Mental Health Mondays with Dr. Emily Kline

Jul 8, 2022 | CTC Blog, Mental Health Mondays

Dr. Emily Kline is a clinical psychologist an assistant professor of psychiatry at Boston University School of Medicine. She serves as the Director of Psychological Services for the Wellness and Recovery After Psychosis team and leads the Motivational Interviewing for Loved Ones lab at Boston Medical Center. Her research focuses on early course psychosis, adolescent and young adult mental health, and parent-focused interventions.

Dr. Kline is the author of The School of Hard Talks: How to Have Real Conversations with Your (Almost Grown) Kids and the creator of The School of Hard Talks Online. She has published dozens of articles appearing in a range of peer-reviewed scholarly journals, textbooks, and popular magazines, and she has spoken with audiences all over the world about mental health and interpersonal communication.

Dr. Kline completed her bachelor’s degree at Haverford College, her master’s and doctoral degrees at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, and her clinical and post-doctoral training at Harvard Medical School. She lives in Boston with her family.

From this discussion:

 

Jessica Crate
Hello everyone and welcome to our mental health Mondays a Communities That Care video podcast discussing mental health. I am Jessica Crate Oveson, the visionary spokeswoman for CTC Summit County. And at CTC, our vision is truly a world of connection, vitality and wellbeing where kids and families thrive. Our mission is to collaboratively improve the lives of youth and families by fostering a culture of health through prevention. And at CTC, we have a saying that connection is prevention. And in the spirit of community connection, we are delighted to have Dr. Emily Kline with us today. Dr. Emily comes to us with an impressive bio. She’s a clinical psychologist, and Assistant Professor of Psychiatry at Boston University School of Medicine. She serves as the Director of psychological services for the wellness and recovery after psychosis team and leads the motivational interviewing for loved ones lab at Boston Medical Center. Her research focuses on early core psychosis, adolescent and young adult mental health and parent focused interventions. Dr. Kline is the author of one of my new favorite books, the School of Hard talks, how to have real conversations with your almost grown kids, and the creator of the School of Hard talks online. So we’ll be sure to include those links below. So check those out. She has published dozens of articles appearing in a range of peer reviewed scholarly journals, textbooks and popular magazines. And she has spoken with audiences all over the world about mental health and interpersonal communication. Dr. Kline has completed her bachelor’s degree at Haverford College, her master’s and doctoral degrees at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, and her clinical and postdoctoral training at Harvard Medical School. She lives in Boston with her family. And we are delighted to have her with us today. She’s presented over at a brace connection prevention summit in Utah, and blew us all away. So Dr. Emily, we are so excited to have you on with us today. Thank you for joining us. And let’s just start out you know, tell us a little bit more about yourself, you know, what you do your initiatives? And really why, why you got into this and love what you do?

Dr. Emily Kline
Yeah, well, thank you so much for having me. I love to talk about this stuff. So thrilled to just have this conversation with you. So I am a clinical psychologist, which means I studied psychology for a long time. And I worked at the university, which means that I kind of do a combination of treating patients in a clinic, teaching students and psychiatrists how to do good therapy. And then if I’m lucky, I get some time to do research, which means I get to figure out new ways to help families or go through our medical records and our data to figure out what works best for him. So it’s some point, you know, in combining all these roles, I do so much psychotherapy supervision, and then so much family psychotherapy. And those are not that different, actually, like I found myself having the exact same conversations with my students about how to communicate with their therapy clients that I was having with parents in family therapy about how to connect with their kids. And the more that I started to notice those parallels, I just thought this is something that we should formalize like we have all these great strategies that we teach our students and our doctors in clinic for helping connect with patients and encouraging them to make healthier changes and choices in their lives. Parents need to know this stuff, too. Right? So that’s what I’ve been doing the last couple of years is taking some of the curriculum that we use with therapy trainees, and actually translating that in in asking, How can this work for families?

Jessica Crate
Amazing. Well, you have done, you’ve done a lot of work not only through the years, but in working with individuals and now writing a book and working on programs. You know, talk to us a little bit more about what you do to to truly foster prevention and how does how do your initiatives do that? And really, what is your focus?

Dr. Emily Kline
So, um, as you said before, in my clinic, I actually work less in prevention in some sense and more, you know, what I call the deep end of mental health, you know, families that are already dealing with serious mental illness like psychotic disorders, mostly schizophrenia, severe bipolar disorder or drug induced psychosis. So that is not prevention. And yet, you know, the more I do that work, the more families tell me, this is information that I should have had a long time ago.

Jessica Crate
Right.

Dr. Emily Kline
So, you know, it’s really that kind of push from the families that I see in clinic. And it’s not like they caused their child’s mental illness. And in some sense, they probably couldn’t have prevented it a lot of the time, you know, these mental illnesses have a strong genetic component. But they could have prevented a lot of the pain and suffering,

Jessica Crate
Right.

Dr. Emily Kline
If they had been able to recognize what was going on and effectively get to the right place and say the right thing. And, and in some sense, you know, some mental illness can be prevented, you know, there’s depression and anxiety, we know is so, so prevalent among teens right now. And I think that a lot of that actually is preventable, through really strong family support and social connections.

Jessica Crate
Right. And speaking of that, you know, we talk a lot here on this podcast about community connection and fostering that, you know, from your experience, I have two questions that we’ll start with the first one, what role do you think community connectedness plays in our well being? And how have you, your your business, your initiatives contributed to the health and vitality of your clients, patients, people that you work with? What have you seen?

Dr. Emily Kline
Yeah, well, your first question, you know, how does community how does community contribute to well being? I think it’s really the fundamental building block in a lot of ways, you know, there’s so much research showing that we can get through a lot in terms of stressful or even traumatic experiences, if we have strong social support from family or friends. So there’s this, you know, relationship between stress and depression that you see in the literature, but that relationship is really strong for people who don’t have a strong connection to their community. And it’s actually pretty weak for people who do have a strong connection to their communities.

Jessica Crate
Interesting.

Dr. Emily Kline
So we have all this research that shows us that being connected, having strong friendships, feeling a sense of belonging, can prevent stress from leading to mental illness. And that’s kind of like on the research level, like the 10,000 foot view, in terms of what I actually see, you know, I, there’s, I think about kids who are at risk for mental illness, or who are already experiencing mental illness, as sort of this, this spectrum from kids who, like, have are having a tough year at school, maybe their best friend moved out of town, and they’re feeling really lonely. to kids who are like in the deep end, like I said, you know, they’re experiencing severe symptoms, they’re using drugs and alcohol to cope. But there is a continuum between those kids, you know, we can think of that as sort of a spectrum of, of suffering or of mental illness. And I think that for every spot along that continuum, connecting with someone can move you in the right direction. You know, so for that kid whose friend moved away, making one new friend or being invited to participate on a team, or in a club, or attending a family get together over the weekend with their cousins, it can really restore their sense of well being and belonging, and move them further away from that more deeper, severe end of that continuum. And even for someone who is really at the deep end, I see all the time, how a strong connection with parents strong connection with family, or preserving connections with friends that you had from before you got sick, or just somebody reaching out in a non judgmental way, just saying, Hey, I haven’t seen you in a while. I’m wondering how you’re doing can make a big difference in terms of getting that person back, you know, just moving them more towards that positive end.

Jessica Crate
I love that. And it’s so important community connection. And a side question from me would be, you know, through the pandemic, have you seen a rise or fall or a drastic slide on the continuum with with your clients and what, what have you seen coming out of it and going through it?

Dr. Emily Kline
Yeah, I think what comes to mind when you ask that question is really especially with the college student Since you know, college, if you go to college, it’s just one of those moments in your life where you often have an incredibly strong sense of belonging, you’re literally surrounded by peers, you’re all wearing the gear, the T shirts, you’re joining clubs, fraternities, sororities, it is one of the sort of most tightly knit communities you’ll ever belong to. And the pandemic really disrupted that for that age group, you know, kids are telling me about how they sort of endured, essentially, like solitary confinement in their dormitories, I don’t mean to sound dramatic, but they, I think they really suffered. And they felt guilty for complaining about it, because to complain about it was, you know, in some sense, they didn’t want to be, they don’t want to be seen as disrespectful to people who got COVID, or, or got really sick, or even died from COVID. And they, in the scheme of things, recognize that, hey, I’m a 19 year old college student, I don’t have to quit my job to take care of my kids or put myself out there every day and risk exposure to a serious virus. But they really did suffer because they were kind of out of their high school community, that childhood community that serves in protects us. And then they were in a new environment where they weren’t allowed to really be in community. And so I am seeing a lot of these sort of 18, 19, 20 year olds, who typing suffered a lot from that pivotal period of their life, not having those experiences of community. And then I think for younger kids to, you know, just not their worlds became very small, you know, they didn’t have those daily interactions with everyone at school, or with everyone at church for so long. And I think that that is that gradual erosion of a sense of belonging from just people knowing who you are, knowing your face, knowing your name, giving you a high five is it may be gradual, but I think it’s had an effect,

Jessica Crate
For sure. And you know, even talking about the ripple effect, if it’s affecting that age group, it’s affecting their families, their peers, their you know, everyone connected in that circle. So it’s been tough. But coming through this, you know, we talk a lot here, because we live in a resort town here in Utah. And, you know, I know it’s not just linked to a resort town, but what are some of the specific substance use wellness issues related to maybe living in a resort town or just dealing with what you work with? You know, children, youth peers, colleagues? And what are some of the tips and resources that you would recommend to our viewers?

Dr. Emily Kline
I don’t know much about living in a resort town. You know, I grew up in Pittsburgh, which is, nobody ever goes to by accident, like you don’t stumble upon it, you know. So it is lovely. And now I live in Boston, which does get tourists, but I wouldn’t call it a resort town.

Jessica Crate
Right.

Dr. Emily Kline
So I don’t know. Could you like be a little more specific about maybe

Jessica Crate
Even just, you know, talking about some of the substance use and wellness issues that you see, and maybe it’s the children, youth peers, colleagues that you work with? And what are some of the tips and resources that you have and to recommend?

Dr. Emily Kline
Okay, well, now you’re gonna let me get on my soapbox for a minute. Yes. So here in Massachusetts, well, we are a college town. Okay, so we have a ton of young people, you know, age like 18 to 25. And one big change that’s taken place in Massachusetts over the last few years is that legalization for anyone 21 And over of cannabis products, marijuana. So it has really changed the culture. And in some ways, you know, it’s good. You know, there’s some positives from it, that I could see that people don’t have to buy marijuana from, like a drug dealer. They have a little more quality control on what they’re getting. People aren’t getting arrested for, you know, having or selling marijuana. At the same time. What we’ve seen is that the that the concentrations of that Act is the psychoactive ingredient in marijuana, it’s called THC has skyrocketed. So this stuff gets you really, really high and it can really mess with your brain. And I think there’s a big perception out there that, you know, especially compared to hard drugs, like heroin or cocaine And, or even alcohol, that marijuana is kind of like herbal, natural, a harmless substance found this become a big part of the culture here. But what I see in clinic is a lot of people who are using this very high concentrate THC products, they’re using vape pens, which are fairly addictive, you can kind of keep it in your pocket. And you know, just take a little puff whenever you feel like it, it’s not a big process to dangerous, use it and it doesn’t create any smell that’s gonna bother anybody around you. So I see people using really high concentration marijuana products really frequently. And it can do some real damage to their brains. A lot of people do develop psychotic symptoms when they have been using a ton of marijuana. And for some people that doesn’t go away. So we do see people who develop schizophrenia, after a long period of using these products very heavily. And it seems to be that young people are more susceptible than than older adults whose basic

Jessica Crate
Their brains are still forming. And yeah, all the things that link to it that can be detrimental.

Dr. Emily Kline
Yeah, yeah. So I don’t know if that answers your question. But that is like kind of a specific cultural thing that I do see, where

Jessica Crate
I think that can be, you know, that can be said nationwide. And now when you talk about that, what are some tips and viewer Tips and Resources maybe you can share for our viewers?

Dr. Emily Kline
Well, I think first of all, people are pretty if they’re not cannabis users, a lot of people are pregnant, pretty ignorant about all the different products that are out there. So I actually recommend you go to a store and you check it out. So you kind of understand the process of you know, whether they’re carding, and how they’re documenting, identification, and you maybe talk to the retailer about some of the different products, so that you can understand what people might be using. And if you don’t live in a state that has cannabis stores, check out the websites because they have these kind of catalogs on the websites that are really informative. What you learn from the websites is all the different modes that people can use these products, they can use edibles, like gummy bears, and chocolate bars and cookies, they can use things that you smoke like the actual flower of the cannabis plant. They can use these extractions and distillations things that go into vape cartridge, or that you might mix in with flour, and consume different ways. And these products, they’re not all the same. So some of them are going to have a much higher THC concentration than others, and will have different psychological effects, including effects depending on how you use them. So I think first of all, people should just get on board with the different products that are out there. And then also just realizing that, even if you feel like, oh, I have all this expertise, that doesn’t mean anybody’s gonna listen to you, for sure, I really can’t control what anybody else does. And that’s just kind of a fact of life. Even, you know, even if you have a ton of knowledge or a ton of life experience, if you have a PhD, it doesn’t matter, you don’t have control over other people. So just really realizing that if you want to influence other people’s choices, it has to be through relationship. Yeah. And so you know, sort of getting to know people asking them questions about why they do what they do. And sort of that that non judgmental approach is our best bet, usually for influencing the people around us.

Jessica Crate
I love those two key tips is number one, educate yourself. And number two come from a place of love and care and true connection, build that relationship so that you can walk somebody through that process and be there. If you really care. You’ll be there through the journey. So you know, Dr. Emily, I love your talks on the School of Hard talks, and the book you have and some of the resources. Let’s talk about some of the action items you have in those tools. And what is something someone could do right now today to foster their well being during this time for ourselves for their command to stay connected in the community?

Dr. Emily Kline
Well, I think I’m gonna answer this question. Sorry. You’re gonna have to edit this out. Mmm hmm. Should I give like a skill like I introduced at the conference?

Jessica Crate
Yeah, the skills were great.

Dr. Emily Kline
Okay. All right. So one thing that people can try right now is a way to better connect with the people around them is to notice what I call their righting reflex, or the righting reflex is our impulse to help other people, it comes from a really good place. And that the impulse to help other people often takes the form of trying to solve problems for them, trying to explain things to them or give them advice, or trying to wave the problem away or saying, Oh, don’t worry about that, you know, I wish you wouldn’t be so stressed out.

Jessica Crate
Right.

Dr. Emily Kline
So it comes from a really good place, but it can actually get in the way of true connection. Because if we think about the people, like if I think about the people who I really like to go to, when I’m feeling stressed out or having a dilemma, it’s usually somebody not necessarily jumps in and gives me advice. Right away. It’s usually somebody who is a great listener, and asked good questions, and really wants to understand me and where I’m coming from, and who has faith that I can solve my own problems. So for me, that’s often like my husband, he’s like, Well, tell me more about it, but you’re gonna figure it out, you always do. And I, so I really like talking to him about my dilemmas. So learning how to, and I’m less likely to talk to someone who comes at me, with a lot of advice, it often feels like they’re actually criticizing me, or that they think I couldn’t think of that myself. So just understanding how you might be coming across to others, when you’re trying to help them, I think, is one really powerful tool for connection, just learning to notice that that righting reflex, that impulse to give advice or solve someone else’s problem, and instead working on becoming a better listener.

Jessica Crate
I love that. And we have two years in one mouth for a reason. Right. And so that is such a great tip. Now, one of my favorite questions on this podcast is if you could wave your magic wand, what would you like to see in the world? What would you like to see in your community? What is your like passion project that you’re like, Man, if I could just have this could happen tomorrow? What would that be?

Dr. Emily Kline
That is a great question. Um, I think, you know, I, as we’ve been talking about, I really think that every single kid’s mental health would be better off if they had an adult in their life, who is a great listener. So I guess my wish would be or just a friend who’s a great listener, too. So my wish would be that every kid has an adult who they feel like they can go to with sort of, and anticipate non judgmental understanding, and love and just have that safe space, to talk through all the dilemmas that we every single adolescent will encounter. You know, there’s no exceptions to it, every adolescent is going to have loneliness, is going to have opportunities to try different drugs and alcohol is going to have heartbreak is going to need to make big decisions about their career. So if every buddy had a person who they knew they could go to, and just talk things through, I feel like we would have a better world.

Jessica Crate
Amen to that. So if you’re a parent, or a supportive spouse, or somebody tuning in, let’s support Dr. Emily and her mission to help this communication pattern and support network just flourish with all of us. And we all step up a little bit. I think we can all make this happen for sure. Dr. Emily, last but not least what is your quote your legacy, your mantra, a slogan that you’d like to leave with our viewers today?

Dr. Emily Kline
I don’t know. I gotta think about this Jessica.

Jessica Crate
Slogan, a mantra you’re saying.

Dr. Emily Kline
If you want your kids to listen to you, you also have to listen to them.

Jessica Crate
Boom, drop the mic. That’s a great one. And so key. We’ll put that in below. If you’re taking notes, rewind that. Listen to that, again. Make sure you add that. If you want your kids to listen, you better listen to and I think it’s true. It goes both ways. So thank you, Dr. Emily Kline for joining us today on our Mental Health Mondays video podcast at CTC Summit County. On behalf of our executive director, Mary Christa Smith and mycself Jessica Crate Oveson. We thank you so much for tuning in. You can find a link to all of our podcasts on our blog and ctcsummitcounty.org make sure you follow Dr. Kline and get a link to all of her information below and we look forward to seeing you each and every Monday take care and bye for now.

Dr. Emily Kline
Awesome

Jessica Crate  
Hola a todos y bienvenidos a nuestros lunes de salud mental, un podcast de video de Communities That Care que habla sobre la salud mental. Soy Jessica Crate Oveson, la vocera visionaria de CTC Summit County. Y en CTC, nuestra visión es verdaderamente un mundo de conexión, vitalidad y bienestar donde los niños y las familias prosperan. Nuestra misión es mejorar en colaboración las vidas de los jóvenes y las familias fomentando una cultura de salud a través de la prevención. Y en CTC tenemos un dicho de que conexión es prevención. Y con el espíritu de conexión comunitaria, estamos encantados de tener hoy a la Dra. Emily Kline con nosotros. La Dra. Emily viene a nosotros con una biografía impresionante. Es psicóloga clínica y profesora asistente de psiquiatría en la Facultad de Medicina de la Universidad de Boston. Se desempeña como directora de servicios psicológicos para el equipo de bienestar y recuperación después de la psicosis y dirige el laboratorio de entrevistas motivacionales para seres queridos en el Boston Medical Center. Su investigación se centra en la psicosis central temprana, la salud mental de los adolescentes y adultos jóvenes y las intervenciones centradas en los padres. El Dr. Kline es el autor de uno de mis nuevos libros favoritos, School of Hard talks, cómo tener conversaciones reales con sus hijos casi adultos, y el creador de School of Hard talks en línea. Así que nos aseguraremos de incluir esos enlaces a continuación. Así que échales un vistazo. Ha publicado docenas de artículos que aparecen en una variedad de revistas académicas revisadas por pares, libros de texto y revistas populares. Y ha hablado con audiencias de todo el mundo sobre salud mental y comunicación interpersonal. La Dra. Kline completó su licenciatura en Haverford College, su maestría y doctorado en la Universidad de Maryland, condado de Baltimore, y su capacitación clínica y posdoctoral en la Escuela de Medicina de Harvard. Vive en Boston con su familia. Y estamos encantados de tenerla con nosotros hoy. Se presentó en una cumbre sobre la prevención de la conexión de aparatos ortopédicos en Utah y nos dejó boquiabiertos a todos. Dr. Emily, estamos muy emocionados de tenerlo con nosotros hoy. Gracias por estar con nosotros. Y empecemos, ya sabes, cuéntanos un poco más sobre ti, ya sabes, ¿qué haces con tus iniciativas? ¿Y realmente por qué, por qué te metiste en esto y amas lo que haces?

Dr. Emily Kline  
Sí, bueno, muchas gracias por recibirme. Me encanta hablar de estas cosas. Tan emocionada de tener esta conversación contigo. Así que soy psicóloga clínica, lo que significa que estudié psicología durante mucho tiempo. Y trabajé en la universidad, lo que significa que hago una combinación de tratar pacientes en una clínica, enseñar a estudiantes y psiquiatras cómo hacer una buena terapia. Y luego, si tengo suerte, tengo algo de tiempo para investigar, lo que significa que descubro nuevas formas de ayudar a las familias o reviso nuestros registros médicos y nuestros datos para descubrir qué funciona mejor para él. Así que es un punto, ya sabes, en la combinación de todos estos roles, hago mucha supervisión de psicoterapia y luego mucha psicoterapia familiar. Y esos no son tan diferentes, en realidad, me encontré teniendo exactamente las mismas conversaciones con mis alumnos sobre cómo comunicarse con sus clientes de terapia que estaba teniendo con los padres en terapia familiar sobre cómo conectarse con sus hijos. Y cuanto más comencé a notar esos paralelismos, pensé que esto es algo que deberíamos formalizar, ya que tenemos todas estas excelentes estrategias que enseñamos a nuestros estudiantes y a nuestros médicos en la clínica para ayudarlos a conectarse con los pacientes y alentarlos a hacer cambios más saludables. y opciones en sus vidas. Los padres también deben saber estas cosas. ¿Derecha? Entonces, eso es lo que he estado haciendo en los últimos dos años: tomar parte del plan de estudios que usamos con los aprendices de terapia y traducirlo en preguntar: ¿Cómo puede funcionar esto para las familias?

Jessica Crate  
Asombroso. Bueno, lo has hecho, has hecho mucho trabajo no solo a lo largo de los años, sino también trabajando con personas y ahora escribiendo un libro y trabajando en programas. Ya sabes, cuéntanos un poco más sobre lo que haces para fomentar realmente la prevención y cómo lo hacen tus iniciativas. Y realmente, ¿cuál es tu enfoque?

Dr. Emily Kline  
Entonces, um, como dijiste antes, en mi clínica, en realidad trabajo menos en prevención en cierto sentido y más, ya sabes, lo que llamo el extremo profundo de la salud mental, ya sabes, familias que ya están lidiando con enfermedades mentales graves. como trastornos psicóticos, principalmente esquizofrenia, trastorno bipolar grave o psicosis inducida por fármacos. Entonces eso no es prevención. Y sin embargo, ya sabes, cuanto más hago ese trabajo, más familias me dicen, esta es información que debería haber tenido hace mucho tiempo.

Jessica Crate  
Derecha

Dr. Emily Kline  
Entonces, ya sabes, es realmente ese tipo de impulso de las familias que veo en la clínica. Y no es que hayan causado la enfermedad mental de su hijo. Y en cierto sentido, probablemente no podrían haberlo evitado la mayor parte del tiempo, ya sabes, estas enfermedades mentales tienen un fuerte componente genético. Pero podrían haber evitado mucho dolor y sufrimiento,

Jessica Crate  
Derecha

Dr. Emily Kline  
Si hubieran podido reconocer lo que estaba pasando y efectivamente llegar al lugar correcto y decir lo correcto. Y, en cierto sentido, algunas enfermedades mentales se pueden prevenir, ya sabes, hay depresión y ansiedad, sabemos que es muy frecuente entre los adolescentes en este momento. Y creo que mucho de eso en realidad se puede prevenir, a través de un fuerte apoyo familiar y conexiones sociales.

Jessica Crate  
Derecha. Y hablando de eso, ya sabes, hablamos mucho aquí en este podcast sobre la conexión comunitaria y fomentar eso, ya sabes, a partir de tu experiencia, tengo dos preguntas que comenzaremos con la primera, ¿qué papel crees que tiene la comunidad? la conexión juega en nuestro bienestar? ¿Y cómo ha contribuido usted, su negocio, sus iniciativas a la salud y vitalidad de sus clientes, pacientes, personas con las que trabaja? ¿Qué han visto?

Dr. Emily Kline  
Sí, bueno, tu primera pregunta, ya sabes, ¿cómo contribuye la comunidad al bienestar? Creo que es realmente el bloque de construcción fundamental en muchos sentidos, ya sabes, hay muchas investigaciones que muestran que podemos superar muchas cosas en términos de experiencias estresantes o incluso traumáticas, si tenemos un fuerte apoyo social de familiares o amigos. Entonces, existe esta relación entre el estrés y la depresión que se ve en la literatura, pero esa relación es realmente fuerte para las personas que no tienen una conexión fuerte con su comunidad. Y en realidad es bastante débil para las personas que tienen una fuerte conexión con sus comunidades.

Jessica Crate  
Interesante.

Dr. Emily Kline  
Así que tenemos toda esta investigación que nos muestra que estar conectado, tener amistades sólidas, sentir un sentido de pertenencia, puede evitar que el estrés conduzca a una enfermedad mental. Y eso es como en el nivel de investigación, como la vista de 10,000 pies, en términos de lo que realmente veo, ya sabes, yo, hay, pienso en niños que están en riesgo de enfermedad mental, o que ya están experimentando una enfermedad mental , como algo así, este espectro de niños que, como, están teniendo un año difícil en la escuela, tal vez su mejor amigo se mudó de la ciudad y se sienten muy solos. a los niños que están en el fondo, como dije, ya saben, están experimentando síntomas severos, están usando drogas y alcohol para sobrellevar la situación. Pero hay un continuo entre esos niños, ya sabes, podemos pensar en eso como una especie de espectro de sufrimiento o enfermedad mental. Y creo que para cada punto a lo largo de ese continuo, conectarse con alguien puede llevarlo en la dirección correcta. Ya sabes, para ese niño cuyo amigo se mudó, hacer un nuevo amigo o ser invitado a participar en un equipo, en un club, o asistir a una reunión familiar el fin de semana con sus primos, realmente puede restaurar su sentido de bienestar y pertenencia, y alejarlos más de ese extremo más profundo y severo de ese continuo. E incluso para alguien que está realmente en el fondo, veo todo el tiempo, cómo una fuerte conexión con los padres, una fuerte conexión con la familia, o preservar las conexiones con los amigos que tenía antes de enfermarse, o simplemente alguien que se acerca en un manera no crítica, simplemente diciendo, Oye, no te he visto en mucho tiempo. Me pregunto cómo lo estás haciendo puede hacer una gran diferencia en términos de recuperar a esa persona, ya sabes, simplemente moviéndola más hacia ese final positivo.

Jessica Crate  
me encanta eso Y es tan importante la conexión con la comunidad. Y una pregunta secundaria mía sería, ya sabes, durante la pandemia, ¿has visto un aumento o una caída o una caída drástica en el continuo con tus clientes y qué, qué has visto salir y pasar?

Dr. Emily Kline  
Sí, creo que lo que te viene a la mente cuando haces esa pregunta es especialmente con el estudiante universitario. Como sabes, la universidad, si vas a la universidad, es solo uno de esos momentos en tu vida en los que a menudo tienes un sentido increíblemente fuerte de pertenencia, estás literalmente rodeado de compañeros, todos usan el equipo, las camisetas, te unes a clubes, fraternidades, hermandades, es una de las comunidades más unidas a las que jamás pertenecerás. Y la pandemia realmente interrumpió eso para ese grupo de edad, ya sabes, los niños me cuentan cómo soportaron, esencialmente, como el confinamiento solitario en sus dormitorios, no quiero sonar dramático, pero creo que realmente sufrido. Y se sintieron culpables por quejarse de eso, porque quejarse de eso era, en cierto sentido, no querían ser, no quieren ser vistos como una falta de respeto a las personas que contrajeron COVID, o, o se enfermó mucho, o incluso murió de COVID. Y ellos, en el esquema de las cosas, reconocen que soy un estudiante universitario de 19 años, no tengo que renunciar a mi trabajo para cuidar a mis hijos o exponerme todos los días y arriesgarme a exponerme a un virus grave. Pero realmente sufrieron porque estaban un poco fuera de la comunidad de su escuela secundaria, esa comunidad infantil que sirve para protegernos. Y luego estaban en un nuevo entorno en el que no se les permitía estar realmente en comunidad. Así que veo a muchos de estos jóvenes de 18, 19 y 20 años que sufrieron mucho al teclear en ese período crucial de su vida, al no tener esas experiencias de comunidad. Y luego creo que para los niños más pequeños, ya sabes, sus mundos no se volvieron muy pequeños, ya sabes, no tuvieron esas interacciones diarias con todos en la escuela o con todos en la iglesia durante tanto tiempo. Y creo que esa es la erosión gradual del sentido de pertenencia de la gente que sabe quién eres, conoce tu rostro, conoce tu nombre, chocar los cinco es posible que sea gradual, pero creo que ha tenido un efecto,

Jessica Crate  
Con seguridad. Y ya sabes, incluso hablando del efecto dominó, si está afectando a ese grupo de edad, está afectando a sus familias, a sus compañeros, a todos los conectados en ese círculo. Así que ha sido duro. Pero al pasar por esto, hablamos mucho aquí, porque vivimos en una ciudad turística aquí en Utah. Y, ya sabes, sé que no solo está relacionado con una ciudad turística, pero ¿cuáles son algunos de los problemas específicos de bienestar por uso de sustancias relacionados con quizás vivir en una ciudad turística o simplemente lidiar con lo que trabajas? Ya sabes, niños, jóvenes compañeros, colegas? ¿Y cuáles son algunos de los consejos y recursos que recomendaría a nuestros espectadores?

Dr. Emily Kline  
No sé mucho sobre vivir en una ciudad turística. Sabes, crecí en Pittsburgh, lo cual significa que nadie va por accidente, como si no te toparas con él, ya sabes. Así que es encantador. Y ahora vivo en Boston, que recibe turistas, pero no lo llamaría una ciudad turística.

Jessica Crate  
Derecha

Dr. Emily Kline  
Así que no lo sé. ¿Podría ser un poco más específico sobre tal vez

Jessica Crate 
Incluso solo, ya sabes, hablar sobre algunos de los problemas de uso de sustancias y bienestar que ves, y tal vez son los niños, jóvenes, compañeros, colegas con los que trabajas. ¿Y cuáles son algunos de los consejos y recursos que tienes y para recomendar?

Dr. Emily Kline  
Está bien, bueno, ahora me vas a dejar subir a mi tribuna por un minuto. Sí. Así que aquí en Massachusetts, bueno, somos una ciudad universitaria. De acuerdo, entonces tenemos un montón de jóvenes, ya sabes, de entre 18 y 25 años. Y un gran cambio que ha tenido lugar en Massachusetts en los últimos años es la legalización para cualquier persona mayor de 21 años de productos de cannabis, marihuana. Así que realmente ha cambiado la cultura. Y de alguna manera, ya sabes, es bueno. Sabes, hay algunos aspectos positivos de eso, que pude ver que la gente no tiene que comprarle marihuana, como un traficante de drogas. Tienen un poco más de control de calidad sobre lo que obtienen. La gente no está siendo arrestada por, ya sabes, tener o vender marihuana. Al mismo tiempo. Lo que hemos visto es que las concentraciones de esa Ley es el ingrediente psicoactivo en la marihuana, se llama THC se ha disparado. Así que esto te pone muy, muy alto y realmente puede alterar tu cerebro. Y creo que existe una gran percepción de que, sobre todo en comparación con las drogas duras, como la heroína o la cocaína y, o incluso el alcohol, que la marihuana es una especie de hierba, natural, una sustancia inofensiva que se ha convertido en una gran parte de la cultura aquí. Pero lo que veo en la clínica es que mucha gente está usando estos productos de THC muy concentrados, están usando bolígrafos vape, que son bastante adictivos, puedes guardarlos en tu bolsillo. Y ya sabes, solo dale una pequeña bocanada cuando te apetezca, no es un proceso demasiado peligroso, úsalo y no crea ningún olor que vaya a molestar a nadie a tu alrededor. Así que veo personas que usan productos de marihuana de muy alta concentración con mucha frecuencia. Y puede causar un daño real a sus cerebros. Muchas personas desarrollan síntomas psicóticos cuando han estado usando una tonelada de marihuana. Y para algunas personas eso no desaparece. Así que vemos personas que desarrollan esquizofrenia, después de un largo período de uso intensivo de estos productos. Y parece ser que los jóvenes son más susceptibles que los adultos mayores cuyas necesidades básicas

Jessica Crate  
Sus cerebros aún se están formando. Y sí, todas las cosas que se vinculan a él que pueden ser perjudiciales.

Dr. Emily Kline  
Sí, sí. Así que no sé si eso responde a tu pregunta. Pero eso es como una especie de cosa cultural específica que veo, donde

Jessica Crate  
Creo que eso puede ser, ya sabes, eso se puede decir en todo el país. Y ahora, cuando habla de eso, ¿cuáles son algunos consejos y sugerencias y recursos para los espectadores que tal vez pueda compartir con nuestros espectadores?

Dr. Emily Kline  
Bueno, creo que en primer lugar, las personas son bonitas si no consumen cannabis, muchas personas están embarazadas, bastante ignorantes acerca de todos los diferentes productos que existen. Así que en realidad te recomiendo que vayas a una tienda y lo compruebes. Entonces, entiende el proceso de lo que sabe, ya sea que estén cardando y cómo están documentando, identificando, y tal vez hable con el minorista sobre algunos de los diferentes productos, para que pueda entender lo que la gente podría estar usando. . Y si no vive en un estado que tenga tiendas de cannabis, consulte los sitios web porque tienen este tipo de catálogos en los sitios web que son realmente informativos. Lo que aprendes de los sitios web son todos los diferentes modos en que las personas pueden usar estos productos, pueden usar comestibles, como ositos de goma, barras de chocolate y galletas, pueden usar cosas que fumas como la flor real de la planta de cannabis. Pueden usar estas extracciones y destilaciones que van en el cartucho de vape, o que puede mezclar con harina y consumir de diferentes maneras. Y estos productos, no son todos iguales. Así que algunos de ellos van a tener una concentración de THC mucho más alta que otros, y tendrán diferentes efectos psicológicos, incluyendo efectos dependiendo de cómo los uses. Así que creo que, en primer lugar, la gente debería participar en los diferentes productos que existen. Y luego también darme cuenta de que, incluso si sientes que, oh, tengo toda esta experiencia, eso no significa que nadie te va a escuchar, seguro, realmente no puedo controlar lo que hacen los demás. Y eso es sólo una especie de hecho de la vida. Incluso, ya sabes, incluso si tienes un montón de conocimientos o una tonelada de experiencia de vida, si tienes un doctorado, no importa, no tienes control sobre otras personas. Así que realmente darte cuenta de que si quieres influir en las elecciones de otras personas, tiene que ser a través de la relación. Sí. Y ya sabes, conocer a la gente haciéndoles preguntas sobre por qué hacen lo que hacen. Y más o menos ese enfoque sin prejuicios es nuestra mejor apuesta, generalmente para influir en las personas que nos rodean.

Jessica Crate  
Me encantan esos dos consejos clave, es el número uno, infórmate. Y el número dos proviene de un lugar de amor, cuidado y verdadera conexión, construye esa relación para que puedas guiar a alguien a través de ese proceso y estar allí. Si realmente te importa. Estarás allí durante todo el viaje. Así que ya sabe, Dra. Emily, me encantan sus charlas sobre la Escuela de charlas duras, y el libro que tiene y algunos de los recursos. Hablemos de algunos de los elementos de acción que tiene en esas herramientas. ¿Y qué es algo que alguien podría hacer en este momento para fomentar su bienestar durante este tiempo para nosotros por su mandato de permanecer conectados en la comunidad?

Dr. Emily Kline  
Bueno, creo que voy a responder esta pregunta. Lo siento. Vas a tener que editar esto. Mmm mmm. ¿Debería dar una habilidad como la que presenté en la conferencia?

Jessica Crate  
Sí, las habilidades eran geniales.

Dr. Emily Kline 
Bueno. Está bien. Entonces, una cosa que las personas pueden probar en este momento es una forma de conectarse mejor con las personas que los rodean y notar lo que llamo su reflejo de enderezamiento, o el reflejo de enderezamiento es nuestro impulso de ayudar a otras personas, proviene de un lugar realmente bueno. Y que el impulso de ayudar a otras personas a menudo toma la forma de tratar de resolverles los problemas, tratar de explicarles cosas o darles consejos, o tratar de ignorar el problema o decir, Oh, no te preocupes por eso, Ya sabes, desearía que no estuvieras tan estresado.

Jessica Crate  
Derecha

Dr. Emily Kline  
Por lo tanto, proviene de un lugar realmente bueno, pero en realidad puede interponerse en el camino de una verdadera conexión. Porque si pensamos en las personas, como si pienso en las personas a las que realmente me gusta ir, cuando me siento estresado o tengo un dilema, generalmente alguien no necesariamente interviene y me da un consejo. De inmediato. Por lo general, es alguien que es un gran oyente, que hace buenas preguntas y que realmente quiere entenderme y de dónde vengo, y que tiene fe en que puedo resolver mis propios problemas. Entonces, para mí, a menudo es como mi esposo, él dice: Bueno, cuéntame más al respecto, pero lo resolverás, siempre lo haces. Y a mí, me gusta mucho hablar con él sobre mis dilemas. Entonces, aprender a hacerlo y es menos probable que hable con alguien que viene a mí, con muchos consejos, a menudo se siente como si en realidad me estuvieran criticando, o que pensaran que no podría pensar en eso por mí mismo. Así que simplemente entender cómo podrías parecerte a los demás, cuando intentas ayudarlos, creo que es una herramienta realmente poderosa para la conexión, simplemente aprender a notar ese reflejo corrector, ese impulso de dar consejos o resolver los problemas de otra persona. problema y, en cambio, trabajar para convertirse en un mejor oyente.

Jessica Crate  
me encanta eso Y tenemos dos años en una boca por una razón. Derecha. Y ese es un gran consejo. Ahora, una de mis preguntas favoritas en este podcast es si pudieras agitar tu varita mágica, ¿qué te gustaría ver en el mundo? ¿Qué te gustaría ver en tu comunidad? ¿Cuál es tu proyecto de pasión que te gusta, hombre, si pudiera tener esto podría suceder mañana? ¿Qué sería eso?

Dr. Emily Kline  
Esa es una buena pregunta. Um, creo, ya sabes, yo, como hemos estado hablando, realmente creo que la salud mental de cada niño estaría mejor si tuvieran un adulto en su vida, que es un gran oyente. Así que supongo que mi deseo sería o simplemente un amigo que también sea un gran oyente. Por lo tanto, mi deseo sería que cada niño tenga un adulto con el que sientan que pueden acudir, y anticipar una comprensión sin prejuicios, y amar y simplemente tener ese espacio seguro, para hablar sobre todos los dilemas que todos los adolescentes enfrentaremos. encontrar. Ya sabes, no hay excepciones, cada adolescente tendrá soledad, tendrá oportunidades de probar diferentes drogas y el alcohol tendrá angustia, tendrá que tomar grandes decisiones sobre su carrera. Entonces, si cada amigo tuviera una persona a la que supieran que pueden acudir y simplemente hablar sobre las cosas, siento que tendríamos un mundo mejor.

Jessica Crate  
Amen a eso. Entonces, si usted es un padre, un cónyuge solidario o alguien que se sintoniza, apoyemos a la Dra. Emily y su misión de ayudar a que este patrón de comunicación y red de apoyo florezca con todos nosotros. Y todos avanzamos un poco. Creo que todos podemos hacer que esto suceda con seguridad. Dra. Emily, por último, pero no menos importante, ¿cuál es su cita, su legado, su mantra, un eslogan que le gustaría dejar con nuestros espectadores hoy?

Dr. Emily Kline  
No sé. Tengo que pensar en esta Jessica.

Jessica Crate  
Eslogan, un mantra que estás diciendo.

Dr. Emily Kline  
Si quieres que tus hijos te escuchen, tú también tienes que escucharlos.

Jessica Crate  
Boom, suelta el micrófono. Eso es genial. Y tan clave. Pondremos eso abajo. Si estás tomando notas, rebobina eso. Escucha eso, otra vez. Asegúrate de agregar eso. Si quieres que tus hijos escuchen, es mejor que escuches y creo que es verdad. Va en ambos sentidos. Así que gracias, Dra. Emily Kline, por acompañarnos hoy en nuestro podcast de video de los Lunes de Salud Mental en CTC Summit County. En nombre de nuestra directora ejecutiva, Mary Christa Smith y de mí misma, Jessica Crate Oveson. Muchas gracias por sintonizarnos. Puede encontrar un enlace a todos nuestros podcasts en nuestro blog y ctcsummitcounty.org, asegúrese de seguir a la Dra. Kline y obtenga un enlace a toda su información a continuación y esperamos verlo. todos y cada uno de los lunes cuídate y adiós por ahora.

Dr. Emily Kline  
Impresionante.

Upcoming Events

Translate »