they wanted and needed was a wonderful example of Nothing about us without us. I wanted to point our Summit County residents. We will send this out in the follow up for this webinar for those of you who’ve registered but the Summit County The Behavioral Health Department conducted a survey in I think it’s been about a year ago it was for adults. But there are indicators within the survey around community connectedness. So within your organization’s if you’re wondering what does social connection look like in Summit County, Utah, I would point you towards the survey, and I’ll make sure to include it. And it’s broken down by by gender, by age, by income, and by race. And so I think it can be a really useful tool in figuring out how to target particular population. So it was in 2021, that the survey was done. They have indicators in here about loneliness, and they talk about the questions asked around that. It’s also broken down by zip code. For people who indicate that they are experiencing high rates of loneliness. They talk about friendships, they talk about community connectedness, and identity. So I will not go through that whole survey with you. But we do have some really good local data. And again, that’s for adults, not for youth and to Nathan’s point, the Sharpe survey is our Keystone survey for youth when it comes to behavioral health, mental health substance use. It’s a really important survey. So I hope that our community can be greatly supportive of our continued efforts to have robust participation in that survey. I’m just looking at the chat. And I see that Kristen has put in here has so much happening on much deeper level to undermine all these awesome, incredible efforts. And keeps them from working as well as they might would love to explore more deeply at some point. Thank you, Kristen, I see your, your chat here as well, if you want to put your contact information, and I’m happy to connect with you after the webinar. If there aren’t any other questions, and I don’t see any questions in the Q&A or in the chat, I just want to thank Nathan, Joey, Cole and Hailee for your time today for providing this important information. Again, we will send out a follow up notes for all of you who’ve registered it will be posted to our website if you would like to refer colleagues to it in the future. And I’m really grateful for you bringing your expertise in the world of prevention. We know that working cross organizationally collaborating that we each hold a piece of the puzzle of what it takes to create a healthy community where our young people can thrive. And we each have a role to play whether it’s as grandparents, neighbors, church leaders, recreation, swim coaches, whatever we all can play a role in this. And what I also appreciate about the social determinants of health is it can help us look cross organizationally at our shared risk and protective factors and find ways in which we can share resources and support one another. So thank you to all of you for your expertise, your time and your participation are next. This is a five part series. We have not yet selected the date for our next webinar, but I will email to all of you when that will be taking place. And it’s focused on neighborhood built environment will be related to issues around walkability, transportation, and housing, which is such a key issue in our community as well. So thank you to all of you. I hope you have a wonderful day today. Thank you to all who have listened in and taking time out of your Tuesday morning to be here with us.

Mary Christa Smith  
Bien. Buenos días a todos, gracias por aparecer a las 1030. Comenzaremos con nuestro seminario web sobre los determinantes sociales de la salud y la transformación de las comunidades a través de la conectividad social. Mi nombre es Mary Christa Smith y soy la directora de Communities That Care Summit County. Y como la Coalición de Prevención Juvenil de nuestra Comunidad, nuestros esfuerzos son para convocar y proporcionar un foro para que las organizaciones trabajen juntas de manera que promuevan el desarrollo saludable de los jóvenes. Y estoy realmente encantado de ser parte de este panel hoy con algunos oradores increíbles y darles la bienvenida a todos a este seminario web. Solo un par de cosas para tener en cuenta, antes de comenzar, puede hacer sus preguntas en la sección de preguntas y respuestas. Responderemos las preguntas al final del seminario web. Entonces, después de que nuestros cuatro panelistas hayan compartido con usted su PowerPoint y su información, haremos un espacio al final del seminario web para responder sus preguntas. Así que siéntase libre de escribirlas en las preguntas y respuestas en cualquier momento, y nos pondremos en contacto con ellas. Este seminario web se está grabando y estará disponible en nuestro sitio web si desea compartirlo con otras personas dentro de su organización en el futuro. Entonces, solo para ver quién está aquí hoy, si se toma un tiempo y solo pone su nombre y tal vez una organización si está con una en el chat, nos encantaría darles la bienvenida a todos aquí. Así que tómese un momento y escriba su nombre. Tenemos cerca de 40 asistentes hoy. Así que estamos muy contentos de darles la bienvenida a todos aquí. Creo que a todos les gustaría ver quién más está viendo este seminario web con ustedes. Me encantaría agradecer a nuestros socios que son clave para ayudarnos a reunir este increíble panel, el Departamento de Prevención de Lesiones y Violencia en la Salud de Utah, Nathan Malan y Joey Thurgood, se unen a nosotros del Departamento de Salud de Utah, así que bienvenidos. El Departamento de Salud del Condado de Summit también es un socio clave para nosotros en la convocatoria de este seminario web, junto con Park City Recreation y el Centro Cristiano de Park City. Así que gracias a todas estas organizaciones por su disposición a colaborar, compartir información y trabajar juntos. Le daré una descripción general rápida de este seminario web en particular. Y me tomaré un momento para presentar a nuestros panelistas. Y luego, cada uno dedicará unos 15 minutos a compartir contigo su trabajo en la comunidad. Hemos curado este panel para que tengamos una perspectiva de alto nivel del estado de Utah y también una perspectiva muy local del condado de Summit. Entonces, espero que disfrute ver esta intersección entre el nivel estatal y local y el trabajo que las organizaciones están haciendo para fomentar la salud y el bienestar.

El objetivo de Healthy People 2030 de aumentar el apoyo social y comunitario es uno de los factores de influencia más importantes pero menos apreciados de la salud y el bienestar. Las Comunidades Saludables son aquellas donde las personas reciben el apoyo social que necesitan. En los lugares donde viven, trabajan, aprenden y juegan. Muchos miembros de la comunidad enfrentan desafíos y peligros que no pueden controlar, ya sea discriminación en vecindarios inseguros o problemas para pagar las cosas que necesitan, y estos desafíos pueden tener un impacto negativo en la salud y la seguridad a lo largo de la vida. Sin embargo, las relaciones positivas en el hogar y en la comunidad pueden ayudar a reducir estos impactos negativos. Las intervenciones para ayudar a las personas a obtener el apoyo social y comunitario que necesitan son fundamentales para mejorar la salud y el bienestar. Y hoy, nuestra presentación se centrará en la transformación de las comunidades a través de un contexto social y comunitario mejorado. Tenemos cuatro panelistas que se unen a nosotros hoy. El primero es Joey Thurgood del Departamento de Salud de Utah. Joey comenzó su carrera en prevención hace 21 años en la organización Prevent Child Abuse Utah y ha trabajado en el Departamento de Salud de Utah durante 11 años. suyo, más recientemente como especialista en prevención de experiencias adversas en la infancia, Joey coordina la COALICIÓN DE UTAH para la protección de la infancia, una coalición multidisciplinaria en todo el estado centrada en garantizar relaciones y entornos seguros, estables y enriquecedores. Por todo lo que enseñaste a los niños. Joey es una Utah de toda la vida y madre de cuatro hijos. También nos acompaña Nathan Malan, también del Departamento de Salud de Utah, y ha trabajado como epidemiólogo y evaluador para el Programa de Prevención de Violencia y Lesiones en el Departamento de Salud de Utah durante los últimos dos años. Su trabajo se centra principalmente en recopilar y analizar datos para informar el trabajo de UC PC y los socios que trabajan en ACE y prevención de lesiones en todo el estado. Su formación académica incluye una licenciatura en Gestión de Servicios de Emergencia de la Universidad Brigham Young, Idaho, y una Maestría en Salud Pública de la Universidad de Granada en España. Cole Johnson de la recreación de Park City ha trabajado a tiempo completo durante los últimos cinco años con la ciudad. Y como coordinador de recreación, Cole supervisa una variedad de programas deportivos y recreativos para jóvenes y adultos y tiene una licenciatura en Parques, Recreación y Turismo, y una especialización en Desarrollo Humano y Estudios Familiares de la Universidad de Utah. Y por último, pero no menos importante, nos acompaña hoy Hailee Hernandez del Centro Cristiano de Park City. Hailee es la asistente del programa y coordinadora de voluntarios en el Centro Cristiano de Park City y su trabajo principal es en la tierra de datos como analista de datos que comprende las necesidades de las personas sin hogar y de bajos ingresos en Summit y el condado de Wasatch. Ella coordina con múltiples proveedores de servicios en los condados para informar al estado las necesidades y los servicios sociales y las brechas en los servicios. Y es graduada de Westminster College. Así que bienvenidos a nuestros panelistas de hoy. Y me gustaría pasar el tiempo para comenzar nuestra discusión con Nathan Malan. Así que Natan.

Nathan Malan  
Muy bien, muchas gracias. ¿Pueden ver mi pantalla? Bien. Bien. Así que buenos días. Y gracias por la invitación a participar en este encuentro. Hoy, estoy muy emocionada de hablarles sobre un tema de salud pública tan importante que es especialmente relevante con el COVID que hemos estado enfrentando y el aislamiento y la cuarentena, quiero comenzar recomendándoles primero un libro a todos, es hace un trabajo mucho mejor que el que podré hacer en los próximos 15 minutos de repasar la investigación sobre la conexión y el aislamiento social. Y, y es realmente una gran lectura. Es una de mis lecturas favoritas que he tenido en lo que va del año. Entonces, el libro reúne el poder curativo de la conexión humana en un mundo a veces solitario. Y es por el 19, Cirujano General de los Estados Unidos, Vivek Murthy. Y sí, realmente recomiendo que tengo un extracto aquí mismo. Eso introduce un poco nuestro tema. Pero lo que voy a cubrir hoy es, como dije, la investigación, vamos a ver los efectos negativos de la soledad y el aislamiento social, y el poder protector positivo de la conexión social. Y luego voy a presentar un poco los datos de Utah que tenemos. Y luego Joey, mis colegas participarán para hablar sobre los diferentes esfuerzos que se están realizando en todo el estado. Entonces, esta serie de seminarios web que ustedes están haciendo se centra en los determinantes sociales de la salud y en avanzar río arriba. Y este es un ejemplo elemental de moverse contra la corriente. Tienes las pirámides de impacto en la salud pública aquí. Y realmente abordar la conexión social. Es la base de ambas pirámides y es una estrategia de intervención universal. Y también es un factor socioeconómico que puede tener el mayor impacto. Puede afectar todo tipo de enfermedades y salud diferentes a lo largo de la vida. Así que es muy importante abordarlo. Y para aclarar la importancia de esto, quiero señalar un poco de investigación que el profesor Holt Lowenstein, quien dirige el Laboratorio de Investigación de Salud y Conexión Social en BYU, ha realizado realmente aquí en Utah. Es reconocida en todo el mundo por un par de metaanálisis realmente geniales que hizo en 2010 y 2012, que realmente destacaron el hecho de que la soledad es un factor de riesgo tan grande como algunas de las principales cosas en las que pensamos, como la obesidad. y el tabaquismo y la pobreza en nuestra salud. Y así, una conexión es que el impacto de la soledad es equivalente a fumar 15 cigarrillos por día. Y no creo que la gente entienda o reconozca que todos entendemos que fumar es malo para uno. Pero, ¿entendemos que al no tener una buena vida socialmente conectada, eso también está afectando nuestra salud en esa medida? El artículo de 2015 también presentó esto, esta estadística aquí que 29 Hay un aumento del 29% en la probabilidad de muerte prematura en general, con la soledad. ¿Y por qué es eso? ¿Asi que? ¿Cómo causa la muerte? El hombre es por naturaleza un animal social, según Aristóteles, y la investigación también lo demuestra definitivamente. Evolucionamos en grupos, y realmente nos necesitamos unos a otros, sentirnos socialmente aislados, activa mecanismos neurobiológicos que promueven la autoconservación a corto plazo, pero puede afectar nuestra salud y bienestar y una soledad y desconexión social a largo plazo, y no tiene efectos negativos en nuestros corazones que conduzcan a enfermedades cardíacas y presión arterial alta, puede afectar nuestros cerebros aumentando el riesgo de accidente cerebrovascular, demencia, depresión, ansiedad e insomnio. Puede afectar nuestra capacidad para combatir enfermedades, puede afectar nuestra toma de decisiones, manifestando problemas de control de impulsos y falta de juicio. También puede tener impactos epigenéticos y cómo nuestros genes se expresan en nuestros cuerpos. Entonces, la conclusión es que la conexión social es una fuerza enormemente no reconocida y reconocida, no reconocida y subestimada. Eso nos impacta como individuos y nos impacta como producto, sociedad comunitaria. Abuso de sustancias, relaciones, suicidio, todas esas cosas pueden estar conectadas.

 

En el libro, la soledad o, juntos, un día de trabajo bifurcado, hace un muy buen trabajo al presentar la importancia de los diferentes niveles de conexión. Cada ser humano necesita cada uno de estos diferentes niveles de conexiones para sentirse completo, completo y saludable. Ciertamente, como individuos, tenemos diferentes niveles de cada uno de los que necesitamos. Pero necesitamos conexiones íntimas, otro confidente cercano significativo, necesitamos esos círculos sociales relacionales, esas personas que nos aceptan como somos y con las que nos conectamos, puse estas pequeñas líneas onduladas porque es nuestro grupo único de personas que encontramos. conexión. Y luego también necesitamos la conexión comunitaria más amplia. Y cada uno de ellos es realmente importante para que podamos tener una gran, podemos estar casados ​​y tener una gran relación con nuestro cónyuge y aún así sentirnos solos. Y eso es porque también necesitamos estos otros niveles de conexión. Y entonces, hablamos sobre los impactos negativos de la soledad y el aislamiento social. Pero hablemos del poder protector positivo. Entonces, el marco del factor protector es un gran punto de partida. Es un marco muy bien investigado y ampliamente utilizado para prevenir y abordar el abuso y la negligencia infantil. Y hay cinco factores protectores y, como pueden ver aquí, el número dos es la conexión social. Y así, se ha demostrado que este marco reduce el abuso y la negligencia infantil, así como una miríada de otros resultados de violencia y lesiones. La investigación también muestra que estos factores de protección son factores de promoción que pueden fortalecer a la familia y crear un entorno familiar que promueva un desarrollo infantil óptimo. Desarrollo Infantil y Juvenil. Además, si no está familiarizado con la investigación de Experiencias Adversas en la Infancia, le recomendaría investigar que en los años 90, había un médico en California que descubrió que el trauma en la infancia podría tener efectos en la salud a lo largo de la vida. Y desde hace 2030 años eso ha estado sucediendo. Y hay mejor evidencia que muestra que cuanto más trauma que experiencias adversas en la infancia tiene una persona, más probable es que tenga impactos adversos en la salud en el futuro y muera temprano. Pero en los últimos 10 años, ha habido una investigación realmente excelente que también está analizando las experiencias positivas de la infancia. Y entonces, estas cosas específicas que pueden ser en la vida de los niños que protegen contra los impactos negativos a largo plazo de las experiencias infantiles adversas, para que alguien pueda tener una puntuación alta, una experiencia infantil adversa, una puntuación, y aun así crecer y tener una vida sana. vida y no tener esos impactos negativos a largo plazo en su salud. ¿Y cuáles son esas experiencias positivas de la infancia? Entonces, tiene un montón de nombres diferentes, tiene experiencias infantiles ventajosas, contras, experiencias infantiles holandesas y un par de medidas diferentes. Una medida que estamos usando aquí en nuestro servidor para adultos que hacemos en todo el estado son las experiencias positivas de la infancia. Encuesta de siete, siete preguntas. Y leámoslos muy rápido porque todos tienen que ver con la conexión. Y así, cuando era niño, pude hablar con mi familia sobre mis sentimientos sentí que mi familia estuvo a mi lado durante los momentos difíciles, disfruté participando en las tradiciones comunitarias, tuve un sentido de pertenencia en la escuela secundaria sentí el apoyo de amigos, al menos dos los adultos no paternos que se interesaban genuinamente por mí se sentían seguros y protegidos por mi familia, por un adulto en el hogar. Por lo tanto, las experiencias positivas de la infancia se centran en la construcción de relaciones y conexiones saludables dentro del entorno familiar, escolar y comunitario. Y realmente, queremos que seas resistente. Entonces, lo que básicamente nos muestra esta investigación es que las conexiones saludables facilitan la resiliencia. Entonces, si queremos que un niño sea resistente, necesita un buen sistema de apoyo a su alrededor y sentir que tiene personas que se preocupan por él y lo están cuidando. Entonces, mirando los datos de Utah, repasaré un par de encuestas diferentes que utilizamos mucho en el estado. Y estas son excelentes encuestas porque podemos desglosar los datos a nivel local. Y entonces puede tener un gran impacto en su trabajo en el condado de Summit. Y entonces tenemos el BRFSS, que es la encuesta del Sistema de Encuesta de Vigilancia de Factores de Riesgo del Comportamiento. Y eso se hace anualmente. Es para todos los adultos de 18 años. Además, en todo el estado, obtenemos una muestra representativa y preguntamos sobre una gran variedad de resultados y comportamientos de salud diferentes. Hacemos una encuesta similar con los jóvenes, cada dos años dentro de las escuelas. Está hecho con estudiantes de sexto a octavo, décimo y duodécimo grado, puede ver las tasas de participación en la esquina inferior derecha para 2019 y 2021. Y es una encuesta realmente excelente, todos sus distritos escolares tendrán datos específicos para su distrito escolar y cosas, que pueden ser realmente útiles si buscas abordar este tema. Entonces, antes de que yo llegara al Departamento de Salud de Utah, alguien era muy inteligente. Y decidieron que deberían agregar esta escala de aislamiento social a ambas encuestas. Y esta escala incluida es una escala reconocida a nivel nacional. Y N incluye estas cuatro preguntas. En los últimos siete días me he sentido excluida, que la gente apenas me conoce, aislada de los demás, que la gente me rodea, pero no conmigo. Mis opciones de respuesta son nunca rara vez, a veces a menudo siempre. Y cómo luego analizamos el estado que buscamos para las diversas personas incluidas en la asistencia social que van a estar en mayor riesgo, que respondieron con frecuencia o siempre para ofrecer estas preguntas. Y cuando hicimos este análisis, ¿qué creen todos ustedes que encontramos? Entonces, ¿estos son los grupos de edad divididos en 48 grupos de edad diferentes, para grupos de edad de adultos y luego para diferentes grados? En el chat, ¿les importaría poner en qué grupos de edad creen que es más probable que indiquen que están muy aislados socialmente? Así que el número ocho, los adultos mayores de 65 años o más, los alumnos de sexto grado, los alumnos de 10/10, supongo. Está bien, bueno, no me tomaré mucho tiempo con esto ya que me estoy quedando sin tiempo. Pero lo que encontramos es que esto es aislamiento social percibido. Así que esta no es una medida objetiva. Estas son las personas, cómo sienten lo que sienten por estar socialmente aisladas. Y lo que descubrimos abrumadoramente es que es mucho más probable que los jóvenes indiquen que están muy aislados socialmente, y especialmente nuestros estudiantes de décimo grado, pueden ver que es donde las cosas alcanzan su punto máximo. Y así, el 10,7 % de los encuestados jóvenes, en comparación con el 1,8 % de los encuestados adultos, se categorizaron como muy aislados socialmente en 2019. Y luego, cuando obtengamos nuestros datos de 2021 sobre la pandemia de COVID, ¿qué vemos aumentos significativos en todos? nuestra juventud, nuestros datos de adultos para 2021 No regresamos de los CDC hasta septiembre. Así que lamentablemente no tengo eso. Pero me imagino que probablemente también veremos algunos aumentos en los adultos. Pero esto es realmente preocupante.La investigación muestra que se realizó un estudio longitudinal, creo que en Escocia, este analizó a los niños que se identificaron como jóvenes socialmente aislados y los siguió hasta la edad adulta. Y lo que encontraron es que el aislamiento social tiene efectos perjudiciales persistentes y acumulativos en la salud de los adultos. Entonces, esto es algo que realmente debemos abordar. Um, creo que mientras discutimos esta escala de aislamiento social, es útil entender qué se incluye en esa designación. Nuevamente, tenemos esas cuatro preguntas aquí, tanto en jóvenes como en adultos, es más probable que indiquen que en los últimos siete días, he sentido que las personas están a mi alrededor, pero no conmigo. Y también dentro de los datos del condado de Summit. Esto es del informe del condado de Summit que se produjo. Joey en realidad, ¿puedes lanzar esto en el chat? Te daré un enlace a este informe.

Joey Thurgood  
¿Ese no era el que acabas de darme ya? ¿El afilado que puse en eso?

Nathan Malan  
Oh, ponlo en el chat.

Joey Thurgood  
Sí.

Nathan Malan  
Pero sí, estas son las respuestas de aislamiento social para el condado de Summit. El, se puede ver aquí. Así que tienes seis 810 estudiantes de 12º grado, y luego en general, los puntos negros son el promedio estatal. Y luego el azul son las respuestas de 2021. Y como ven, también en algunos del condado sentí que la gente a mi alrededor, pero no conmigo, fue la respuesta más alta. También resalte rápidamente aquí que los estudiantes de octavo grado, en las cuatro preguntas en el condado de Summit, tenían más probabilidades que el promedio estatal de indicar que se sentían socialmente aislados con esas diferentes preguntas. Entonces, ¿de qué iba a hablar aquí? Entonces, sí, pero a medida que abordamos el aislamiento social, creo que lo que debemos recordar aquí es que tal vez un punto de partida importante es abordar las barreras para que las personas expresen su identidad auténtica a quienes las rodean. Y esto también nos ayuda a comprender mejor los grupos de mayor riesgo de los que voy a hablar ahora. Y así, con un análisis más detallado, dividimos las cosas por diferentes datos demográficos. Y lo que encontramos es que tuvimos una mayor prevalencia de muy socialite de aquellos muy socialmente aislados, los individuos en nuestra juventud LGBTQ son jóvenes trans, fueron 46% versus jóvenes no trans, que están en 15% 16%, jóvenes bisexuales 42%. En comparación con el 13 %, gays y lesbianas, el 37 % y el 13 % de los jóvenes que no comían juntos en familia, se puede ver que hay una gran disparidad entre las familias que solo comen juntos y cómo los jóvenes se identifican socialmente como muy jóvenes aislados, no SUD como la cultura predominante en el estado, vemos que aquellos que no son SUD 22% versus 11%. Y luego las mujeres jóvenes son el 20%, en comparación con el 9% de los hombres, y los jóvenes no blancos el 18% en comparación con el 14% de los jóvenes blancos. Entonces, algunas, algunas cosas a considerar, y algunas son algunas, algunos grupos que están específicamente en mayor riesgo de indicar que se identifican como muy aislados socialmente. Además, si observa los datos de adultos, vemos que nuestros cuidadores y padres solteros tienen tasas más altas de aislamiento social. Y creo que eso es importante ya que estamos tratando de abordar las dos generaciones, y ver cómo las familias están modelando las cosas, importante que estemos abordando a los padres, la conexión de los padres, para que puedan ser buenos ejemplos para sus jóvenes de cómo ser para vivir vidas conectadas y saludables. Me estoy quedando sin tiempo, así que no entraré demasiado en esto. Pero básicamente, hablé de esos tres niveles diferentes de conexión que son necesarios. Y con los jóvenes, puede ser un poco diferente que con los adultos. Pero hay todos estos factores diferentes. La tecnología es muy importante. En este momento, donde los jóvenes están mucho conectados a través de la tecnología, es importante que entendamos la importancia de tal vez permitir esa conexión a veces, incluso cuando estamos tratando de abordar la sobreutilización de las redes sociales y todo, asegurándonos de que estamos permitiendo que nuestro jóvenes para tener conexión y encontrar una conexión real más allá de simplemente mirar fotos y gustarles y cosas. Um, así que dentro de la evaluación de las necesidades de prevención o la Encuesta de Jóvenes, tienen perfiles de riesgo y protección realmente buenos que hacen, hay cientos de preguntas que les hicieron a estos jóvenes. ¿Qué tan conectado estás con tu madre y tu padre? ¿Sientes que puedes hablar sobre sentirte triste o desesperanzado, o cualquiera de esas cosas? Y, como puede ver, todos están conectados aquí, no se han dividido en diferentes categorías: comunidad, familia, escuela e individuo. Y hay una gran cantidad de datos disponibles para comprender mejor dónde se sienten desconectados los jóvenes. Si es a nivel comunitario, si es a nivel familiar, y si es así, dentro del nivel familiar, ¿cómo podemos abordar eso? ¿Es esa su relación con sus madres? ¿Sienten que están teniendo la oportunidad de conectarse con sus padres de la manera que les gusta? ¿Están teniendo comidas familiares juntos? Y sí, realmente espero que trabajen con sus distritos escolares y trabajen con los informes que se han creado para llevar estos datos a cada una de las diferentes comunidades en todo el estado porque es realmente , datos realmente poderosos que se pueden usar de muy buenas maneras. Así que le voy a pasar el tiempo a Joey, para hablar más sobre esto, pero sobre lo que está pasando en todo el estado. Pero si tiene alguna pregunta o desea algún dato, también estoy dispuesto a obtener datos o conectarlo con alguien que le proporcione los datos correctos para su trabajo en el condado de Summit. Así que gracias por su tiempo. Y Joey, ¿quieres tomar el control?

Joey Thurgood  
Oh, oye, ya me había hecho cargo y había entrado en mi discurso y no me di cuenta de que todavía estaba silenciado. Hola todos. Mi nombre es Joey Thurgood. Soy especialista en prevención de Experiencias Adversas en la Infancia del Departamento de Salud de Utah. Y mi trabajo es coordinar la COALICIÓN DE UTAH para la protección de la niñez. La COALICIÓN DE UTAH para la protección de la infancia es una coalición multidisciplinaria, realmente, dije que divertido es una coalición multidisciplinaria en todo el estado enfocada en enfoques de prevención primaria para garantizar relaciones y entornos seguros, estables y enriquecedores para todos los niños de Utah. El esfuerzo está financiado a través de las subvenciones CDC Essentials for Childhood. Y solo para darle un poco más de comprensión de lo que queremos decir con prevención primaria. Si miras este pequeño cuadro verde, no es muy fácil de leer porque es verde sobre verde y te prometo que no lo diseñé. La prevención primaria requiere un cambio de un enfoque en los programas a un enfoque en iniciativas de prevención de mayor alcance y un enfoque del individuo a un enfoque en el medio ambiente. Hacemos esto enfocándonos en las causas fundamentales o en los factores de riesgo y protección, como mencionó Nathan anteriormente, si el IPP ha identificado la conexión como un súper factor para la prevención, lo que significa que subraya casi todo, es uno de los más influyentes y, como mencionó antes. , uno de los que más fácilmente se pasa por alto. Previene una miríada de malos resultados de violencia y lesiones, incluido el suicidio, el trastorno por uso de sustancias, el maltrato infantil y la violencia doméstica. Siguiente diapositiva, Nathan. Así que no sé cuántos de ustedes saben que este mes es el mes del fortalecimiento familiar. ¿Alguna idea de cuál solía ser la designación de este mes? Poner en el chat? ¿Esto está representado por hermosos molinetes azules? ¿Qué celebramos en abril? ¿O? ¿O nos dimos cuenta en abril de que se trataba de un molinete azul? Exactamente el Mes de la Prevención del Abuso Infantil. Entonces, como hemos cambiado esto que esto e incluso tenemos una declaración del Gobernador, tuve que cortar su sello, porque era porque el PDF no cabía. Al lado está la página principal de The Family Strengthening much month Toolkit, que mostraré en el chat ahora mismo para que la revisen. Y reconozco que ya va la mitad del mes. Pero todavía hay muy buena información aquí. Y la razón por la que lo menciono es porque es muy importante ayudar a la gente a entender por qué el cambio, por qué nos estamos alejando de la prevención del abuso infantil a este otro enfoque. Somos solo uno de un par de estados que han hecho este cambio. Y la razón es porque y haré que Nathan pase a la siguiente etapa. O disculpe la siguiente diapositiva. El tema es construir juntos un mañana mejor para todos los niños. La razón por la que pasamos del Mes de la Prevención del Abuso Infantil al mes del fortalecimiento familiar es porque nos estamos enfocando en esos enfoques ascendentes que son aplicables a todos. Cuando decimos el Mes de la Prevención del Abuso Infantil, ¿quién es nuestro público objetivo? ¿A quién le estamos hablando? Estamos hablando con ellos, ¿verdad? Esas familias que tienen ese problema, no estamos hablando de mi problema o mi vecino, o el problema de mis hermanas. Porque creemos en nuestras cabezas que el abuso infantil le sucede a otro tipo de personas, no nos sucede a nosotros. Así que este enfoque está en enfoques, enfoques, oh, Dios mío, no puedo hablar, nos enfoca en enfoques ascendentes que son aplicables a todos. Se enfoca en preservar y fortalecer a la familia y cada familia se beneficia de un entorno familiar fuerte. Favorece los factores protectores. Promueve la conexión familiar, nos animó a la comunidad, nuestra participación comunitaria al reconocer que se necesita un pueblo que todos tengamos un papel que desempeñar en el fortalecimiento de las familias, porque cuando fortalecemos a las familias, fortalecemos a las comunidades, y aleja la conversación. de otros, ser otros. Para nosotros, depende de todos nosotros asegurarnos de que los niños se críen en relaciones y entornos fuertes, saludables y enriquecedores. Y así, estas son algunas de las cositas lindas que puedes encontrar en Prevent Child Abuse, o en el sitio web de Prevent Child Abuse America, los niños crecen localmente, nuestro trabajo tiene sus raíces en la ciencia. Realmente es una intención movernos hacia un lenguaje y mensajes más inclusivos que afectarán a todos. Pero uno de los mayores problemas con la conectividad y una de las mayores barreras es la búsqueda de ayuda. Uno de los beneficios más importantes y poderosos de tener fuertes conexiones sociales es el impacto que tiene en la búsqueda de ayuda. Hay momentos en que todos los adultos necesitan ayuda adicional. Tenga en cuenta que no hay que avergonzarse de buscar ayuda cuando la necesita, ya que las preocupaciones de los padres sobre la salud mental son apoyos concretos, como el cuidado de los niños, la comida, el alquiler y el transporte. Trate de aceptar ayuda cuando alguien se la ofrezca y piense en formas en las que pueda ayudar a otros que lo necesiten. llamar a un amigo o hablar con una persona de confianza en su vida puede ayudarlo a sobrellevar los momentos difíciles. Y te da la oportunidad de conectarte, compartir y aprender de los demás. Al pedir ayuda, usted está modelando comportamientos de afrontamiento saludables para su hijo, no le está mostrando a su hijo que es débil. Si ellos si ellos no piden ayuda. Le está mostrando a su hijo cómo sobrellevar la situación de una manera saludable al pedir ayuda. Así que haz clic una vez más en cualquier cosa. Así que aquí está la gran pregunta, amigos. ¿Por qué es tan difícil pedir ayuda? Entonces, en el chat, ponga un par de razones en las que pueda pensar que podrían ser barreras para la búsqueda de ayuda. Cualquier cosa que se te ocurra escribir en el chat. ¿Por qué alguien podría no pedir ayuda? Son una carga. Están avergonzados, están ahí. Están avergonzados, aunque otros descubrirán muy bien su orgullo. No quieren que los demás se enteren. Así que hay un estigma ahí mismo, vergüenza asociado con eso. Amenaza su sentido de identidad. Es verdad. Todos estos son buenos ejemplos de por qué las personas podrían no pedir ayuda. Bueno, una de las partes más importantes de la conexión no es solo conectar a las personas de una manera cálida y difusa espiritual y emocionalmente con otros, como Nathan estaba hablando principalmente sobre esas conexiones con grupos, conexiones con otros que tienen ideas afines, pero también necesitamos conectarnos con la gente. servimos a los recursos reales que son la conexión, por lo que, como parte del mes de fortalecimiento familiar, nuestra coordinadora de gorra CB, Tricia Reynolds, gorra CB significa prepárate. Coordinador de prevención de abuso infantil basado en la comunidad. Ese es un título muy grande también. Pero como parte del lanzamiento del mes de fortalecimiento familiar, se asoció con 211 de United Way para crear una página de recursos para padres en el sitio web dos en uno. Así que verás en azul aquí al costado, ese es el menú en 211 de United Way. Verás aquí en la parte inferior de la página que he agregado la URL para llegar allí. Pero la segunda pestaña en su página es Recursos para padres. Y cuando hace clic en eso, si va hacia el lado derecho de la página, verá cinco áreas desglosadas por los factores de protección que Nathan acaba de explicarle resiliencia de los padres, conexiones sociales, crianza de los hijos y desarrollo infantil. , apoyo concreto y competencia socioemocional. Si necesita ayuda con los servicios de cuidado de niños, haga clic en apoyos concretos, no solo encontrará opciones para el cuidado de niños, sino que también verá enlaces para ayudar con la administración del dinero e incluso servicios legales. Cada sección lo llevará directamente a enlaces asociados con los muchos temas enumerados en el medio de la diapositiva. Así que vea todas esas cosas enumeradas en el centro de la diapositiva.

Esas son solo una muestra de los diferentes recursos a los que puede conectarse a través de este increíble recurso que 211 armó junto con usted El Departamento de Servicios Humanos. Y finalmente, y sé que este mes casi ha terminado. Pero si tiene pequeños, en edad de primaria, en edad preescolar, otra parte del mes de fortalecimiento familiar fue la aplicación The Goose Chase. Y ese caso de uso el ganso Goseck. Vaya, no puedo hablar con la aplicación Goose Chase creada por mi destino de descubrimiento. Es básicamente una búsqueda del tesoro. Y lo que hace es animar a las familias a pasar tiempo de calidad juntos, ayuda a enseñarles cosas de prevención. Y ayuda con algo de desarrollo personal dentro de la familia. Y ha sido muy bien recibido. Entonces, si está interesado, puede ir y descargarlo en cualquiera de las aplicaciones, en cualquiera de las tiendas de aplicaciones, podría estar en mi destino de descubrimiento, podría estar en la aplicación boost Chase, pero es bastante divertido. Bien, siguiente diapositiva. Por lo que sabemos, Nathan, tendrás que hacer clic en estos de uno en uno. Sabemos que la conexión nos hace más saludables. Nos hace más productivos. Nos hace más creativos. Resiliencia. Nos hace más plenos y nos hace más completos. Y como dijo Jane Howard, llámalo clan llamado red llamada tribu. Llámalo familia, como quieras llamarlo, quienquiera que seas, necesitas uno, necesitas uno porque eres humano. Ahora bien, hay muchas definiciones de conectividad que se pueden dar. Y el aburrido que obtienes de CDC es que la conexión se refiere a una sensación de cuidado, apoyo y pertenencia, y puede centrarse en sentirse conectado con el trabajo escolar, la familia u otras personas importantes en la organización de la vida de una persona. Poori me gustan los marrones de Brene, su definición. Y notará que he resaltado ciertas palabras en las que quiero que piense mientras leo esto. la conexión es la energía que existe entre las personas cuando se sienten vistas, escuchadas y valoradas, cuando pueden dar y recibir sin juzgar. Y cuando derivan sustento y fuerza de la relación, eso es conexión. Así que finalmente, los últimos pensamientos de Vivek Murthy juntos y por favor, Nathan y yo recomendamos encarecidamente que lean este libro, es fantástico. Pero esto es directamente de su libro. Y quiero, como que quiero terminar con esto. La creación de una vida conectada comienza con las decisiones que tomamos en nuestro día a día. ¿Elegimos hacer tiempo para las personas? ¿Nos mostramos como nosotros mismos? ¿Buscamos a los demás con amabilidad, reconociendo el poder del servicio para unirnos? Este trabajo no siempre es fácil. Requiere coraje, el coraje de ser vulnerable, de arriesgarse con los demás para creer en nosotros mismos. Pero a medida que construimos vidas conectadas, hacemos posible construir un mundo conectado. Muchas gracias chicos. Agradecemos tener la oportunidad de pasar este tiempo con usted. Nos quedaremos hasta el final. Entonces, si tiene alguna pregunta para nosotros, si hay algo que podamos hacer para apoyarlo en sus esfuerzos locales, estamos aquí para ayudarlo. Muchas gracias.

Mary Christa Smith  
Gracias, Joey. Realmente aprecio que comparta de manera reflexiva el poder de la conexión y cómo se manifiesta en nuestras comunidades y algunas ideas de lo que podemos hacer individualmente y a través de nuestras organizaciones para fomentar ese sentido de conexión comunitaria como un gran factor de protección. Así que gracias, gracias. Gracias. Estoy realmente encantado de presentarles a todos a Cole Johnston, quien trabaja en la recreación de Park City y compartirá con nosotros algunos de nuestros recursos locales cuando se trata de fomentar la conexión comunitaria. Y me encantaría para todos los que están en la llamada hoy. Veo a muchos de ustedes de varias organizaciones en nuestra comunidad para pensar en las formas en que pueden incorporar estas prácticas dentro de su propia organización porque no puede ser solo la recreación de Park City o el Centro Cristiano. Realmente nos lleva a todos incorporar de manera cuidadosa e intencional estas prácticas que fomentan conexiones tan geniales. Muchas gracias. Llevatelo.

Cole Johnston  
Gracias, María Cristina. Voy a compartir mi pantalla aquí. Y ojalá esto pase. Todos ven mi pantalla ahora mismo.

Mary Christa Smith  
Cole, podemos ver tu pantalla, pero está mostrando todo y sí, eso es todo. Eso es

Cole Johnston  
Bien. Frio. Me ubicaré aquí. Bueno, gracias a todos. Mi nombre es Cole Johnston. Soy coordinador de recreación aquí con Park City Recreation, Park City Municipal y PC MARC. Y he estado involucrado con Communities That Care durante bastantes años y he tratado de asistir a tantas reuniones como sea posible y ha sido realmente beneficioso para mí asistir a esas reuniones y realmente mirar, ya sabes, la comunidad como un todo. Y saben, lo que nosotros aquí en parques y recreación podemos hacer o, ya saben, hacer más para cultivar esta conexión comunitaria, a través de la recreación. Entonces, dicho esto, seguiré adelante y comenzaré. Así que solo un poco de breve historia, Park City. Entonces, nuestra declaración de misión es enriquecer las vidas de nuestra comunidad a través de personas, programas e instalaciones excepcionales. Ahora ponemos los programas de personas y las instalaciones en ese orden, porque las personas son nuestro número uno. Nuestro enfoque número uno, contratamos buenas personas, construimos buenas personas alrededor de nuestro equipo, ya sea personal de tiempo completo, ya sean instructores de tenis, ya sean salvavidas, contratamos personas excepcionales, porque sin esas personas, nuestros programas o nuestras instalaciones no Realmente no importa. Con eso, Park City, recreación administra y opera PC MARC, que es un centro de recreación aquí en la ciudad ubicado en Park Meadows. Y también operamos el tenis de Park City y, además de Park City, los parques, así que el parque de la ciudad, dondequiera que estacione y el nuevo Park City Heights Park y luego una variedad de programas deportivos, de acondicionamiento físico y de bienestar para adultos y jóvenes. Y la razón por la que digo eso es porque muchas personas cuando piensan en recreación, piensan solo en fútbol juvenil o creen que ya saben, deportes para adultos o fitness. Somos una organización comunitaria enfocada, sí, en la recreación, pero también en el bienestar comunitario, la conexión comunitaria. Y luego solo tengo una cita aquí, no hay mayor inversión comunitaria que una inversión en recreación. Ahora, solo quiero que mire esta diapositiva y observe cuántas veces dije que la comunidad o la comunidad aparecen en esta lista. En esta diapositiva, la comunidad aparece mucho en la recreación, está en nuestra declaración de misión. Está en nuestra descripción. Y está en muchas citas centradas en la recreación, estamos aquí para la comunidad, y estamos aquí para crear esa conexión comunitaria, vamos allá vamos. Está bien, lo siento por eso. Dificultad técnica. Así que voy a empezar con el PC MARC. Así que aquellos de ustedes que no están familiarizados con él. El Park City MARC es la abreviatura o es la abreviatura de Park City Municipal Athletic and Recreation Center. Solíamos ser el antiguo Racquet Club en Creo que quiero decir que la ciudad compró el antiguo club recreativo a finales de los 70. Y fue el Racquet Club hasta alrededor de 2010. Cuando fue demolido por completo y reconstruido en lo que es hoy PC MARC. Realmente con el MARC. Mucha gente piensa que es un centro de recreación, la gente puede venir aquí para asistir a una clase de gimnasia o puede hacer ejercicio o puede jugar tenis, pickleball o baloncesto. Pero realmente lo que nos esforzamos aquí es ir más allá de lo que tenemos si entras, tenemos un gran vestíbulo con muchos sofás y mesas cómodos y cómodos. Tenemos un sofá en la planta baja con un espacio de trabajo, tenemos una sala de reunión comunitaria. Porque queremos ser más que un centro recreativo, queremos ser un centro comunitario, queremos ser un lugar donde la gente pueda venir y reunirse, queremos ser un lugar donde la gente pueda reunirse con quizás un dietista o reunirse con un entrenador personal. La gente puede venir aquí para trabajar en proyectos grupales. La gente puede venir aquí para celebrar reuniones. Así que realmente queremos ser ese lugar al que la gente pueda venir, donde pueda reunirse y estar en un centro de recreación, queremos ser ese lugar al que pueda venir la comunidad, también somos muy diversos. Tenemos mucha diversidad diferente aquí. Viejos, gente mayor, gente joven. Y es un lugar que funciona, es un lugar muy diferente. Las personas pueden venir de diferentes edades y sí. Además, básicamente tenemos, ya sabes, tratamos de poner de nuevo, más que los deportes básicos tradicionales de recreación, tenemos manualidades comunitarias, tenemos eventos comunitarios, como nuestra búsqueda de bastones de caramelo con linterna. Durante las vacaciones, hemos hecho búsquedas de huevos de Pascua en el pasado. Haremos cosas diferentes, ya sabes, para tratar de involucrar a la comunidad más allá de los deportes típicos si eso tiene sentido. Entonces, nuevamente, el tema común es simplemente unir a las personas. Quería hablar sobre un programa específico que hacemos. Se llama lunes estudiantiles gratuitos, la historia detrás de este programa, en 2016, tuvimos un trágico y desafortunado paso a los adolescentes debido a las drogas. Y con eso, la ciudad realmente se acercó específicamente a nosotros aquí en recreación, la biblioteca, la pista de hielo, para decir, ya sabes, ¿qué podemos hacer para involucrar a la comunidad? ¿Qué podemos hacer para involucrar a estos niños específicamente, en, ya sabes, proporcionar espacios seguros que les proporcionen actividades para hacer, ya sabes, proporcionando tal vez una distracción, ya sabes, per se, para estos niños? Y originalmente nos sentamos y dijimos, está bien, ¿qué podemos hacer? Y dijimos, hagamos un programa de baloncesto para ellos, hagamos un torneo de ping pong para ellos, hagamos todas estas actividades y eventos. Y eso hicimos. Y tuvimos muy, muy poca participación. Y luego nos sentamos de nuevo y decidimos, bueno, volvamos a la mesa de dibujo, acerquémonos a los niños y decidamos lo que quieren. Y así obtuvimos permiso de algunas de las escuelas en el distrito escolar para salir y encontrar, ya sabes, simplemente encuestar a los niños, les preguntamos durante la hora del almuerzo que dijeran, oye, ¿y si hacemos algo? ¿Qué te gustaría ver? ¿Qué querrías que hiciéramos, ya sabes, que hiciéramos por ti? Y dijeron: Solo queremos un lugar para venir y pasar el rato. Ya sabes, dijeron muy simplemente, ya sabes, estamos sobreprogramados, tenemos, ya sabes, nuestros padres nos están dirigiendo en todas direcciones a este programa, a ese programa a esta lección de música a esta práctica. Y dijeron, solo queremos un lugar para venir y pasar el rato y realmente hacer lo que quieren. Y dijimos, está bien, eso suena genial. Entonces, en ese momento, y creo que sigue siendo el caso, pero el distrito escolar de Park City llega temprano, sale temprano los lunes. Y nuestra ubicación aquí en Park Meadows tiene acceso a pie desde McAllen, Treasure Mountain y la escuela secundaria. Y también son las tres escuelas que están en la línea de autobús, para venir aquí. Así que dijo: Bien, todos los lunes cuando sales de la escuela, en realidad, cualquier estudiante con una identificación de estudiante puede entrar gratis. Y básicamente no hicimos nada más que brindarles el espacio para que sean niños, aunque algunos vendrán y usarán el entrenamiento del gimnasio de baloncesto, les brindamos el espacio para que los niños hagan la tarea. Y realmente, eso es más o menos lo que sigue siendo hoy, es un lugar donde los niños pueden venir y estar seguros, pero sin supervisión. A veces, surgieron un par de problemas en los que, ya sabes, muchos estudiantes entraron a la vez, y pueden monopolizar el piso de fitness, o ocupar por completo un gimnasio de baloncesto. Y hemos recibido un par de quejas. Y, ya sabes, nos ocuparemos de esas quejas caso por caso. Pero realmente el tema central es que preferimos tenerlos aquí que en otro lugar haciendo algo donde probablemente deberían saber lo que no deberían estar haciendo o sin supervisión. Aquí en la marca, pueden venir aquí y sentir que están solos cuando sabes que en realidad están en un espacio seguro. Es algo genial lo que estamos haciendo. Y luego, Mary Krista y yo comenzamos a trabajar juntos y empezamos a trabajar juntos y las calcomanías comunitarias en realidad brindan pizza una vez al mes para que los estudiantes entren gratis. Así que ahora no solo les estamos dando espacio libre para que vengan y hagan lo que quieran y ese espacio seguro, sino que también están recibiendo pizza. Y ha sido muy popular. Así que grita a América.

Bien. Aquí hay otra cosa también, que estamos, ya sabes, nuevamente, tratando de unir a esa comunidad. Tenemos en agosto de 2021, implementamos nuestro programa de escala móvil de tarifas. Esto reemplazó nuestro programa anterior de reducción de tarifas. Nuevamente, tratar de servir de manera equitativa a todos los miembros de la comunidad básicamente hizo que el descuento se aplicara a casi todo menos a una lección privada. Entonces puede usar este descuento para una membresía de fitness. Puede usar este descuento para clases de natación, clases de kárate, siempre que no sea privado. Pero cualquiera de nuestros pases de programación o acondicionamiento físico puede usar esta membresía porque básicamente funciona y está disponible para todos los residentes de Park City dentro del distrito escolar. Y básicamente funciona en una escala basada en los ingresos y el tamaño del hogar. Entonces, básicamente, lo que hace es enviar la solicitud, enviar el ingreso anual de su hogar y luego puede calificar para cualquier lugar entre un 30 o un 70% de descuento en programas y pases. Nuevamente, dependiendo de cuál sea el ingreso de su hogar. Y la razón por la que hacemos esto es porque no queremos excluir a nadie. Queremos asegurarnos de que haya la menor cantidad posible de barreras de entrada a la recreación. Entonces, de nuevo, darles a todos el mismo acceso a estos a nosotros como personas a nuestros programas en nuestras instalaciones como podamos. Queremos asegurarnos de no excluir a nadie. Usted sabe, queremos asegurarnos de que servimos a la comunidad en su conjunto y de manera equitativa. Muy bien, entonces, una especie de panorama general. Ahora quiero tratar de hablar un poco sobre lo que significa la recreación para mí y lo que veo en este proceso general, así que no quiero que ustedes no tengan que hacerlo si solo quieren lanzar algunas cosas en el chat, pero mira estas fotos y dime lo que ves. O simplemente puedes lanzarlo en el chat. Puede escribir respuestas de una palabra. Ya sabes, sea lo que sea, pero un par de cosas que sabes, para notar, ¿verdad? Tengo una niña pequeña jugando al fútbol realmente linda. Parece que tenemos algún tipo de evento de natación. Algo está pasando aquí en el parque de patinaje, tal vez algunos niños enseñando a otros más pequeños. Y luego tenemos una gran foto del patio de recreo. Telaraña del patio de recreo con uno de nuestros consejeros de campamento en la casa rodante, están sentados encima de esa pieza del patio de recreo. Vientre flop a punto de suceder, pero realmente unión. Sí, Luis, eso es exactamente lo que busco. Mary Christa alegría y exploración. Sí. Así que realmente, si quieres profundizar en esto, voy a empezar aquí con la imagen del fútbol. Pero no sé si alguien alguna vez ha tenido hijos en nuestro programa de fútbol o lo ha hecho. Pero eso es realmente todos los sábados de primavera u otoño, cuando tenemos fútbol juvenil de primavera o fútbol juvenil de otoño. Ese es un lugar de conexión comunitaria. Es un lugar donde tenemos entrenadores voluntarios, tenemos árbitros voluntarios. Tenemos familias que se reúnen para ver a sus hijos participar, lo llamamos ya sabes, el grupo de niños, perseguiré la pelota, porque en realidad no es fútbol. Es solo un grupo de cinco o seis niños, de seis años, persiguiendo una pelota de fútbol por el campo. Pero es un placer, ¿verdad? es unión. Hablamos mucho sobre básicamente cómo, sabes cuando eres padre de alguien de esta edad. La mayoría de tus amigos son padres con hijos de la misma edad. Así que eso también se convierte en tiempo social para mamá y papá, en el campo viendo a sus hijos jugar al fútbol. Entonces, de nuevo, todo para la conexión comunitaria. Esa foto con todos esos niños patinando en patineta, organizamos algunos campamentos y clínicas de patineta. Y realmente lo que es tan bueno de este programa es con nuestro skatepark, queremos que sea un espacio seguro, como lo tenemos aquí en la marca. A diferencia del fútbol o la piscina, ya sabes, algunos padres tal vez tengan miedo de dejar a sus hijos solos en el parque de patinaje. Ya sabes, conocen el campamento de fútbol y conocen el campo de fútbol. No están tan seguros del parque de patinaje. Con los programas de parques de patinaje, queremos poder deshacernos de ese estereotipo de parque de patinaje, podrías decir y decir que sabes lo que hago, me siento cómodo dejando a mi hijo en el parque de patinaje. La gente allí es excelente. Hay gente que es muy agradable. Y sé que mis hijos estarán a salvo allí. Entonces, con nuestros campamentos y clínicas de patinetas, nuevamente, tratamos de incluir ese parque de patinaje, ese espacio como esa conexión comunitaria comunitaria.

Y finalmente, con nuestro consejero de campamento en nuestra casa rodante allí en la parte superior, solo quería conversar un poco y entrar en detalles sobre, ya sabes, nuestro personal, nuevamente, volviendo a las personas en nuestra declaración de misión . Y realmente lo que somos y lo que hacemos. Hay alrededor de 12 de nosotros a tiempo completo aquí en el MARC que estamos en recreación. Y los 12 contratamos alrededor de 250 empleados de temporada en el verano. Así que todo, desde consejeros de campamento hasta socorristas, instructores de apoyo, árbitros, todo eso. Y realmente lo que predicamos a nuestro personal es que no es solo un trabajo de verano. No es solo un trabajo de salvavidas. No es solo el primer trabajo para muchos de los niños que contratamos, es su primer trabajo. Y es más que eso. Es mucho más que eso. Así que básicamente de lo que hablamos es de que somos más que consejeros de campamento. Somos más que árbitros. Tenemos control sobre muchos de los niños, dejamos una huella en ellos. Somos mentores. Y podemos, Nathan habló mucho sobre esa experiencia infantil positiva, podemos hacer o deshacer esa experiencia. Muchas veces al final del verano, muchos de los niños con los que trabajamos nos admiran. Así que nosotros somos esos mentores, esos adultos de confianza. Y nos vamos con suerte, ya sea solo por el verano o por 30 años, nos vamos, ya sabes, entendiendo el impacto que tenemos en la vida de un niño. Ya sabes, salimos capacitados en RCP y primeros auxilios que tratamos, estamos capacitados en QPR nuevamente, Mary Christa y el departamento de salud del condado de Suffolk trabajan con nosotros para capacitar a nuestro personal allí. Y estamos capacitados en protección juvenil, así que para estar atentos a lo que vemos o lo que potencialmente podemos ver, saben que podríamos necesitar esto para decir algo sobre el entrenamiento para estar atentos a ese tipo de cosas. Entonces, de nuevo, mirando hacia atrás, ya sabes, los niños que contratamos, el personal que contratamos, todos haciendo, con suerte, haciendo de nuestra comunidad un lugar mejor, un lugar mejor y un lugar más seguro. Mi historia es muy rápida, solo concluiré con esto, nací y me crié aquí en Park City, y conseguí un trabajo en nuestro campamento de verano como consejero en la escuela secundaria, creo que fue hace 14 o 15 años. antiguo. Y en ese momento, ya sabes, solo dije: Oh, es un trabajo de verano. Es un trabajo divertido que puedo hacer durante el verano y puedo jugar con los niños todo el día. Y suena realmente genial. Y entre más comencé a regresar cada verano, dije, Oh, Dios mío, creo que probablemente podría hacer esto como una carrera, dije, Por qué no, sería genial, puedo trabajar donde otros la gente juega, puedo tener un impacto en la comunidad, puedo tener un impacto en estos niños. Y, ya sabes, he aquí que aquí estoy, bastantes años después, ahora trabajando a tiempo completo en el trabajo que comencé. Para la misma organización en la que he estado trabajando ahora, básicamente toda mi vida. Tan genial. Y luego, realmente, lo mismo ocurre con algunos de nuestros otros empleados, todos comenzamos en un papel de medio tiempo, Kid influyente. Entonces, la mayoría de nosotros comenzamos en un campamento de verano, donde, ya sabes, hemos subido la escalera per se para llegar a donde estamos. Pero realmente, una vez más, el panorama más amplio cuando la recreación cuando mucha gente ve la recreación, ven, ya sabes, el próximo programa deportivo, o ven el lugar donde van a hacer ejercicio, o donde van a jugar al mediodía y al baloncesto o tenis. Pero realmente, tratamos de esforzarnos por ir más allá de esa primera capa que conoces al juzgar un libro por su portada. Y tratamos de ser más que más que eso tratamos de estar arraigados en la comunidad comprometidos con la comunidad. Y nos esforzamos por esa conexión comunitaria. Así que muchas gracias, Mary. Christa, gracias por el tiempo y la oportunidad. Yo también me quedaré para cualquier pregunta o pensamiento que surja.

Mary Christa Smith  
Dios mío, muchas gracias, Cole, tú y yo hemos hablado muchas veces. Y he aprendido mucho de usted durante los años que ha estado involucrado con Communities That Care. Pero hoy aprendí mucho más sobre la intencionalidad de lo que está haciendo dentro de Park City Recreation para fomentar la conexión con la comunidad y que se encuentra debajo y a través de toda su programación, sus iniciativas, cómo capacita a su personal, me encanta ver que volver a capacitar a su personal y cómo ser mentores y cómo cuidar a los niños y darse cuenta si es necesario abordar algo. Así que somos muy afortunados de tener su liderazgo en la marca. Y en nuestra comunidad. Gracias. Quiero pasar el tiempo ahora a Hailee Hernandez del Christian Center para hablar sobre su trabajo y especialmente el voluntariado y el trabajo a través del Christian Center que también fomenta la conexión comunitaria. Así que Hailee, llévatela.

Hailee Hernandez  
Muchísimas gracias. Déjame seguir adelante y compartir mi diapositiva. Bien. Gracias chicos, por acompañarme hoy. Soy el voluntario interino y el Coordinador de Programas, así como el Coordinador de Datos de asistencia para necesidades básicas para el Centro Cristiano de Park City. Así que primero voy a hablar un poco sobre el voluntariado. Entonces, el voluntariado ha sido un gran sector en Estados Unidos durante mucho tiempo. Todos sabemos eso. Pero cuando golpeó COVID, hubo un impacto inmenso en el sector sin fines de lucro. Después del golpe de COVID, bajamos a tener solo una de cada cinco y una de cada tres mujeres que eran voluntarias. Y esto es una disminución en la participación. No puedo recordar exactamente cuál fue, pero es una disminución y la probabilidad de que las mujeres sean más parte de la comunidad y el voluntariado también es una tendencia común. Pero luego también hicimos una investigación sobre cuál es el impacto de los voluntarios. Así que una hora de voluntariado vale $28.54. Ahora, si piensas en el nivel de educación, la pasión, todo lo que estos voluntarios aportan, esto es a lo que equivale ese pago. Ya sabes, no solo están clasificando las cosas, sino que lo están haciendo con intención. Hay una razón por la que vienen aquí. Y, y es igual a eso. Otra cosa que se dio es que más gente estaba en casa y tenía disponibilidad para ser voluntario de diferentes formas. Entonces eso me hizo Poder dar tutoría en línea a través de COVID, en lugar de hacerlo en persona, u ofrecer clases, talleres en línea que antes no se hacían comúnmente en línea, esa es otra forma de voluntariado que exploramos. Y, por último, el voluntariado no es solo un evento específico en el que te inscribes, o que tienes que hacer con un grupo, puede ser algo tan pequeño como ir a palear la nieve de tu vecino en su jardín o comprarles comestibles, controlarlos. , asegurándose de que su despensa esté abastecida, o lo que sea, alguien tiene COVID, ya sabes, asegurándose de que tengan todo lo que necesitan, alguien sale de la ciudad, asegurándose de que su casa esté bien cuidada simplemente siendo parte de la comunidad . Y luego, una cosa que es realmente beneficiosa con el voluntariado es que ayuda a estos voluntarios a perfeccionar sus habilidades específicas. Entonces, dentro del Christian Center, una cosa que traté de hacer es, ya sabes, no tenemos un trabajo que cumpla con lo que los voluntarios buscan hacer, confiemos en qué habilidades y atributos tienen que están dispuestos para ser voluntario. Entonces, si tenemos un recién graduado, que hizo trabajo de mercadeo, y quiere ser voluntario, pero no tiene tiempo para venir al centro a hacer trabajo físico. Hagamos que, ya sabes, hagan algunos folletos para nosotros. Hagamos algunas conexiones de marketing con ellos. Veamos cómo podemos utilizar mejor su servicio y sus habilidades.

Así que en el Centro Cristiano, tenemos dos centros. Tenemos uno en Park City que sirve al condado de Summit. Luego también tenemos el centro Heber que sirve al condado de Wasatch. Entonces, cada centro tiene una tienda de segunda mano y una boutique, así como una despensa de alimentos. Lo mejor de las tiendas boutique y de segunda mano es que proporcionan el 40 % de los fondos para nuestros programas. Entonces, nuestros programas son mucho de la palabra detrás de escena, pero gran parte de la comunidad no ve que uno de los programas que hacemos es nuestro programa de asistencia para necesidades básicas. Por lo tanto, la asistencia para necesidades básicas es la gestión de casos para personas de bajos ingresos o personas sin hogar. Hay algunas lagunas en los servicios sociales dentro de Summit y el condado de Wasatch. Y nuestro equipo de asistencia para necesidades básicas hace todo lo posible para satisfacer esas necesidades, con fondos para brindarles servicios. Entonces, un ejemplo de brechas en los servicios. Un individuo estaba trabajando como fabricante de nieve para esta temporada, y se le proporcionó vivienda con su trabajo. Se lesionó y ya no pudo contribuir con la cantidad de trabajo que necesitaba con su lesión, lo que también resultó en que perdiera su trabajo y su vivienda. Nuestro equipo de asistencia para necesidades básicas pudo conseguirle un hotel. Y luego hicieron un trabajo de gestión de casos con él hablando sobre las conexiones que tiene dentro de la comunidad y dentro de su familia y sus amigos y sus redes. Y tenía una conexión con un administrador de casos en la VOA. Así que hablamos con su administrador de casos en la VOA y pudo prestarle un vehículo porque no tenía vehículo. Y luego también pudimos ponerlo en contacto con su familia y comprar un boleto de autobús. Así pudo pasar las vacaciones con su familia. Así que gran parte de eso se pagó a través de fondos que llegaron a través de nuestra tienda de segunda mano en nuestra boutique. Entonces, cuando va a la boutique Arthur Strong, está haciendo mucho más por la comunidad que quizás ni siquiera sepa cuando compra artículos que son oportunidades de voluntariado dentro del Christian Center. Así que tenemos nuestra boutique y tienda de segunda mano donde nuestros voluntarios revisan la ropa, ayudan a los participantes o ayudan a los compradores a encontrar lo que están buscando. Una cosa realmente importante por la que nuestras tiendas de teca de segunda mano son comúnmente conocidas es nuestro equipo de snowboard y nuestros esquís aquí. Así que mucha gente viene y dona su equipo después de la temporada. Y a la gente le encanta venir y encontrar grandes ofertas en equipos poco usados. Y así tenemos algunos amantes del esquí y del snowboard que vienen y les encanta ser voluntarios y hablar con la gente sobre el equipo que están comprando. Ayúdalos a superarlo. Sabes, para mí, yo no era muy conocido. No sabía tablas, no sabía esquís y realmente no sabía mucho sobre fijaciones. Y cuando fui allí para que un voluntario me ayudara, fue increíble y me ayudó no solo a encontrar el equipo adecuado, sino también a qué senderos ir al día siguiente y cuál era el mejor lugar para mí como nuevo principiante. Entonces, no solo estaba ofreciendo su tiempo como voluntario, sino que también podía hablar sobre algo que le apasiona, el snowboard, y estar en la montaña y conectarse con personas de la comunidad. Nuestra despensa de alimentos sirve a todo el condado de Summit y Wasatch, trabajamos junto con las tiendas de comestibles locales para rescatar comestibles. Y con nuestro rescate de comestibles, también tenemos algunas oportunidades para que los miembros de nuestra comunidad vayan a buscar comida para nosotros. Entonces, si un voluntario no puede cumplir con nuestros tiempos de abastecimiento de la despensa, y salimos y reabastecemos todos los estantes, y quiere tener un horario más regular y ser voluntario con nosotros, pero no puede comprometerse con los tiempos que tenemos, podemos trabajar con ellos para ser socios en nuestro rescate de comestibles. Eso implicaría que el voluntario lleve su vehículo a la tienda de comestibles, se reúna con el gerente de la tienda, recoja los comestibles y luego los entregue a nuestra despensa para que más voluntarios clasifiquen y coloquen en los estantes los productos y otros comestibles.

Ese tipo de voluntariado te pone en contacto profundo con la comunidad, estás trabajando con todos los que entran por la puerta, saludándolos y asegurándote de que tengan lo que necesitan. Y solo haciéndoles saber sobre otros servicios, como nuestro programa de asistencia para necesidades básicas, ya sabes, si alguien viene a comprar comestibles, es posible que tampoco pueda pagar, ya sabes, su factura de calefacción, su factura de agua, y podemos ayudarlos con ese tipo de necesidades. Ya sabes, es dar la mano y saber que no solo Christian Center, los empleados, sino también los voluntarios, las personas dentro de su comunidad se preocupan por usted. Y quieren asegurarse de que se satisfagan sus necesidades. Otra forma en que nos enfocamos en encontrar personas en su punto de necesidad, que es nuestra declaración de misión, es haciendo despensas móviles de alimentos. Entonces, con nuestras despensas de alimentos móviles, tenemos voluntarios para ayudar a cargar nuestro remolque con productos agrícolas y otros artículos necesarios para las personas de la comunidad. Y luego tenemos un grupo diferente de voluntarios que conducirán sus vehículos a los sitios en los que estamos, se encontrarán con nosotros allí y ayudarán a instalar la despensa donde está la gente. Entonces, esto significa ir a apartamentos de viviendas asequibles o tal vez a áreas rurales y la comunidad que puede no tener el mejor transporte público para llegar a nuestras despensas de alimentos, reunirse con ellos allí y asegurarse de que se atiendan sus necesidades y que sus familias tengan los alimentos. para comer esa noche. Hicimos esto la semana pasada. Y tuvimos 43 familias que vinieron a través de nuestra despensa móvil de alimentos y pudimos asegurarnos de que tuvieran excelentes comidas en la mesa esa noche. Otra oportunidad de voluntariado que tenemos es la limpieza de las instalaciones, y la limpieza de las instalaciones contribuye no solo a garantizar que nuestras instalaciones estén limpias y se vean bien, sino también a un sentido de comunidad y a asegurarse de que las áreas generales dentro de nuestra comunidad se vean bien y estén cuidar de cualquiera tiene algo de orgullo en eso, ya sabes. Y luego nuestra última oportunidad de voluntariado es nuestro alcance de reserva de tiro. Así que trabajamos con la tribu Go Shoot para asegurarnos de que se satisfagan sus necesidades. Y eso incluye traer comida de nuestras despensas que quizás no puedan conseguir fácilmente en la reserva. Además, creemos que dos veces al año hacemos grandes proyectos de servicio con ellos. Entonces, en este momento, una de sus necesidades en la reserva es limpiar algunas pilas de chatarra. Así que vamos a trabajar juntos para que diferentes voluntarios de nuestra comunidad trabajen juntos para ir a limpiar la pila de chatarra. Esto es conocer a las personas en su punto de necesidad y diversificar a las personas con las que nos reunimos. Entonces, no solo nos reunimos con personas en Park City en el sur del condado de Wasatch, sino que las personas que alguna vez fueron indígenas de esta tierra, las personas que continúan orando por agua o sus antepasados ​​​​vinieron a esta tierra, debemos reconocerlos. y trabajar con ellos y asegurarse de que también se satisfagan sus necesidades. Ese es uno de nuestros principales objetivos dentro del trabajo voluntario de CCPC y cómo el voluntariado se conecta con los objetivos del contexto social y comunitario.

Entonces, cuando te reúnes con personas que quizás no veas regularmente, si estás trabajando en tu oficina, estás haciendo esas amistades, esas conexiones y, para mí, vengo de un origen mexicano-estadounidense y de bajos ingresos. Realmente nunca sentí que era bienvenido en muchas esferas. Y también es muy intimidante hablar con personas fuera de tus círculos sociales. Entonces, venir a una despensa de alimentos y tener esa accesibilidad para hablar con personas en diferentes esferas y diferentes comunidades con las que quizás no se reúna regularmente, le da un sentido más amplio de comunidad y realmente lo hace sentir que les importa, quieren para saber cómo estás, ya sabes, cuando vienes todos los días, o una vez a la semana a la despensa para sacar las necesidades de tu familia, ya sabes, empiezan a saber quién es tu familia, empiezan a ver quiénes son tus hijas son, saludarlos y preguntarles cómo estuvo ese partido de fútbol este fin de semana. Y solo crea ese sentido de comunidad que no estaba allí originalmente debido a quizás los límites o simplemente el contexto social general de que es posible que no tenga contacto con esas personas dentro de nuestras oportunidades de voluntariado para poder tener oportunidades en el voluntariado para jóvenes y niños. . Entonces, hace aproximadamente dos semanas, tuvimos nuestro proyecto masivo de huevos de pascua en el que implicó crear 1500 canastas de Pascua para ambas comunidades en Summit y el condado de Wasatch. Así que teníamos, creo que eran 60 voluntarios en nuestro espacio de reunión. Y eso incluía edades de cuatro a 70 años. Lo cual es muy raro entrar en una habitación, especialmente con tanta gente, pero pudimos hacerlo. Teníamos pizza, teníamos música, teníamos risas Teníamos oraciones. Era algo que no sucede regularmente. Y es que está celebrando la temporada con gente que normalmente no. Y realmente ayudó a los niños a ver cómo pueden conectarse con otras personas en la comunidad para beneficiar a todos. Por último, dentro de nuestra despensa de alimentos, nos hemos movido recientemente para reorganizarla para tener productos como principal frente. Y estamos trabajando con algunos médicos en el área para promover estilos de vida más saludables y un mejor acceso a formas de cocinar comidas de manera económica que también sean nutritivas. Así que también estamos trabajando con el departamento de policía de Park City para tomar un café con un policía. Entonces, el oficial Franco viene una vez al mes para reunirse con nuestra comunidad porque lo que muchos miembros del departamento de policía han notado es que están respondiendo llamadas que no necesariamente necesitan ser respondidas, y probablemente podrían haberse mitigado antes con un poco de educación Entonces, con el oficial Franco viniendo a nuestra despensa de alimentos para conocer a nuestra clientela, estamos ofreciendo esa pieza educativa, esa pieza de comodidad y poder responder preguntas que tal vez no se sientan cómodos porque él está en un espacio en el que se reúne con ellos donde son. Y le pedimos que cuando venga se vista más informal para que no sea tan intimidante o traumatizante. Para algunas personas en nuestra comunidad. La policía puede tener una connotación negativa. Pero estamos tratando de cerrar esa brecha y asegurarnos de que todos en la comunidad trabajen juntos para ayudarse mutuamente. Y para eso estamos todos aquí. Derecha. Esa es mi presentación, voy a cerrar con una cita de Dorothy Height. Sin el servicio a la comunidad, no tendríamos una calidad de vida sólida, es importante que la persona que atiende así como la que lo recibe, es la forma en que nosotros mismos crecemos y nos desarrollamos. Gracias.

Mary Christa Smith  
Hailee, muchas gracias por compartir el trabajo que se está realizando en el Centro Cristiano. Y bienvenido a su papel interino. Y gracias por todo lo que hace por nuestra comunidad y por contar no solo la historia del Centro Cristiano, sino también su propia historia personal. Te lo agradezco. Entonces, amigos, nos quedan unos 15 minutos y tenemos a nuestros panelistas aquí, Nathan Cole, Hailee y Joey, quienes están aquí y disponibles para responder sus preguntas. Y siéntase libre de incluirlos en el chat o ponerlos en la sección de preguntas y respuestas. Vi una pregunta antes, nuestros panelistas realmente no tienen acceso para escribir preguntas. Entonces vino de Joey Thurgood sobre las oportunidades de recreación en el condado de Eastern Summit, las partes más rurales y me pregunto Cole, ¿tiene información sobre lo que podría estar disponible en Colville y Kamus?

Cole Johnston  
Sí, puedo hacer mi mejor esfuerzo, lo hago. Entonces, South Summit a South Summit tiene un pequeño departamento de recreación en Kamus con el que trabajan en estrecha colaboración con el distrito escolar allí. Así que en realidad supervisan el Centro Acuático South Summit, que es esa piscina cubierta y luego hay un gimnasio allí. Son mucho más pequeños. Ejecutan un par de programas al año, creo que son solo dos o tres empleados de tiempo completo. Así que sé que hay opciones allí. i Para ser honesto, no tengo detalles específicos sobre los programas. Y luego, no creo que North Summit tenga un departamento de recreación o sé que se habló de algo, como un club comunitario para organizar ese tipo de cosas. Pero que yo sepa, no creo que Kobo lo haya hecho. Oh, tienen un Distrito de Recreación. Está bien, genial. Ahí vas. Pero sí, como dije, sé muy poco. Asi que.

Mary Christa Smith  
Gracias. Gracias Melina. Entonces, en el chat, puede ver a Melina Stevens, quien está en nuestro Consejo del Condado de Summit, dice que North Summit tiene un Distrito de Recreación y están en el proceso de construir más campos para programas recreativos para adultos y niños. Así que gracias por agregar eso aquí también. ¿Sabes si tienen una tarifa de escala móvil? Yo no. Solía vivir en Kamus. Y han pasado probablemente cinco años desde que viví allí. No recuerdo una tarifa de escala móvil en el Fitness and Aquatic Center. Pero no puedo hablar de eso definitivamente. ¿Alguna otra pregunta o comentario? ¿Sentirse libre? Si sabe si no tiene una pregunta, pero si tiene un comentario, siéntase libre de incluirlo en la sección de preguntas y respuestas o también en el chat.

Joey Thurgood  
Tengo una pregunta para Nathan, simplemente pensando un poco sobre el acceso a oportunidades en un condado tan amplio donde hay algunas áreas que están un poco más pobladas que otras palabras, otras como en el norte y el este. . Nathan, ¿hay más altos? ¿Cuándo miramos el aislamiento social? ¿Vemos respaldo para niveles más altos de aislamiento social en áreas más rurales y fronterizas para los adolescentes? ¿O eso se mantiene bastante estable en todo el estado?

Nathan Malan  
no tengo ese dato Es complicado con nuestra evaluación de las necesidades provinciales, porque podemos ver los datos agregados del estado. Y cuando desglosas las cosas, incluso si los diferentes niveles tenemos que obtener permisos de los diferentes distritos escolares para ver esos datos. Y, por lo tanto, si analizamos solo los distritos rurales versus los más urbanos, actualmente no es posible, no lo sé. Todavía estamos tratando de averiguar la mejor manera de hacer un análisis con estos datos. Y hay esfuerzos en este momento porque sé que hay al menos otro epidemiólogo en el grupo que sí funciona. Tenemos IBIS, donde hay todo tipo de datos de salud específicos de Utah. Y obtendremos la evaluación de las necesidades de prevención de los datos de la Encuesta de jóvenes en IBIS, donde podrán ver las diferencias estadísticas y todo. Actualmente hay una herramienta para ver los datos agregados de todo el estado. Pero en esa herramienta, no puedes ver la significación estadística. Y no puedes desglosar las cosas por geografía en absoluto.

Joey Thurgood  
Entonces, Nathan, si algunos de estos distritos escolares o municipios más pequeños vinieran a usted y quisieran ver eso un poco más de cerca, y tuviera su opinión y su cooperación, ¿podría brindarles una mirada más cercana? ?

Nathan Malan  
Sí, creo que, sí, es que les dan sus datos específicos al distrito escolar, para que puedan hacer lo que quieran con esos datos. Entonces, sí, si el condado de Summit quiere trabajar con sus distritos escolares, puede buscar un análisis específico, según tengo entendido, esos datos son específicos de sus distritos escolares.

Mary Christa Smith  
Tengo curiosidad por Joey y Nathan, desde una perspectiva estatal, cuando se trata de fomentar las conexiones sociales. ¿Tiene ejemplos en su trabajo de comunidades que están haciendo un muy buen trabajo al abordar este factor de protección en particular y cómo lo están haciendo?

Joey Thurgood  
Bueno, solo un par de cosas que se me ocurren, diría que hay algunos grupos demográficos diferentes en el área del condado de Salt Lake que hacen un muy buen trabajo sobre la cultura dentro de sus culturas, creando conexión. Eso se ve mucho en las comunidades poliamorosas. Otro ejemplo sería dentro de las comunidades de habla hispana. La escuela Guadalupe es una escuela chárter en el área de Rose Park, Glendale, que ofrece más que solo educación: brindan inglés como segundo idioma después de la escuela, brindan capacitación laboral, brindan cuidado de niños y En cierto modo, han creado un pequeño centro para su comunidad para ayudarlos a acceder a apoyos realmente concretos en, ya sabes, solicitar empleos y cosas por el estilo. Pero luego también hay cosas que brindan que son como grupos de mamás que pueden reunirse y hablar sobre cosas de mamá, ya sabes, grupos de apoyo y cosas como esta, eso, ya sabes, en una comunidad donde, donde todos, ya sabes, casi experimentando cosas similares. Entonces, hay algunas comunidades, creo que y esto es algo que no noté, ya que estábamos haciendo nuestra parte de la presentación, pero el Programa de Prevención de Violencia y Lesiones está en proceso ahora mismo de construir lo que se va a llamar la campaña juntos hablamos. Y que juntos, la campaña you can you talk se centrará únicamente en mejorar los factores de protección para los habitantes de Utah, se centrará mucho en aumentar la conexión y reducir el estigma en torno a la búsqueda de ayuda y luego las vías para buscar ayuda. Entonces, a nivel estatal, estamos tratando de inculcar en las comunidades locales, ya sabes, la importancia de asumir este manto, si quieren comunidades fuertes, dentro de sus ciudades y pueblos, que tienen que tomar un papel muy activo en eso. Podemos hacer muchas cosas a nivel estatal y hacer muchas recomendaciones, pero eso no necesariamente se filtrará hasta que obtenga un campeón a nivel local que lo tome y realmente lo implemente. Así que estamos felices de apoyar cualquier área local que quiera avanzar en esta área. Y esperamos que esa campaña juntos en Utah sea un catalizador para eso. Pero en cuanto a los esfuerzos locales, creo que los esfuerzos locales están más conectados con los grupos de la iglesia y los grupos religiosos y culturales que en términos generales. Hay tanto sí, sí y no. Pero creo que el intento de cada comunidad de mejorar la conectividad se ve diferente, porque la demografía de cada comunidad es diferente, las necesidades de cada comunidad son diferentes. Entonces, realmente tomará una especie de nivel básico, como reunir a esas personas y luego decir, ya sabes, mirar los datos que Nathan puede proporcionar, y decir, ¿dónde están nuestras áreas de preocupación y cómo los abordamos. Y, y luego construyendo a partir de ahí, pero escuchando lo que Hailee estaba hablando, lo que ella está haciendo a través de toda la iglesia u organización, pensé, esto es increíble, porque en mi vida personal, mi familia hace mucho para ayudar a los vagabundos. Y, y las personas que recientemente están siendo reubicadas, y hemos hablado sobre una especie de situación de ahorro para tratar de mantener ese esfuerzo para traer un poco de dinero extra, pero también para eliminar las donaciones que recibimos que no son No es realmente útil para la población a la que atendemos. Pero creo que solo se necesita un campeón para comenzar. Y nosotros, a nivel estatal, estamos felices de proporcionar el tipo de sustancia y la ciencia para sustentarlo, pero y ser de apoyo, pero realmente solo se necesita un campeón a nivel local.

Mary Christa Smith  
Muchas gracias, Joey. No veo ninguna pregunta o comentario en el chat. Adelante, Natán.

Nathan Malan  
Solo voy a saltar también. Otro buen ejemplo, específicamente al mirar nuestros datos, donde vemos que las personas LGBTQ se identifican como más aisladas socialmente y creo que las cosas las rodean en Provo, que llega a la comunidad LGBT allí. Es solo para adultos, es lo que entendemos por 18 Plus, pero creo que cosas como esa, como identificar a las comunidades en mayor riesgo y brindarles lugares donde puedan reunirse y obtener el apoyo que necesitan es muy, muy importante. . Así que ese es otro buen ejemplo.

Joey Thurgood  
Definitivamente dentro de un espacio culturalmente competente, y creo que eso es algo de lo que debemos tener mucho cuidado cuando estamos tratando de construir una conexión es que somos solo ese viejo adagio no para nosotros sin nosotros. Queremos asegurarnos de que todos los servicios que se brinden para construir la conexión comunitaria sean culturalmente apropiados.

Mary Christa Smith  
Gracias. Soy consciente de que. Pensé que toda la historia sobre preguntarles a los niños qué querían y necesitaban era un maravilloso ejemplo de Nada sobre nosotros sin nosotros. Quería señalar a nuestros residentes del condado de Summit. Enviaremos esto en el seguimiento de este seminario web para aquellos de ustedes que se han registrado, pero el Departamento de Salud del Comportamiento del Condado de Summit realizó una encuesta, creo que hace aproximadamente un año, era para adultos. Pero hay indicadores dentro de la encuesta sobre la conexión de la comunidad. Entonces, dentro de su organización, si se pregunta cómo es la conexión social en el condado de Summit, Utah, le indicaría la encuesta y me aseguraré de incluirla. Y está desglosado por género, edad, ingresos y raza. Por lo tanto, creo que puede ser una herramienta realmente útil para descubrir cómo dirigirse a una población en particular. Entonces fue en 2021, que se realizó la encuesta. Tienen indicadores aquí sobre la soledad, y hablan sobre las preguntas que se hacen al respecto. También está desglosado por código postal. Para personas que indican que están experimentando altos índices de soledad. Hablan de amistades, hablan de conexión comunitaria e identidad. Por lo tanto, no repasaré toda la encuesta con usted. Pero tenemos algunos datos locales realmente buenos. Y de nuevo, eso es para adultos, no para jóvenes y, al punto de Nathan, la encuesta de Sharpe es nuestra encuesta Keystone para jóvenes en lo que respecta a la salud del comportamiento, el uso de sustancias para la salud mental. Es una encuesta muy importante. Así que espero que nuestra comunidad pueda brindar un gran apoyo a nuestros esfuerzos continuos para tener una participación sólida en esa encuesta. Solo estoy mirando el chat. Y veo que Kristen ha puesto aquí muchas cosas sucediendo en un nivel mucho más profundo para socavar todos estos increíbles e increíbles esfuerzos. Y les impide trabajar tan bien como les gustaría explorar más profundamente en algún momento. Gracias, Kristen, veo tu chat aquí también, si quieres poner tu información de contacto, y me complace conectarme contigo después del seminario web. Si no hay más preguntas, y no veo ninguna pregunta en las preguntas y respuestas o en el chat, solo quiero agradecer a Nathan, Joey, Cole y Hailee por su tiempo hoy para brindar esta importante información. Nuevamente, enviaremos notas de seguimiento para todos los que se hayan registrado y se publicarán en nuestro sitio web si desea recomendarlo a sus colegas en el futuro. Y estoy muy agradecido de que aporte su experiencia en el mundo de la prevención. Sabemos que trabajar a través de la colaboración organizacional es que cada uno de nosotros tiene una pieza del rompecabezas de lo que se necesita para crear una comunidad saludable donde nuestros jóvenes puedan prosperar. Y cada uno de nosotros tiene un papel que desempeñar, ya sea como abuelos, vecinos, líderes de la iglesia, recreación, entrenadores de natación, lo que sea, todos podemos desempeñar un papel en esto. Y lo que también aprecio acerca de los determinantes sociales de la salud es que pueden ayudarnos a mirar a través de la organización en nuestros factores de riesgo y protección compartidos y encontrar formas en las que podemos compartir recursos y apoyarnos unos a otros. Así que gracias a todos ustedes por su experiencia, su tiempo y su participación son los siguientes. Esta es una serie de cinco partes. Todavía no hemos seleccionado la fecha para nuestro próximo seminario web, pero les enviaré un correo electrónico a todos ustedes cuando se llevará a cabo. Y se centra en el entorno construido del vecindario y estará relacionado con problemas relacionados con la accesibilidad para peatones, el transporte y la vivienda, que también es un tema clave en nuestra comunidad. Así que gracias a todos ustedes. Espero que tengas un maravilloso día hoy. Gracias a todos los que han escuchado y se han tomado el tiempo de su martes por la mañana para estar aquí con nosotros.

Upcoming Events

Translate »