Mental Health Mondays Video Podcast with Shannon Pagdon

Jul 21, 2022 | CTC Blog, Mental Health Mondays

Shannon Pagdon, BA. Shannon (she/they) is a program manager for the Mental Health Association of San Francisco and a research assistant for the New York State Psychiatric Institute and University of Pittsburgh. Shannon is passionate about shedding light on historically neglected experiences of psychosis and shifting language around mental health. Shannon hopes to continue to expand access to mental health care into smaller communities across the nation, use lived experience to inform their work, and develop research from a lived experience perspective to continually grow systems of care.

From this discussion:

  • https://rethinkpsychosis.weebly.com
  • https://twitter.com/SPagdon
  • https://www.instagram.com/ShannonPag/
  • https://www.facebook.com/shannon.pagdon

Jessica Crate  
Hello everyone and welcome to Mental Health Mondays a video podcast from CTC Summit County discussing mental health. My name is Jessica Crate Oveson. I’m the visionary spokeswoman for Communities That Care Summit County and it CTC Summit County. Our vision is truly a world of connection, vitality and wellbeing where kids and families thrive. And our mission is to collaboratively improve the lives of youth and family by fostering a culture of health through prevention. So, at CTC, we have a saying that says connection is prevention. And then the spirit of community connection, we have the incredible Shannon Pagdon here from mental health associations of San Francisco, Shannon Pagdon is incredible. She’s a program manager, and a research assistant. She was in New York state psychiatric University and Institute in the University of Pittsburgh, Shannon is passionate about shedding light on historically neglected experiences of psychosis, and shifting language around mental health. Shannon hopes to continue to expand access to mental health care into smaller communities across the nation, use lived experiences to inform their work, and develop research from a lived experience perspective to continually grow systems of care. Shannon, you are incredible. You’ve done such phenomenal work not only through the pandemic, but moving from New York to San Francisco and working in both realms of mental health care. I’m excited to talk with you today. Thank you so much for joining us. Let’s start out by having you tell us a little bit more about yourself, your organization, the initiatives you have, and and why you love what you do.

Shannon Pagdon  
Yeah, absolutely. Thank you for having me. So I’m, I’m a nationally certified peer specialist, I’m really passionate just about this community and my work, my foundation is lived experience of psychosis. So I’m still kind of navigating my own recovery of its things. And with with my work, I would just say, I just have a lot of passion for shifting systems, which is how I kind of got involved in research after kind of being involved in the peer community. So very, you know, involved in a couple of different things, and just really passionate about all those projects.

Jessica Crate  
Yes. And, you know, dealing specifically with psychosis, you have gotten into this. Why did you get into this realm? And what kind of things do you focus on?

Shannon Pagdon  
So I focus, I have a big focus on language myself, just because, for me, a lot of clinical terminology did not fully describe my experiences of psychosis. So one of the projects that I have co led and kind of developed is called Beyond the Box, which is we’ve gathered kind of user responses from people about their experiences and have it publicly available for folks, which is really something that I’m just very, very passionate about in general is just kind of shifting those terms, because especially with psychosis, just a lot of terms kind of perpetuate stigma, things like negative symptoms, and it being called a serious mental illness. So when I was diagnosed at 18, I remember just having a lot of challenges coming to terms with kind of what what was said about the specific diagnosis, which is how I kind of gotten to the work initially, when I moved to New York, I started working for the same program. And I’m actually now a research assistant with on track New York. And they are specifically a coordinated specialty care program for psychosis. And it just kind of launched me into a very long term interest in the field.

Jessica Crate  
Fantastic. Well, I’m so excited to have you on not only do you come from a world of experience, but also working with people in the trenches currently. So talk to us about what you do through your work that focuses on prevention, especially within communities.

Shannon Pagdon  
Yeah, so I would say with on track New York, it’s it’s less about prevention, and more about kind of quality improvement for the program. For my work, I I try really, to allow folks to not have the experience that I had early on in my recovery, I kind of started having symptoms in high school in a small town. And there are generally and commonly a real lack of resources in small towns, which is kind of you know, so So as appear a big foundation of my work is again, just kind of making sure that people did not have the experience that I had when it comes to the terms that they’re given. Just like the types of people that they talk to for the most part so that that I would say is my my big role in prevention

Jessica Crate  
I love it. And you can tell you have passionate about that. And I love that your focus is helping people navigate their circumstances. So they don’t deal with what you’ve been through because and when you’ve gone through the fire and you’ve come out on top, you have so much more reason to do what you do and a love your passion through through all of this. So, you know, one of the questions we talk here about on our podcast is community connectedness. What role do you especially moving from New York to San Francisco and doing everything in between? What role do you think community connectedness plays in our well being? And how do you and your organization your initiatives? How do you contribute to the health and vitality of those you work with and the people in the community?

Shannon Pagdon  
I would say in general, community, connectedness, for me has been a very big part of my recovery. Like I mentioned, just finding pure work initially, which at this point was several years ago, but when it happened, it just was really the first time I truly felt connected to my peers for a number of years. And so just kind of giving, giving people that sense of support and having somebody who kind of understands where you are and where you’ve been. And generally, I would just say, yeah, kind of maintaining community connections in both of my jobs, and also just kind of, for me, personally has been a really big part of my recovery. Pure pure work also has a very large reciprocity aspect, which I really appreciate. I feel like, for me, it just, you know, not not only was was I giving something, but I also was really getting something from it. And I feel like for me, that has been a massive source of really feeling connected to my community.

Jessica Crate  
I love that. And it’s that back and forth when you serve, and you get so much more back and return. And when you help others, you get so much more back when you do that, too. And, and that’s why we love what we do here as well. Now, we live in a resort town, but this is not specific to a resort town. And I know that you deal with a lot of these issues. So let’s talk more about some of the specific substance use, maybe wellness issues that you see, related to your work coming in and out of the pandemic, you know, what are some of the tips and resources that you’d recommend to our viewers?

Shannon Pagdon  
Um, one thing I would say just as far as a general tip is, for folks to just take advantage of telehealth, I feel like there’s been a lot of conversations around mental health that is have opened up because of COVID. There’s just a lot of more willingness to kind of have these conversations and listen to people about their experiences. And so just being honest with loved ones and friends and family members about that, and kind of opening those dialogues. But also, you know, expanding access to communities, like the one that I grew up in, is easier now than ever, it won’t cost us anything to kind of expand to these other communities that really, really need resources. So those would be two very specific things that I would say just about kind of expanding resources.

Jessica Crate  
I love that and we’ll make sure we include all the links to connect with you below and a bunch of the resources we have. You can also find on ctcsummitcounty.org. So make sure that if you are a loved one are dealing with specific substance abuse, use mental health issues that you connect with those free health resources and get connected to telehealth. It is an amazing, phenomenal way for you to stay connected and have something right at your fingertips no matter where you are in the world or what your resources are, you can have those readily available. So thank you so much for sharing that, Shannon. Now, this is one of my favorite questions, because we love to take action. So if somebody’s listening, tuning in or viewing this today, what is one action item that you’d recommend for someone right now today to foster their well being for themselves and to stay connected in our communities?

Shannon Pagdon  
Well, I guess to start, one of my favorite techniques, which is one that folks have probably heard all the time is just to take a really big deep breath. That to me is one of the most grounding things in the world. And can just completely change my own kind of brain if I’m not in a good place. So that would be one thing I would say as far as building more connections right now I would just say, look into local organizations. I know that was has been a very large part of my own recovery and also just kind of getting an ongoing touch. It’s like you can get involved in advocacy you can get involved in just kind of, you know, peer work and kind of getting all of these different connections. So I would say for me, that has always been a really good starting point as far as getting that connection more immediately.

Jessica Crate  
Absolutely. And I feel like you know when you get involved you realize that You’re not alone. And you have so many other people out there who may be experiencing something similar or, or that can help you along your journey. So, great tips. Now, here’s another question we love on this podcast because it really brings forth your passion and your vision for the future. If you could wave your magic wand Shannon, what would you create in our communities? And what would you like to see in our world moving forward?

Shannon Pagdon  
Um, I mean, I definitely have the very niche interest of language around mental health. So I would say specifically, I would love to wave my wand and just see a lot of very common terms kind of shift for psychosis, I think I’ve mentioned briefly a lot of current terms very, very much perpetuate a lot of existing stigmas. And so just to kind of create more dialogue and openness and shift around those things, I also very, very much would love to just have easy access to resources in more rural communities. That’s definitely something I’m incredibly passionate about.

Jessica Crate  
Let’s all come together and help Shannon move forward to this mission. So please connect with her below. Last but not least, Shannon, what is your legacy? Your quote your mantra, what would you like to leave our viewers with today?

Shannon Pagdon  
I would say it’s okay not to be okay. Because I was told a lot during my recovery, just that my experiences were too extreme and kind of scary for people and so just recognizing that your mental health is always valid, and it is okay to kind of have these more extreme emotions and extreme experiences and it doesn’t make those experiences unwarranted and not okay to have. So that would that would be my final final quote that I would say

Jessica Crate  
100% It is okay to not be okay. And it’s a slogan that we we facilitate to our communities to through other organizations, and I love that you guys are amazing. Shannon, thank you so much for tuning in with us today. For our Mental Health Mondays video podcast by Communities That Care Summit County, on behalf of our executive director, Mary Christa Smith and myself, we thank you so much for tuning in. We will be here each and every Monday you can find a link to all of our podcasts or blog and our audios on ctcsummitcounty.org And we look forward to seeing you each and every week please connect with Shannon below. Share this out, show her some love. And we’ll see you all again soon. Thanks again. Bye for now.

Jessica Crate  
Hola a todos y bienvenidos a Mental Health Mondays, un video podcast de CTC Summit County sobre salud mental. Mi nombre es Jessica Crate Oveson. Soy la vocera visionaria de Communities That Care Summit County y su CTC Summit County. Nuestra visión es verdaderamente un mundo de conexión, vitalidad y bienestar donde los niños y las familias prosperen. Y nuestra misión es mejorar en colaboración las vidas de los jóvenes y las familias fomentando una cultura de salud a través de la prevención. Entonces, en CTC tenemos un dicho que dice que conexión es prevención. Y luego el espíritu de conexión comunitaria, tenemos aquí a la increíble Shannon Pagdon de las asociaciones de salud mental de San Francisco, Shannon Pagdon es increíble. Es directora de programa y asistente de investigación. Ella estaba en la Universidad e Instituto de Psiquiatría del estado de Nueva York en la Universidad de Pittsburgh, a Shannon le apasiona arrojar luz sobre experiencias de psicosis históricamente desatendidas y cambiar el lenguaje en torno a la salud mental. Shannon espera continuar ampliando el acceso a la atención de la salud mental en comunidades más pequeñas de todo el país, usar experiencias vividas para informar su trabajo y desarrollar investigaciones desde una perspectiva de experiencia vivida para hacer crecer continuamente los sistemas de atención. Shannon, eres increíble. Ha hecho un trabajo tan fenomenal no solo durante la pandemia, sino también al mudarse de Nueva York a San Francisco y trabajar en ambos ámbitos de la atención de la salud mental. Estoy emocionado de hablar contigo hoy. Muchísimas gracias por unirse a nosotros. Comencemos pidiéndole que nos cuente un poco más sobre usted, su organización, las iniciativas que tiene y por qué ama lo que hace.

Shannon Pagdon  
Si absolutamente. Gracias por tenerme. Así que soy, soy un especialista en pares certificado a nivel nacional, me apasiona mucho esta comunidad y mi trabajo, mi base es la experiencia vivida de la psicosis. Así que todavía estoy navegando en mi propia recuperación de sus cosas. Y con mi trabajo, solo diría que tengo mucha pasión por los sistemas cambiantes, que es como me involucré en la investigación después de estar involucrado en la comunidad de pares. Muy, ya sabes, involucrado en un par de cosas diferentes, y realmente apasionado por todos esos proyectos.

Jessica Crate  
Sí. Y, ya sabes, lidiando específicamente con la psicosis, te has metido en esto. ¿Por qué entraste en este reino? ¿Y en qué tipo de cosas te enfocas?

Shannon Pagdon  
Así que me enfoco, tengo un gran enfoque en el lenguaje, solo porque, para mí, mucha terminología clínica no describía completamente mis experiencias de psicosis. Entonces, uno de los proyectos que he codirigido y desarrollado se llama Beyond the Box, que es que hemos recopilado respuestas de usuarios de personas sobre sus experiencias y lo tenemos disponible públicamente para la gente, que es realmente algo que yo Lo que me apasiona mucho en general es simplemente cambiar esos términos, porque especialmente con la psicosis, muchos términos perpetúan el estigma, cosas como síntomas negativos, y se les llama una enfermedad mental grave. Entonces, cuando me diagnosticaron a los 18, recuerdo que tuve muchos desafíos para aceptar lo que se decía sobre el diagnóstico específico, que es cómo llegué al trabajo inicialmente, cuando me mudé a Nueva York, Empecé a trabajar para el mismo programa. Y, de hecho, ahora soy asistente de investigación en On Track New York. Y son específicamente un programa coordinado de atención especializada para la psicosis. Y simplemente me lanzó a un interés a muy largo plazo en el campo.

Jessica Crate  
Fantástico. Bueno, estoy muy emocionado de tenerte no solo porque vienes de un mundo de experiencia, sino que también trabajas con personas en las trincheras actualmente. Háblanos sobre lo que haces a través de tu trabajo que se enfoca en la prevención, especialmente dentro de las comunidades.

Shannon Pagdon  
Sí, diría que con Nueva York en camino, se trata menos de prevención y más de una especie de mejora de la calidad del programa. Para mi trabajo, realmente trato de permitir que las personas no tengan la experiencia que tuve al principio de mi recuperación, comencé a tener síntomas en la escuela secundaria en un pueblo pequeño. Y en general y comúnmente hay una falta real de recursos en las ciudades pequeñas, lo cual es algo así como que, como parece, una gran base de mi trabajo es, nuevamente, simplemente asegurarme de que las personas no tengan la experiencia que yo tuve. cuando se trata de los términos que se les dan. Al igual que los tipos de personas con las que hablan en su mayor parte, por lo que diría que es mi gran papel en la prevención.

Jessica Crate  
Me encanta. Y se nota que te apasiona eso. Y me encanta que su enfoque sea ayudar a las personas a navegar sus circunstancias. Así que no se ocupan de lo que has pasado porque y cuando has pasado por el fuego y has salido victorioso, tienes muchas más razones para hacer lo que haces y un amor a través de tu pasión. todo esto. Entonces, ya sabes, una de las preguntas de las que hablamos aquí en nuestro podcast es la conexión con la comunidad. ¿Qué papel desempeñas especialmente mudándote de Nueva York a San Francisco y haciendo todo lo demás? ¿Qué papel cree que juega la conexión comunitaria en nuestro bienestar? ¿Y cómo usted y su organización sus iniciativas? ¿Cómo contribuye a la salud y la vitalidad de las personas con las que trabaja y de la comunidad?

Shannon Pagdon  
Diría que, en general, la comunidad, la conexión, para mí ha sido una parte muy importante de mi recuperación. Como mencioné, solo encontré trabajo puro inicialmente, que en este momento fue hace varios años, pero cuando sucedió, fue realmente la primera vez que realmente me sentí conectado con mis compañeros durante varios años. Y así simplemente dar, darle a la gente esa sensación de apoyo y tener a alguien que entienda dónde estás y dónde has estado. Y, en general, solo diría, sí, mantener conexiones comunitarias en mis dos trabajos, y también, para mí, personalmente, ha sido una parte muy importante de mi recuperación. El trabajo puro puro también tiene un aspecto de reciprocidad muy grande, que realmente aprecio. Siento que, para mí, simplemente, ya sabes, no solo estaba dando algo, sino que también estaba obteniendo algo de eso. Y siento que para mí, eso ha sido una fuente masiva de sentirme realmente conectado con mi comunidad.

Jessica Crate  
me encanta eso Y es ese ir y venir cuando sirves, y obtienes mucho más de ida y vuelta. Y cuando ayudas a otros, obtienes mucho más cuando haces eso también. Y, y es por eso que amamos lo que hacemos aquí también. Ahora, vivimos en una ciudad turística, pero esto no es específico de una ciudad turística. Y sé que lidias con muchos de estos problemas. Entonces, hablemos más sobre algunos de los usos específicos de sustancias, tal vez los problemas de bienestar que ve, relacionados con su trabajo al entrar y salir de la pandemia, ya sabe, ¿cuáles son algunos de los consejos y recursos que recomendaría a nuestros espectadores? ?

Shannon Pagdon  
Um, una cosa que diría como un consejo general, para que la gente aproveche la telesalud, siento que ha habido muchas conversaciones sobre la salud mental que se han abierto debido a COVID. Simplemente hay mucha más voluntad de tener estas conversaciones y escuchar a las personas sobre sus experiencias. Y entonces, ser honesto con los seres queridos, amigos y familiares sobre eso, y abrir esos diálogos. Pero también, ya sabes, expandir el acceso a comunidades, como en la que crecí, es más fácil ahora que nunca, no nos costará nada expandirnos a estas otras comunidades que realmente necesitan recursos. Esas serían dos cosas muy específicas que diría sobre la expansión de los recursos.

Jessica Crate  
Me encanta y nos aseguraremos de incluir todos los enlaces para conectarnos contigo a continuación y un montón de los recursos que tenemos. También puede encontrar en ctcsummitcounty.org. Así que asegúrese de que si usted es un ser querido que está lidiando con el abuso de sustancias específicas, use los problemas de salud mental que se conectan con esos recursos de salud gratuitos y conéctese a la telesalud. Es una forma increíble y fenomenal de mantenerse conectado y tener algo al alcance de la mano, sin importar en qué parte del mundo se encuentre o cuáles sean sus recursos, puede tenerlos fácilmente disponibles. Así que muchas gracias por compartir eso, Shannon. Ahora bien, esta es una de mis preguntas favoritas, porque nos encanta actuar. Entonces, si alguien está escuchando, sintonizando o viendo esto hoy, ¿cuál es un elemento de acción que recomendaría para alguien en este momento para fomentar su bienestar y mantenerse conectado en nuestras comunidades?

Shannon Pagdon  
Bueno, supongo que para empezar, una de mis técnicas favoritas, que es una que la gente probablemente ha escuchado todo el tiempo, es simplemente respirar profundamente. Eso para mí es una de las cosas más sólidas del mundo. Y puede cambiar por completo mi propio tipo de cerebro si no estoy en un buen lugar. Entonces, eso sería algo que diría en cuanto a construir más conexiones en este momento, solo diría, investigue las organizaciones locales. Sé que ha sido una parte muy importante de mi propia recuperación y también de obtener un toque continuo. Es como si pudieras involucrarte en la promoción, puedes involucrarte en, ya sabes, trabajo entre pares y obtener todas estas conexiones diferentes. Entonces diría que para mí, ese siempre ha sido un muy buen punto de partida en cuanto a obtener esa conexión de manera más inmediata.

Jessica Crate  
Absolutamente. Y siento que sabes que cuando te involucras te das cuenta de que no estás solo. Y tienes muchas otras personas que pueden estar experimentando algo similar o que pueden ayudarte en tu viaje. Entonces, excelentes consejos. Ahora, aquí hay otra pregunta que nos encanta en este podcast porque realmente saca a relucir su pasión y su visión del futuro. Si pudieras agitar tu varita mágica Shannon, ¿qué crearías en nuestras comunidades? ¿Y qué le gustaría ver en nuestro mundo avanzando?

Shannon Pagdon  
Um, quiero decir, definitivamente tengo el nicho de interés del lenguaje en torno a la salud mental. Así que diría específicamente, me encantaría agitar mi varita y ver muchos términos muy comunes como un tipo de cambio para la psicosis, creo que he mencionado brevemente muchos términos actuales que perpetúan muchos de los estigmas existentes. . Entonces, solo para crear más diálogo y apertura y cambiar esas cosas, también me encantaría tener un acceso fácil a los recursos en más comunidades rurales. Eso es definitivamente algo que me apasiona increíblemente.

Jessica Crate  
Unámonos todos y ayudemos a Shannon a avanzar en esta misión. Así que por favor conéctese con ella a continuación. Por último, pero no menos importante, Shannon, ¿cuál es tu legado? Tu cita es tu mantra, ¿qué te gustaría dejar a nuestros espectadores hoy?

Shannon Pagdon  
Diría que está bien no estar bien. Porque me dijeron mucho durante mi recuperación, solo que mis experiencias fueron demasiado extremas y un poco atemorizantes para las personas y, por lo tanto, reconocer que su salud mental siempre es válida y que está bien tener estas emociones más extremas y experiencias extremas. y no hace que esas experiencias sean injustificadas y no esté bien tenerlas. Así que esa sería mi última cita final que diría

Jessica Crate  
100% Está bien no estar bien. Y es un eslogan que facilitamos a nuestras comunidades a través de otras organizaciones, y me encanta que ustedes sean increíbles. Shannon, muchas gracias por sintonizarnos hoy. Para nuestro video podcast de Mental Health Mondays de Communities That Care Summit County, en nombre de nuestra directora ejecutiva, Mary Christa Smith y mía, le agradecemos mucho por sintonizarnos. Estaremos aquí todos los lunes. Puede encontrar un enlace a todos nuestros podcasts o blog y nuestros audios en ctcsummitcounty.org Y esperamos verlo todas las semanas, conéctese con Shannon a continuación. Comparte esto, muéstrale un poco de amor. Y nos volveremos a ver pronto. Gracias de nuevo. Adiós por ahora.

Upcoming Events

Translate »